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catdancer

Salvage wharf workshop...(Nostalgic modern day)

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Having spent my youthful summer vacations from school at places like Vaca Key, Breton Sound and Alazan Bay; I learned a great deal about boat repair and salvage work by doing all kinds of jobs at small wharves and deep sea salvage firms.

 

This piece is from those youthful days and memories...It is 98% completely scratch built (example: the paint cans are drinking straws...the hot water heater is a cigar tube...the sink is fashioned out of heated plastic sheet...the coffee pot, fry pan and other items are made from sheet lead...and so on. The non-scratch built items are all parts from my extensive parts box.

 

This is another piece that allowed me extensive usage of my term " organized chaos "...I have been working on this piece (off and on) for about 3 years...maybe one day I will finish it...but until then, each time I take it out and work on it...it brings back those youthful memories of yesteryear.

 

There is a secondary building that goes with this piece (no interior detail...just exterior) that I will post later today or in the next few days.

 

Hope that you will enjoy viewing both of these pieces of nostalgic memorabilia from the life of Catdancer.

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Organized chaos indeed.

 

All I have left to say is how amazed I am at so much of this being scratch built. All the little details are just incredible!

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I think the thing I enjoy most about your diorama work is that you have an excellent eye for small details that dramatically increase the verisimilitude of the scene. Paint rings, stained sink, clipboard, ... they really sell the scene.

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To echo those above me, the attention to detail is astounding. From the logos on the various products, to the carefully crafted pipes on the water heater (that even have appropriate joints), to the various layers of leftover paint in the paint tray. Truly incredible work!

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Again. Blown away. You're one dedicated dude to even do something like this. I imagine if I started something of this scope it'd take me years and years to finish.

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Catdancer - I've watched your wonderful fantasy tabletop scenery threads for a while, but don't think I've ever commented. These last three (nostalgia) are superb.

 

You can really tell how much effort and care has gone into each of these. I'm loving that every time I look, I find something else that catches my eye. The attention to detail is phenomenal.

 

Lastly, your weathering techniques are amazing. Keep up the great work! These are really impressive.

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Catdancer, this is a brilliant evocation and carefully executed reconstruction of a messy ol' salvage workshop. I love your attention to detail.

 

Have you shown these to any art or craft gallery owners? I keep thinking these are really appealing, and maybe collectors might be interested in them.

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Catdancer, this is a brilliant evocation and carefully executed reconstruction of a messy ol' salvage workshop. I love your attention to detail.

 

Have you shown these to any art or craft gallery owners? I keep thinking these are really appealing, and maybe collectors might be interested in them.

No I have not Pingo. That suggestion has been made to me in the past...as has putting my materials on e-bay or such other venue...but I am not really interested in the marketing of my pieces. I do thank you for your kind thoughts and suggestion.

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