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I enjoyed the first half dozen MYTH books, then I pretty quickly lost interest.

 

@pcktlnt I have enjoyed a surprising number of YA novels. I have two teenage nieces, so they pretty regularly recommend me things to read. Some I enjoy, some are a bit to much like a how to guide for teen angst.

 

If any of you enjoy the steampunk/gothic horror style I recommend the Johannes Cabal books, though for some reason he seems to be waiting to release them in the US a year after they release in the UK.

 

Last night I picked up the most recent copy of "Traditional Bowhunter Magazine." It has a really good article on knapping arrowheads from glass, for any of you who are interested in that sort of thing. I also believe the gentleman who wrote the article has a Youtube video that parallels it.

Since we have so much glass around (glass-blowing studio), my in-laws have been practicing knapping for some time. It can be a lot of fun, and you can get some really nice points. I'll recommend the mag to 'em.

 

-Dave

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I am eagerly awaiting the next Dresden book, but I found the first one of Codex Alara (Alera?) to be pretty disappointing, didn't bother with any more of those.

 

At the moment I'm looking for stuff to read and this thread had heaps of things so I'm off to check a few of them out.

 

Also there's a new Matthew Reilly book out in November which should be exciting. He does some good throw away fluff.

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Let's see, the last one I read was Little Myth... uhh... the one with the little girl. And the "moll". Which reminds me that I want to find out where that word comes from, cause it's an odd name for a mistress. Mobsters are weird.

 

Anyway, he's missing the one that comes after that one. I've been meaning to go to our local paperback store (an awesome store, it smells like BOOKS) and look for it, but it's difficult to find there. Plus, as this post amply demonstrates, I'm forgetful. :down:

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Let's see, the last one I read was Little Myth... uhh... the one with the little girl. And the "moll". Which reminds me that I want to find out where that word comes from, cause it's an odd name for a mistress. Mobsters are weird.

 

Anyway, he's missing the one that comes after that one. I've been meaning to go to our local paperback store (an awesome store, it smells like BOOKS) and look for it, but it's difficult to find there. Plus, as this post amply demonstrates, I'm forgetful. :down:

If I remember my Etymology right (and it's very possible I'm wrong) it's a old slang term used to denote a prostitute. I'm not sure where I read that though, so I'll have to do some checking.

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Curious, does anyone read young adult novels? Such as Pendragon, Percy Jackson, Paladin, etc.? I find them to be easy reads, but also very engaging (despite the upcoming of age hero trope).

 

I read YA every once in a while. My favorites are the old Heinlein juveniles (Podkayne of Mars, Have Spacesuit – Will Travel, Tunnel in the Sky, ...), though they're showing their age a bit.

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Let's see, the last one I read was Little Myth... uhh... the one with the little girl. And the "moll". Which reminds me that I want to find out where that word comes from, cause it's an odd name for a mistress. Mobsters are weird.

 

Anyway, he's missing the one that comes after that one. I've been meaning to go to our local paperback store (an awesome store, it smells like BOOKS) and look for it, but it's difficult to find there. Plus, as this post amply demonstrates, I'm forgetful. :down:

To http://www.etymonline.com,

Moll dictionary.gif female proper name, shortened form of Molly, itself familiar for Mary. Used from c.1600 for "prostitute;" meaning "companion of a thief" is first recorded 1823. U.S. sense of "a gangster's girlfriend" is from 1923.
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The first book of the Codex Alera was Jim Butcher's first novel. The second book was written after many Dresden Files books. There's a difference in skill and experience. ^_^

 

That is the most interesting fact I've heard all week and I shall definitely check them out again.

 

He should put that on the front cover ;p

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Latest YA novel I read was Vodnik by Bryce Moore. He is the head of the Maine Library association and was a panelist at several Conneticon events.

 

I quite liked it. The story revolved around a teen than moved back to Slovakia with his parents after spending most of his life in American. Once there he realizes that he can see supernatural creatures and the weirdness commences.

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"The Emperor's General", a fact based novel centered around General Douglas MacArthur, mostly after the end of WWII, as Allied forces take control of Japan. I'm half-way through it and it's GREAT!!!
The author is James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy.
Highly recommended, highly!

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The last YA novel I read was "I Shall Wear Midnight" by Pratchett. Ach, Crivens!

 

I just finished up "Swords and Deviltry" yesterday, and I'm moving on to the next in the series. Also I discovered that Mike Mignola and Howard Chaykin did a comic adaptation of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser, and it's pretty amazing.

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I'm halfway through The Crowded Grave, the fourth book of Martin Walker's Bruno Chief of Police mystery series. They are delightful books, set in southern France, very well-written, with an interesting set of characters. Lots of history (I learned things in the first book about WWII and the French-Algerian wars that they never taught us in school) and food along with the mystery. Walker lives in the region at least part-time and has captured the French sensibility beautifully. The books make me want to sit outside a French cafe with coffee and croissants and ponder what sort of dark doings are happening behind the picturesque streets. Highly recommend the series!

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I just pulled out a stack of books by A. C. Crispin, multitalented author of many fine science fiction original and tie-in novels, including some of the best Star Wars, Star Trek, and Pirates of the Caribbean books ever.

 

She just died, of bladder cancer, too young.

 

She also ran a website for authors and aspiring authors, giving excellent advice about scammy publishers and predatory practices. She was one amazing lady, and will be much missed.

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I went through a trilogy marathon of Zahn's Cobra Trilogy, had to read it faster then my normal pace because it was an ILL (yay testing new OPAC I'm setting up!). If those letters are meaningless, you need to spend more time at the library.

 

A third of the way into my other ILL, Banks' Against a Dark Background, which is pretty awesome. Might be my favorite Banks yet.

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