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If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B-Movie Actor by Bruce Campbell.

I don't read biographies, but this is one of the exceptions. Everyone should read this book.

 

I'm re-reading Night Watch. No, not Discworld. The Russian one.

 

Haven't read the books yet, but I liked the movies (Night Watch and Day Watch).

 

The movie of Night Watch only covers one of the three major stories in the Night Watch book. I enjoy the movies, but I feel the plot of the books is far superior than the movie. The author wrote a fourth book (Last Watch) and makes little jokes about the differences between the book and movies.

 

Day Watch is nothing like the book of the same name and doesn't have all that much to do with the book plots at all. I didn't like it as much as I did the NW movie, but I'm going to re-watch it tonight. Hopefully, a second viewing will allow me to enjoy it more.

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Just finished Small Favor (Dresden Files #10) last night. Gotta re-read Turn Coat now b/c I bought it a couple years ago on clearance in hard-cover. Its what convinced me to read the series.

 

I just bought the latest Dresden novel over lunch. Kinda sad that I won't be able to pick up another one next payday. ::(:

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Semi-recently (finally!) read "Do Androids Dream of Electronic Sheep?" by Philip K. Dick, along with a few of his short(er) stories. More recently, I read through the Karen Traviss "Republic Commando / Imperial Commando" Star Wars novel series, just because Clone Troopers're cool, even if most everything revealed in that series is contradicted by Clone Wars TV canon. ;) Also, partway through Terry Pratchett's "Unseen Academicals" (Discworld series).

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Kickstart Comments, and re-reading Sword of Shannara

 

 

I liked the original Shannara trilogy; then it kind of wandered off in a weird direction. I think I'll go back and read those, or maybe try to find the audiobook.

 

-Dave

 

The Sword of Shannara was the book that introduced me to fantasy. I read that book in less than 2 days, one of my all-time favorites and very enjoyable read.

 

I need to get caught up on all the new stuff that Brooks has been putting out. He's been doing a bunch of shorter novels pertaining to the druids of Shanarra now.

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On the train: 'Elizabeth & Mary' by Jane Dunn - something about 2 queens who were also cousins. The back cover spoiled that it would all end in tears.

At Page 272 for the moment. Sometimes a bit slow reading because the writer keeps repeating stuff. I think there's also a bigger emphasis on what Elizabeth did, but maybe that's because there's more written material about her. For the moment Mary is considering who her second husband should be and Liz is manipulating, afraid some foreign power (France? Spain?) could get a foothold in Scotland or Mary would choose Robert Dudley. It's an interesting book because I don't know that much about that period in history. Also it's Part Four in my books sequence about ruling women (the other were 'She Wolves' by Helen Castor, 'Catherine de Medici' by Leonie Frieda and 'Mary Tudor' by Anna Whitelock).

 

On my night stand: 'Republic of Thieves' by Scott Lynch - the third book in the Lock Lamora series. I have only read the prologue.

 

In between: picking ideas left and right for my Eberron campaign.

 

Previously finished book: 'Fallen Angel' by Daniel Silva. Modern espionage thriller; the umpteenth book in the Gabriel Allon series (Gabriel is an art restorer/hit-man for the Mossad, who gets around). Light reading.

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The back cover spoiled that it would all end in tears.

 

If the back cover of a book on John Wilkes Booth mentions that he kills Lincoln, or if your book on Napoleon mentions that he loses a battle in Belgium at the end of his career, I'm pretty sure that's not a spoiler. ^_^

 

Wait...Booth killed Lincoln? I thought Lincoln was a vampire, who hunted and killed evil?

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The back cover spoiled that it would all end in tears.

 

If the back cover of a book on John Wilkes Booth mentions that he kills Lincoln, or if your book on Napoleon mentions that he loses a battle in Belgium at the end of his career, I'm pretty sure that's not a spoiler. ^_^

 

Wait...Booth killed Lincoln? I thought Lincoln was a vampire, who hunted and killed evil?

 

 

Oopsie?

 

:;):

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The back cover spoiled that it would all end in tears.

 

If the back cover of a book on John Wilkes Booth mentions that he kills Lincoln, or if your book on Napoleon mentions that he loses a battle in Belgium at the end of his career, I'm pretty sure that's not a spoiler. ^_^

 

That second reveal would be a surprise, as Belgium didn't exist in 1815 :;):

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I just finished "Playing at the World" and "Of Dice and Men" and think the two complement one another well.  Jon Peterson is the Tolkien of the non-fiction world in that he goes into a LOT of detail in his writing.  "Playing at the World" took me a while to get through, was heavy on details, and while interesting, in the end I felt it didn't touch on enough history/details of TSR and D&D in general.  Honestly, you could read the first and last chapters to get the most of what he has to say about D&D.  Everything in between touches on the history of dice, games, swords, etc.

 

"Of Dice and Men", on the other hand, is a quick and fun read.  It works the author's own experiences playing D&D into the history of the game and TSR as a company.  At about 250 pages I felt I learned more than from the nearly 700 pages of PatW.  On the plus side, PatW turned me on to some authors I'd either never heard of or never took the time to read (Fritz Leiber in particular.)

 

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Currently reading the Book IV of the Sundering Series (The Reaver), by Richard Lee Byers. This is a new series by multiple authors kicking off the changes to the Forgotten Realms world.

Richard's a great guy, and he had a good time writing that one. Have you read Blind God's Bluff by him? It's set in Tampa and it's one of my favorites.

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