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Creature Size vs Base Size vs Miniature Size

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Ok. No idea where this discussion should go, hope this is ok here.

 

So I am trying to get a standard basing size / strategy together. I just wanted to know what other people do for gaming especially in RPG's that use miniatures. Also some of the problems I have comes across. So firstly I am trying to sync up a creatures physical size in its stats vs its HD (d&d etc) vs its physical miniature size. The CL relates to Swords and Wizardry challenge level. That's the system I want to use. We got the PDF from the KS. I really like the old skool feel :)

 

So far I have:

 

Bases

 

Small - 20mm <4'

Medium - 25mm 4' to 9'

Large - 50mm - 9' to 18ft

Large to huge - 75mm 18ft to 30'

Huge to Colossus - Custom / 100mm 30'+

 

Creatures (Bones)

 

Kobolds / goblins - 20mm base

Adventurers - 25mm base

Kagunk Ogre Boss - CL4/HD4/9' tall therefore a 50mm base - great

Ettin - CL11?/HD10/13' tall therefore a 50mm base - great

1 x Deathsleet - CL?/HD5-7/24' therefore 75mm base - great

 

Then I hit a wild card!

 

Owlbear - CL5/HD5/8'' tall - Medium base, nope needs a 50mm base he's massive Bones mini.

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Oooo, owlbear!

 

I actually used my owlbear in a 3.5 encounter right after my vampire box arrived. (Dungeon Crawl Classics module, they're awesome!) They had classified the owlbear as large, which means 50mm base size. That seems to fit very nicely with the actual size of the mini.

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I'm trying to base stuff roughly suitable for skirmish games, and let DnD take care of itself :)

This.

 

Most my figure are going on 1 inch square bases for the odd chance that I get to play Warlord sometime in the next decade. As far as RPGs, I've spent most of my time playing on hex maps so I'm used to going with non-exact base sizes (unless I'm playing BattleTech in which case I'm good).

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I gave up looking for square bases larger thn 40mm. I just jumped to round 60mm for the Giants, Red Dragon, and those huge demons. So far so good.

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I gave up looking for square bases larger thn 40mm. I just jumped to round 60mm for the Giants, Red Dragon, and those huge demons. So far so good.

I need to upload photos but tonight I sculpted dungeon: 3x 50, 2x 75 and 1x 100mm square bases on MDF laser cut 3mm using green stuff. Going to buy silicon and make resin bases! Adventure!!

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I used to base everything on circles.

 

25mm standard

30mm for somewhat larger

40 and 50mm for big stuff

 

Sometimes figs would end up on a 30mm just due to the sculpt even if it wasn't any more powerful than other models on 25mm. These figs were mostly being used in Song of Blades and Heroes. SBH measurements are from front of base to back of base. That means that larger based models move a but further each turn. However, much of combat revolves around outnumbering your opponents, so bigger bases also give your opponents the ability to get more models into combat with the mini in question. It's a nice pair of mechanics that balance out nicely.

 

Now that I've been working on fantasy armies, I've been basing them with respect to Kings of War.

Most foot models goes on a 20mm square

Cavalry on 25x50

Bigger infantry and characters on 40mm squares

 

Interestingly this makes my figures fairly compatible with WHFB if I ever decide to try that game out.

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If I need a large rectangular base that I can't easily purchase, I cut it from MDF with a radial arm saw. You can get quite adequate precision pretty easily. (You can also cut off your fingers, but hey, everything has a price. ^_^ )

 

For round bases, a drill with a hole saw works pretty well on either MDF or thin plywood. You do have to measure the inside of the saw, since they're specified by the diameter of the hole they create rather than the diameter of the blank they cut out, of course, which can make things tricky if you're especially interested in precise sizes.

 

FWIW, I attach magnets to the bases of all my figures to facilitate transportation and sabot* bases for units.

 

* Larger bases intended to hold multiple figures.

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Many of our medium sized brocoli don't fit on 1" squares. So I cut them up and force it to fit. I force them onto the 1" squares. I am grappling right now with the bones giants and what size bases they belong on for D&D.

 

I guess most of them will be large?

Frost Giants are 15 feet tall, 2800 lbs, so Large.

Fire Giants are 12 feet tall, has a chest that measures 9 feet around, and weighs about 7,000 pounds

 

Both are large in D&D, but So weigh more than large should. Hill and Stone giants look like they'll fit into large as well.

 

 

Cloud Giants are 18 feet tall and weigh about 5,000 pounds and huge.

Storm Giants are about 21 feet tall and weigh about 12,000 pounds, but still huge.

 

 

Large is 10' base size, so 2" round base, and is 8 to 16 feet tall while weighing from 500 lb. to 2 tons

Huge is 15' base size, so 3" round base, and is for a 16' - 32' feet tall creature

Edited by cthulhudarren

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(You can also cut off your fingers, but hey, everything has a price. ^_^ )

Rofl. :D....now i feel i should get therapy for laughing at this comment. ; )

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This issue has been one of the biggest learning curves for me as a new sculptor. I'm an old school RPG player, predating the use of minis in the game rules. We never worried about things like base size compared to the size of the mini when we started playing with minis, mostly I assume because there were no rules for it back then. With role-playing, minis are just placeholders and exact size restrictions on a grid always seemed odd to me. When I started sculpting, I just sculpted the minis at the size the book says they should be without any thought as to how they will fit onto a base. Then at ReaperCon, I had a conversation with some Reaper Peeps where it became obvious that this was indeed an issue. One sculpt in particular is my Iron Cobra which according to some rules is Medium and should be on a 25 mm base. It would have needed to be coiled up to do that, and frankly, I hadn't thought of it. As sculpted, it fits on a cavalry base. Now the cobra itself is the right size based on the description, but its pose is such that it won't fit on a 1" square. Oops!

 

So the challenge for us sculptors is making dynamically-posed, interesting-looking models that still fit within the box.

Edited by TaleSpinner
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This issue has been one of the biggest learning curves for me as a new sculptor. I'm an old school RPG player, predating the use of minis in the game rules. We never worried about things like base size compared to the size of the mini when we started playing with minis, mostly I assume because there were no rules for it back then. With role-playing, minis are just placeholders and exact size restrictions on a grid always seemed odd to me. When I started sculpting, I just sculpted the minis at the size the book says they should be without any thought as to how they will fit onto a base. Then at ReaperCon, I had a conversation with some Reaper Peeps where it became obvious that this was indeed an issue. One sculpt in particular is my Iron Cobra which according to some rules is Medium and should be on a 25 mm base. It would have needed to be coiled up to do that, and frankly, I hadn't thought of it. As sculpted, it fits on a cavalry base. Now the cobra itself is the right size based on the description, but its pose is such that it won't fit on a 1" square. Oops!

 

So the challenge for us sculptors is making dynamically-posed, interesting-looking models that still fit within the box.

 

I feel ya on this. Personally I don't like having to put a big@ss base on my RPG minis. It makes them harder to use in cluttered (and therefore awesome) terrain. On the other hand they do provide much needed stability as most minis have a tough time standing on their own.

 

As for the Iron Cobra I would have no issue whatsoever putting it on a cavalry base. That makes perfect sense to me. I put my Kelpies on calvlry bases as I tend to 'install' them against walls or in front of doors. I just made sense that way.

 

The new bones Hydra on the other hand will get no base at all. It's too big and can stand on it's own with zero help.

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Do any of you ever base minis by giving --each foot-- a separate base? (In this instance "minis" means things considered Ogre size and up...)

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Do any of you ever base minis by giving --each foot-- a separate base? (In this instance "minis" means things considered Ogre size and up...)

Would look like they are going ogre skiing? Have you done this?

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