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Wilwarin

What color wash should I use?

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I'm currently painting "Boudicea" from Stormtrooper Miniatures. Love the piece thus far, and am trying to paint her as accurately as possible. In most of the artwork I have seen of her, she's got on an orange-red dress, which I mimic in the miniature itself. I've shaded it already before I start the next part of her dress, which is plaid-ish. Right now, though, it's in desperate need of a wash.

 

My question is, what color should I use? I don't want to do red because I don't want the dress to appear red. Right now I'm leaning on brown.... but am definitely open to other thoughts and ideas.

 

Please note that this is a WIP, so please feel free to share any pointers you could give in bettering her. The skin is NOT done, nor is her face, so please don't fear about that. Thanks!!

Original artwork I'm basing her on:

post-4937-0-36844500-1374182357.jpg

 

What I have so far:

 

post-4937-0-88229500-1374182383_thumb.jpg

 

P.S. the images appear more reddish, but I assure you that her dress is closer to the orange-red in the picture. My photo-fu just stinks :)

Edited by Wilwarin
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So here's the results of my research. (I was looking up historical tartans and plaids.) Plaid existed not a big thing done in this period because it is difficult to weave. Yes Celts had and used plaids but not to the extent that 19th century books on the subject would lead you to believe. This picture looks like a 19th century illustration. The orange she wore was a product of dying with saffron. Therefore moving this through yellow wouldn't be far off. I would move this through yellow highlights first and then see what you have. I would also shade with blue. I would mix blue liner with your darkest orange you have used and shade.

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So here's the results of my research. (I was looking up historical tartans and plaids.) Plaid existed not a big thing done in this period because it is difficult to weave. Yes Celts had and used plaids but not to the extent that 19th century books on the subject would lead you to believe. This picture looks like a 19th century illustration. The orange she wore was a product of dying with saffron. Therefore moving this through yellow wouldn't be far off. I would move this through yellow highlights first and then see what you have. I would also shade with blue. I would mix blue liner with your darkest orange you have used and shade.

 

So should I just skip that plaid then since it seems inaccurate now? As for highlighting, I'll do just that and put more blue into the shadows. I used a dark tealish blue to the shading originally, but can go over it more again with the blue.

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Not inaccurate, She was a warrior queen, and so was more likely to wear more complex cloth. Just that in almost all images of early AD Celts they all are wearing plaids. They did, just not on everything. And don't get me started on clan tartans.

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Not inaccurate, She was a warrior queen, and so was more likely to wear more complex cloth. Just that in almost all images of early AD Celts they all are wearing plaids. They did, just not on everything. And don't get me started on clan tartans.

 

You know, that didn't even cross my mind. Of course royalty would be able to afford those harder to make clothes. I'll keep the plaid in; I was really looking forward to painting it, anyway :) I'll try to update her tonight and post progress here.

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The artwork looks 18th century to me, but it's sometimes hard to tell. It's squarely in the tradition of popular "ye olde hystoricke tymes" engravings which grew out of the Gothic revival starting around 1750 (Sweden started fancy-dress medieval jousting in 1777. Imagine! Contemporary with Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin).

 

It isn't terrible, but everything in it should be taken with a grain of salt.

 

Remember, tartans were not especially formalized until Sir Walter Scott's wildly popular Victorian pseudo-Romantickal fantasies of Scottish and medieval life, after which every family with a vague connection to Scotland clamored for a tartan the way those aspiring to the gentry demanded heraldic arms.

 

Victorian scholarship was wobbly, and one has to be cautious with any 18th or 19th century depiction of ancient life.

 

Barring evidence from an archeological dig (and they tend to be fascinating), I think you can paint this figure as you like.

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And using my advanced search-fu

Boadicea, Queen of the Iceni, designed by C.H.S., engraved by Richard Havell the Elder, published 1815 (aquatint)

 

It hurts to be right sometimes. ::D: So my guess was right. It is 19th century.

 

Not inaccurate, She was a warrior queen, and so was more likely to wear more complex cloth. Just that in almost all images of early AD Celts they all are wearing plaids. They did, just not on everything. And don't get me started on clan tartans.

 

It still makes the stripey plaid a little suspect. Last time I went to a Ren Fair (or as I call them the anachronism fair) some so called tartan wearers were giving me crap for wearing my UtiliKilt. I replied, "When in Rome." The Irony was lost on them. :D

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I've never been to a RenFaire, but if someone gave me issues on my kilt, I would give them a bloody good lecture on the made up history of the Clan Tartan, the modern kilt, and the attempted fraud that brought it to us.

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