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So, I'm a beginner. I had a friend who introduced me to painting, but he moved away shortly thereafter. Sadface. So I went to the local paint shop and bought myself basic red, blue, yellow, black and white (and pink, purple and a sparkly blue because I'm like that). I've also got thinner so I can make washes. I'm thinking that as I paint more, I'll want more colors - especially skin tones which I feel like will be hard to get right. I've got extremely limited funds, so I was looking for suggestions. Outside of primary colors, what would you suggest a beginner get? I've given myself an extremely generous budget of $20 a month (okay $25 if I get it from reaper to get free shipping), and I want to be able still afford minis after buying paint so I'm thinking three or four colors and then a couple of minis I've got my eye on.

 

If it's relevant, I don't play, I just paint, and I like the historical/fantasy types more than military etc.

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Flesh colors, browns, and greens. Grays.

 

Before you hit up the local paint shop, I would have advised you to use your first month's $25 budget to buy a Reaper Learn to Paint Kit - http://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore/Learn%20To%20Paint%20Kits/sku-down/08901 - which would have given you two starter brushes, two minis, the instructions to paint them, and an excellent starting array of paints. And then next month purchased kit 2, the month after kit 4, and then 5 and 3.

 

This is still an option, of course, but you're going to end up doubling your basic colors pretty quickly.

 

Edit: They still show the sample pots in the LTPK entries, but they haven't come with those for years. All of the kits are full dropper bottles of paint these days, making them a ridiculously good bargain - $30 worth of paint for $25.99, with free brushes, minis, and instructions, basically.

Edited by Last Knight
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First of all, what brand of paints do you already have? I would advocate starting with craft paints. They are much cheaper than hobby paints, so you can build a fairly wide array of paints fairly quickly, and then fill it in with Reaper paints once you have a good selection of colors. Many disagree with me here, but I think that this is your best bet on such a low budget.

 

I also second everything Last Knight said. Greens and browns are very common, and hard to mix properly, and you definitely need at least one designated flesh tone. Two browns is a minimum, one mid-tone and one dark brown. The LTPKs are excellent deals and I highly recommend them if you are at all interested in metal figures. (If you would prefer to stick exclusively to Bones figures, as I do, there are Bones LTPKs rumored in the future.) Speaking of which, you didn't ask about figures, but I would point you towards Bones as the best use of your limited budget, especially as a beginning painter.

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Ah, I wish I had seen the learn to paint kit! I might get that for next month. I don't think doubling up on basics is terrible, especially if it's part of a kit. But I'm not going to go out and buy two different shades of red.

 

I'm using Tamiya acrylics. It was the cheapest hobby paint they had in non-military colors at the game store.

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Keep in mind that they'll be a little tougher to use, but they're so much cheaper that I used them for ages before starting to invest in the more expensive ones. (I used mostly Apple Barrel brand.)

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welcome! I second the need for flesh tones and browns. My most-used colors from reaper are walnut brown, ruddy brown, intense brown, and tanned highlight. I also really like marine teal, viper green, carnage red, saffron sunset and nightshade purple. Walnut and nightshade are excellent "blacks" If you prefer vallejo paints, I've loved ocher brown, olive green, blue green, royal purple and sand yellow.

 

It's harder to mix your secondaries than you would think. It's much easier to mix your grays and to an extent your flesh colors. A good selection of browns are like gold. They double as flesh colors when mixed with white.

 

Also, you probably don't need thinner. For all my reaper/vallejo paints I just thin with water. You can treat them almost like watercolors in that respect. You might like to get a primer if you're painting metal or resin. Also a sealer for when you are done is a good idea to protect your work. I like testors dullcote for matte finishes, reaper's brush-on primer, and I use a vallejo gloss sealer.

 

Have fun!!!

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Yeah, if they had had reaper paints at the store I would have just gotten that, but the idea was that I wanted to paint right away (of course life got in the way and I didn't).

 

Does anyone know how often they restock the learn to paint kits? It looks like they don't have any of the set 2. I'm trying to gauge what colors I'll build up using the kits, but they don't have that info for the outstock one.

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buy single colors instead of waiting for a restock of the ltpks

 

that way you can choose the colors you really like instead the ones that comes in the ltpk

 

i recomend you these skin colors

 

 

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I second Goblyn, the Triads are also a great place to start. I also second other people that say that you don't need thinner, I've never used thinner before. I also stretch my budget by using things from around the house, old cups for paint pots and disposable plates for wet palettes.
I make my wet palettes by taking a disposable plastic plate, filling the bottom with a few layers of paper towel and them covering that with baking / cooking paper. Then wet the paper towel, so that it's wet but not pooling on-top of the baking paper. This is way better than just using a regular old palette because your paints don't dry up while using them, which means less waste. After I'm finished with my palette for the day, I just cover it with cling wrap (or if you use an old take-away container for your palette, just put the lid on) and my paint stays fresh for days. Even longer if I keep adding water to the paper towel.

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Eeeeh, I wouldn't recommend starting with the triads if you only have $20 per month for paints and figures. That's half your budget for a few shades of just one color. I'd get a full range of colors, and then work on shadows and highlights for them.

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I'll echo that you should get basic colours first, plus Pure White and Pure Black. In theory you should be able to make any colour you wish. Flesh tones are notoriously difficult to mix though, so I'd also opt for the "base" colour of a few fleshtones (eg, Tanned Skin, Fair Skin). You can mix the shadow and highlight yourself.

 

Carnage Red, Sapphire Blue, Grass Green, Sun Yellow, Imperial Purple, Pure White, Pure Black, Intense Brown, Tanned Skin, Fair Skin, Tanned Leather, Walnut Brown.

 

Should get you started, but IMO the LTPK's are worth it for starting out. The above paint list costs $40 for 12 paints. You could pay $25 for 10 paints instead.

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Also, it's not to difficult to mix a good passable flesh from brown/red/white. When I first got started I picked up Green, Red, Blue, Brown, Black, White, and Silver. I mixed everything else from those. One suggestion I will make is to get some small resealable containers, and when you hit on a mix you particularly like, mix up a quantity of it to save from having to remix every time. In addition if you mix up a base flesh tone you can always modify by introducing other colors in like yellow or green.

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I add my vote for the Learn to Paint Kits, even though I haven't gotten one yet myself (that's next on my shopping list! :) ). Reaper paints already have thinner and flow improver in them, and thin quite well with water for washes, so you won't need your thinner for them.

 

HOWEVER, I've found that I definitely needed it when I started out with craft paints. The ones I had were very thick, and it would have been like trying to paint with pudding if I hadn't used a thinner of some kind. :)

 

That said, welcome to the hobby! Remember to have fun and don't worry too much about making mistakes; they're learning experiences! :D

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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