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Magic Sculpt application questions


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I picked up some small round wooden bases to use for my Bones Giant guys and gals. Im wanting to use Magic Sculpt to build up the 'ground' a little and form the terrain, meshing with and integrating the broccoli base for simplicity (I plan on painting and completing the figures first, then I'll glue and/or pin the Bones base directly to the wooden base and build up around that).

 

Does anyone have experience with using Magic Sculpt for basing in this manner? I assume the MS will adhere to the base without coming off later. Are you able to super glue things to Magic Sculpt effectively?

 

Any advice or alternative ideas are welcome. Thanks in advance!

 

 

 

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I love that stuff! I've found that Magic Sculpt, Magic Sculp (I've found containers that spell it without the "t" and yet it seems to be the same product), and Apoxie Sculpt (different manufacturer, very similar compound) all work well for building up decorative bases and such.

 

Magic Sculpt is very different from the "green stuff." I tends to be cheaper, ounce per ounce, and thus more attractive for filling in larger areas where less fiddly detail is required -- such as building up bases, as you've described. You can use a tiny bit of moisture on your sculpting implement to "smooth out" the surface of the putty, but beware getting it TOO wet. Too much moisture, and Magic Sculpt's ability to bond will be compromised, and it will make a bit of a mess.

 

Based on my experience, Magic Sculpt DOES NOT shrink upon hardening (or if it does, the amount is insignificant), and thus I have had no problems with the putty pulling away from surfaces. If it is an especially SMOOTH and FLAT surface without any "anchor points" for the putty, there is the possibility that the putty might "pop" off afterward, but a drop of super glue will solve the problem nicely. Super glue, in my experience, works just fine with Magic Sculpt. In fact, I've even done a few projects where I apply the super glue BEFORE the Magic Sculpt has hardened, and then applied a piece in order to get a really firm anchor and a perfect fit. (E.g., I made some "blobs" of Magic Sculpt, and took various broken weapon "bitz," put drops of super glue on them, then jammed them into the blobs of un-hardened putty so I'd have some blobs with interesting pieces of junk sticking out of them, inspired by the look of slimes/sludges from the World of Warcraft online game.)

 

One nice thing about Magic Sculpt is that it's very forgiving in the ratios between the two compounds that you mix together. If you don't get the compounds PRECISELY equal, it will still be fine, as long as it's still in the general neighborhood, though it will impact the curing time (if the mix is off, it often takes longer for it to completely harden). Just make sure that you thoroughly mix it. Another nice thing about it is that it can be shaved and sanded once it completely hardens, so it's ideal for making "machined" surfaces, if for some reason you want to go for that.

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I've used Magic Sculp for years. (16 oz. lasts for a very long time, btw.) It sticks well to both metal and wood bases, holds minis and rocks well after it cures, and accepts glue (both PVA and CA) without an issue.

 

For mixing, since I tend to use small amounts, I usually squash a roll of each component together, tear across the resulting ribbon, stack, squash, and repeat. Do that 20 times and you have over a million layers, which has never given me any problems when curing.

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Thanks for all the replies! I've used Magic Sculpt only briefly in the past to make the plain base for the Candy and Cola Super Dungeon Explore metal mini match the stone molded bases that came with the other figs included in the board game.

 

I made a mold from one of the normal bases and used MS to cover the plain base in a thin layer and press against the mold.

 

That's about the extent of my experience with it so far, but I plan to make some rocks from molds with it and glue them to the base as I am forming it in stages.

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If it is an especially SMOOTH and FLAT surface without any "anchor points" for the putty, there is the possibility that the putty might "pop" off afterward, but a drop of super glue will solve the problem nicely. Super glue, in my experience, works just fine with Magic Sculpt.

It would probably be a good idea to rough up the base a little before you apply the magic sculp as it should hold a little better. Rough it up with course sand paper or an Xacto blade or even drill a few holes in the base.

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