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JDWiker

Prepping Bones Minis: Buffing Block?

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I started painting my first Bones mini last night (Mister Bones, appropriately enough), and I was able to use an X-Acto knife, needle files, and my trusty sanding sponge to fairly good effect, but because the sanding sponge is made for wood or metal, it was a bit crude for the task.

Then I remembered these things:

http://www.amazon.com/COSM-TRIM-Trim-Buffing-Block/dp/B001TSNGF8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1377113332&sr=8-1&keywords=trim+buffing+block

 

I went out at lunchtime just now and picked one up at my neighborhood Target for about $2.50, and I'm going to try it out tonight.

Has anyone used one of these on plastic minis before? Any suggestions for technique, or warnings about what to expect?

Cheers.

 

JD

 

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Not the blocks, but I have noticed that some of the sanding boards sold at hobby shops are very similar to nail buffing sticks, just often cut down to narrower forms. The nail buffers are certainly cheaper, but I have trouble thinking of a tool to use to cut them down to a usable size without trashing its blade on the abrasive surface.

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Not the blocks, but I have noticed that some of the sanding boards sold at hobby shops are very similar to nail buffing sticks, just often cut down to narrower forms. The nail buffers are certainly cheaper, but I have trouble thinking of a tool to use to cut them down to a usable size without trashing its blade on the abrasive surface.

I would suggest a good pair of kitchen shears.

 

-Dave

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Not the blocks, but I have noticed that some of the sanding boards sold at hobby shops are very similar to nail buffing sticks, just often cut down to narrower forms. The nail buffers are certainly cheaper, but I have trouble thinking of a tool to use to cut them down to a usable size without trashing its blade on the abrasive surface.

I would suggest a good pair of kitchen shears.

 

-Dave

 

But would they REMAIN a good pair of shears?

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I have used the sanding needles on Bones. In fact I gave some away at Rcon. I use the medium and the fine at the moment, though I am thinking of testing the coarse.

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Sanding needles have been tested to work on Bones (not by me, however). I have tested them on metal, and they work on that. I found mine at Hobby Lobby with the model paints and accessories.

 

^^^This^^^

 

I have used the sanding needles on Bones. In fact I gave some away at Rcon. I use the medium and the fine at the moment, though I am thinking of testing the coarse.

 

 

They work like a charm on Bones for getting those pesky mold lines off. They're also great on metal, plastic, and on GW finecast resin.

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I've been using a set of diamond rotary burrs in a 1/8in pin vise as files, and they've been doing quite well for me on Bones. But, however long and pointy some of them are, they're all round, and I do see a need for flat and angled abrasives that those don't quite provide.

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Not the blocks, but I have noticed that some of the sanding boards sold at hobby shops are very similar to nail buffing sticks, just often cut down to narrower forms. The nail buffers are certainly cheaper, but I have trouble thinking of a tool to use to cut them down to a usable size without trashing its blade on the abrasive surface.

I would suggest a good pair of kitchen shears.

 

-Dave

 

But would they REMAIN a good pair of shears?

 

They might; we abuse the crap out of our pair, and re-sharpening them seems to work ok.

-Dave

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I can third the awesomeness of sanding needles. I went from starting out trying to take off mold lines with some super cheap needle files that only worked on broad flat surfaces, to an Xacto knife which was better but not great at tiny detail spots, to the sanding needles which are what I use currently (as well as the Xacto knife). The fine and medium work the best; I got the coarse to try them out, and they just don't seem to work as well as the finer ones. Maybe they're too coarse for the tiny fine mold lines, but they just didn't seem to be removing the lines as readily as the finer ones. So, whatever I would need a coarse file for, the Xacto knife handles a lot more smoothly.

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

 

EDIT: I should have specified that the above is only true with regards to Bones, since I have exactly zero experience with any other material. ^_^

Edited by OneBoot
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I tried out the buffing block last night, and had moderate success:

 

  1. The block is an inch wide, so it's hard to get it into small spaces.
  2. The block's texture is very fine, meaning it takes a lot of buffing to get rid of large amounts of flash (even after using an X-Acto to trim the flash down a bit). Something between a buffing block and a sanding sponge seems to be the ticket.
  3. On large, relatively flat areas, however, the buffing block worked fine. I used it on Mister Bones' cloak, and it not only removed the remaining traces of flash, but smoothed out the area overall.

So, for trimming/sanding largish areas, I'd recommend X-Acto, then file, then sanding sponge, then *maybe* buffing block.

But, for $2.50, it's not a *bad* tool to have in your Bones toolkit. It's just not as versatile as other tools.

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