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Mordarby

What do you put your mini on when painting it?

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Oneboot, bless you. :wub: I thought I was the last one who remembered those little black cylinders.

I have a boxful ... somewhere. I have never used one for a mini though.

 

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I have used these things a few times for minis.

Does anybody know why they are always Amber? is that a law?

 

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Bane-of-H: you have given me a reason to visit McDonalds again.

 

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...I've noticed some folks are using wood blocks. Are these just custom made or are these blocks people are buying somewhere? If so, where? I'd like to get my hands on some...
Mord: One of the sculptors explained the making of those at ReaperCon. I think he attributed the first one to Bobby Jackson. Those are made from any suitable piece of scrap lumber. (If you don't have any means of chopping lumber into smallish blocks a craft store can help you out with some small blocks.) Step 1 is to obtain pairs of small wooden blocks.
Then take two blocks of identical size.
Drill a hole maybe 1/4 diameter through both blocks (simultaneously - to be sure the hole lines up).
Visit hardware store, purchase:
  • One machine bolt
  • Two fender washers
  • One wingnut
  • One (optional) lockwasher.

Assemble in this order:

  • Machine bolt
  • Fender washer
  • Block 1
  • Block 2
  • Fender washer
  • Lockwasher (optional)
  • Wingnut

This item works extremely well for slotted minis that have not been based or minis that have pins in their feet.

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Huh. I learn something new every day.

 

Oneboot, bless you. :wub: I thought I was the last one who remembered those little black cylinders.

 

I'm young old-school. :B):

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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I use wooden spools with blue tack. Sometimes if a mini has a dodgy base (or no base) I'll glue cork to the spool, drill holes in the model's feet, glue some sewing pins that I've cut down into the holes and stick them in the cork.

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I use wooden dowels, about half-inch diameter, and about three inches long. They're long enough to hold in my hand at various angles without much effort so I can turn the mini upside down or sideways if necessary, and they're heavy enough that their weight tends to balance out the weight of most human-sized minis, leading to less stress on my fingers. I use a drop of cyanoacrylate glue to hold them in place, and after I seal them I just slide a hobby knife inbetween the base and the dowel and give it a little twist to pop it off. I bought the first couple of dowels I use in a bag of wood scraps I got at a craft store, along with a sort-of-doorknob-shaped piece with a flat bottom and a hole drilled through it that's the perfect diameter for placing the dowels in when I'm not painting.

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I've just discovered that three of the prescription bottles I've been using have those reversible caps. Now I, too, can move my minis in progress around from place to place and shield them on the way. Wai!

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With all the pill bottles being mentioned in this thread one has to wonder is a certain government agency are now tracking all of us.

 

Actually, there are two: HHS (Health and Human Services) and the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) ... support ObamaCare :devil: take your meds ... the government is watching us all.

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I use either corks or old 9 V batteries, depending on the size or the miniature. Usually wood glue. I was the recipient of the great family cork donation of 2011. Mainly because at the time I was planning on making a giant cork hot plate that would hold at least 2 pies, which it does, btw. But it also means I will never run out of corks for miniature use now!

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I thrifted several sets of Jenga blocks at the thrift store. So I use that and a combination of poster tape (double-sided tape) for the bones.

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I use the Clear Cap off a can of shaving cream with a little tacky putty (called Duct Seal) that I picked up at local hardware store). I can hold the cap and move it around easily, and then stand it back up to let it dry.

The photos I posted show the minis on my caps.

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I use a wooden candle stick and turn it upside down to put the tacky stuff and attach the miniature on the bottom. It fits in my hand nicely and works for me.

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I have never, ever, had a metal mini that would stay in place with tack and I've tried 4 different types. I don't know what sorcery you people use to do so.

 

Mastic tape

 

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I use empty dice boxes for minis with bases.

 

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If a model has multiple parts, I like to paint each piece individually, glue it together, then touch everything up. I'll either leave the parts attached to a bit of sprue or use a pair of jeweler's pliers. I rubber-band the handles together so I don't drop the piece.

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I'm just curious how strong some of these methods are to angling the miniature up to 90 degrees?

 

Glue seems like the strongest method short of pinning, but it is a bit extreme to me even though it may not be realistically that hard to remove.

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