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I just finished Neuromancer by William Gibson and am now on to Count Zero - it is sometimes amusing seeing the dated technobabble (the main character gets 3MB of RAM stolen from him by his girlfriend - what's that 1/2 an mp3 file? :lol: ) but the story is beautifully told and the way tension mounts in both the real world and cyberspace is very well handled.

I love early Cyberpunk. Gibson is the Grand Pubaa obviously, but have you read Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson? Where Gibson is cerebral and sometimes a bit abstract , Stephenson is what my 16 year old self would've thought of as AWESOME. His protagonist is a dredlocked half Japanese half black pizza delivery guy/hacker who carries a katana with him everywhere. His name is Hiro Protagonist. Seriously. If that's a bit too silly sounding, this book is not for you, but if part of your brain just went "heh, rad" then you need to read this thing.

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I just finished Neuromancer by William Gibson and am now on to Count Zero - it is sometimes amusing seeing the dated technobabble (the main character gets 3MB of RAM stolen from him by his girlfriend - what's that 1/2 an mp3 file? :lol: ) but the story is beautifully told and the way tension mounts in both the real world and cyberspace is very well handled.

I love early Cyberpunk. Gibson is the Grand Pubaa obviously, but have you read Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson? Where Gibson is cerebral and sometimes a bit abstract , Stephenson is what my 16 year old self would've thought of as AWESOME. His protagonist is a dredlocked half Japanese half black pizza delivery guy/hacker who carries a katana with him everywhere. His name is Hiro Protagonist. Seriously. If that's a bit too silly sounding, this book is not for you, but if part of your brain just went "heh, rad" then you need to read this thing.

 

 

Oh yeah - I've read that one too.  I really enjoyed it - some of my techno-friends scoffed at the absurdity of some of the tech in the book - but I made the listen to R.E.A.S.O.N. :;):

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Just finished "The Clone," for the second time in more than thirty years.


 


Paperback. Found it on Amazon at a reasonable price. Terrible old pulp novel I'd lost a million years ago. But the thing was... I remembered it. The last time I read the thing was when I was maybe thirteen, but it'd scared the beans out of me. This book was SCARY. As in "staying up too late because you're too antsy to sleep" scary.


 


Now, I had a few movies that shook me up when I was a little kid. When I was eight, I made the mistake of staying up late to watch an old British Dracula movie, and had a hard time falling asleep for WEEKS, firmly convinced that if I fell asleep, Christopher Lee was going to slither in the window and EAT me.


 


But out of every book I've ever read, this one was the only one that really gave me the chills. Stephen King was beginning his career when I was in high school, and I read everything he wrote... but NOTHING he or anyone else had ever done touched THIS book... and now, I was going to have a copy again. I was deathly curious to see if it was any good.


 


And it arrived in the mail and I read it. And oh, it was awful. Written in 1965, and with every flaw you'd expect from a pulp horror novel written in 1965. Written by Theodore Thomas and Kate Wilhelm, "The Clone" is about a slimy little thing that abiogenates in the Chicago sewers from some chemicals and a wad of rotten hamburger. It slops around consuming whatever it finds in the sewers, working its way outward from its origin point, getting bigger and bigger... and finally begins oozing out of drains, sinks, and bathtubs across downtown Chicago as it continues to grow and seek out organic material to absorb... Yeah. It's "The Blob," except that instead of moving around, it simply gets bigger and SPREADS. Pulp horror monster novel.


 


Scared the beans out of me when I was thirteen.  This time, I read it in a single afternoon.


 


And weirdly enough? The book does not frighten me. But the residual terror felt by a thirteen year old, 36 years ago, is enough to unsettle me, even now, as I write.


 


Wonder what my dreams will look like tonight? 


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Actually, you know what. There is 'something' I've been trying to read....my favorite author, F. Paul Wilson came to Georgia...god...like three years ago and signed my hardback copy of "The Dark at the End". I have just been reading the first chapter over and over again and setting it aside for a few months, pick it up again...rinse and repeat. It's the second to the last book of two of his series combining and I can't handle it. I've been reading his books since I was ten years old. I feel like if I finish these last two books, then the awesomeness that is Repairman Jack will be gone. 

 

I did some ...I don't even know what sort of reading to call it. I'm pretty sure my three year old nephew could read it. I have read all of David Wongs books and am surprisingly excited for the next one. They're pretty simplistic to read and you can finish one in a couple hours if you have the time and no distractions. They're pretty funny. Whoever is editing his books is doing great. (I want his editor) The first one was hard to get through,but the second one is much better written. 

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I just went to barnes and noble and bought a dozen free e-books (after making sure they weren't erotic fiction - an alarmingly high number of the free ones are!) and am going through them

 

They're all by people I've never heard of, and so far I've finished two that were apparently the first in serials, but I haven't decided if I'm invested enough to go for the next in the series.  I suppose if I do, the marketing gimmick of giving away the first one will have worked.

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Having decided that I needed something to read at work (it gets boring about 2am and no work to do) I went and looked at my shelves and found a copy of Gwenhwyfar: The White Spirit by Mercedes Lackey. As usual for her books, I gobbled that up in a couple nights. Which left my lacking for the rest of the week.

 

So now I'm reading Tam Lin by Pamela Dean. I've never actually read the original Tam Lin (which I should do probably), but this rendition of the tale is very good. It also has very long chapters. :blink:  Makes it hard to put down when I should stop reading at work.

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I needed something different, so I started reading The Aquitaine Progression by Ludlum. It's kind of interesting, enough to keep me reading; I'd like a bit more depth to it. It is chilling given that it was written in the 80s and is basically predicting the escalation of the War on Terror almost twenty years later.

 

Also reading a Haynes guide to small engine repair, I think my snow thrower might be asking me for a new carb. But I'm fairly ignorant about engines but exceedingly good at taking things apart and putting them back together in working order...

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I'm reading the collected "Adventure Time" comics. They hold up as well as the show, which I guess is part of why they've won an Eisner award. Humor, wit, and postapocalyptic surrealism. For kids.

 

And it arrived in the mail and I read it. And oh, it was awful. Written in 1965, and with every flaw you'd expect from a pulp horror novel written in 1965. Written by Theodore Thomas and Kate Wilhelm ...

 

Kate Wilhelm?

 

Of Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang?

 

::(:

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Well, Tam Lin had the original ballad at the back of the book. Quite a satasfying read ^_^

 

 

Now I need something else to read... maybe I'll just bring The History of Western Philosopy and read that. Should take me a week or so :lol:

 

 

Also reading a Haynes guide to small engine repair, I think my snow thrower might be asking me for a new carb. But I'm fairly ignorant about engines but exceedingly good at taking things apart and putting them back together in working order...

I tried reading one of those at work. Put me right to sleep! (Don't tell my boss that though :ph34r: )

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I just finished Hellraisers (by Robert Sellers) about Burton, O'Tool, Reed and Harris.  I bought this just after Peter O'Tool's passing, last month.

 

Thank Cromm I don't know any drunks.  Reading some of their violent and embarrassing drunken antics I can't help but wonder if the alcoholism was only a symptom of another neurological disease.

 

Next up: 'Hellraisers of Hollywood'.

'You all meet in a pub' will never be the same again...

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