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Does Reaper Brush on Sealer go bad?


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Hello all

 

I just sealed four Bones Mini's, five minutes ago but as I was working with the Reaper Brush On Sealer I noticed something that hasn't happened before.

 

The sealer was foamy but I thought that was just from giving it a good shake. I used it and in some places I noticed it has changed the color of my paint. It looks like it was a deposit of sealer that didn't get brushed properly. But it dried flat and just changed the color from a blue/black to a grey/brown.

 

Also I used a gloss paint(not reaper paint) for part of a mini and the sealer pulled the gloss off. I could brush a soft dry brush over the area and little flakes of sealer/gloss came of the area.

 

I haven't had any problems before and actually I used the same bottle nearly a week ago for sealing. The only change is the bottle might have been in direct sunlight for 12-14 hours over two days. But even then I've left the bottle in the sunlight before without incident.

 

Any thoughts?

 

thanks for the help

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The sealer needs to be shaken quite vigourously to mix the different components equally throughout the bottle. It also needs to be shaken that way for every use throughout the life of the entire bottle to work best. So if it's possible that you didn't shake it much on each use and you're now nearing the bottom third of the bottle, what's likely happened is that there is now a greater proportion of the matting agent in the mix. Matte sealers make things look matte because they have little particles in them that scatter the light reflecting off of the object more randomly. But those little particles aren't really clear like straight sealer, so if you spray a matte spray sealer too heavily or fail to shake a brush sealer consistently, you can get a situation where the particles build up enough to start creating a visible film that might change the appearance of the colour of the paint, or even appear as a film or mist/fog on top of the paint.

 

Sometimes people have been able to restore similar issues by covering it over with a gloss sealer and then a properly used matte sealer on top of that, or with Dullcote spray you can sometimes lightly spray again later and fix it up, but those are more usually related to spraying sealer when it's too damp out. You could try reading through the forums or doing some searches to find some of the threads where people talk about their experiences and see if any of the tricks tried look like they could work for you.

 

I don't use sealer as much as many people do. I don't seal Bones at all, my experience has been that the paint jobs are pretty sturdy. (I use MSPs and usually paint on to washed Bones, though I've also tested with straight from the package ones.) And by pretty sturdy, I mean I've thrown them loose in a box or bag and carried them around as well as general game night handling.

 

I don't have direct experience to offer on what's going on with the gloss paint you used. A lot of different paints use a lot of different chemicals, you may just have stumbled on a mixture of paint, sealer and/or surface (not clear if that figure was Bones or not) that don't play well together.

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Thanks for the advice. I think I'll look into getting a gloss sealer at least to try and keep the shine for my Bones Spider Demoness (which I had the problem with)

 

I can always just repaint my other figure and trying sealing again to see if maybe I'm just at the end of the bottle life and I should start another one.

 

Thanks again. I was just wondering if anyone else had run into similar problems.

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You can also test your bottle just painting on to a flat area of paint like a base edge. If you see a film even after shaking it a bunch, you might need to get a new bottle and be more consistent about shaking it through the life of the bottle.

 

The good news is that the end of your bad bottle is not just trash. Another great use for Reaper brush-on sealer is to smooth out problems on a surface. This is more common with metal miniatures, but happens sometimes with Bones. On a metal miniature you can get areas that look a little pitted, especially in the folds of thick cloaks or dresses. Or maybe you slip a bit when getting rid of mould lines on a Bones and have some scratches. Paint a few layers of the brush on sealer over a problem area like that and then a coat of paint, and the surface will look much smoother. I've even used it to disguise shallow mould lines or fill in small holes and such. It's nice because you can use it as a fix even if you don't notice the problem until after you're painting.

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The good news is that the end of your bad bottle is not just trash. Another great use for Reaper brush-on sealer is to smooth out problems on a surface. This is more common with metal miniatures, but happens sometimes with Bones. On a metal miniature you can get areas that look a little pitted, especially in the folds of thick cloaks or dresses. Or maybe you slip a bit when getting rid of mould lines on a Bones and have some scratches. Paint a few layers of the brush on sealer over a problem area like that and then a coat of paint, and the surface will look much smoother. I've even used it to disguise shallow mould lines or fill in small holes and such. It's nice because you can use it as a fix even if you don't notice the problem until after you're painting.

 

I use liquid green stuff for this. Thinned of course.

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There are a few other products that work, too. You can make a slurry out of water and Milliput or Apoxie Sculpt, though that is best sanded. The sealer is nice because it's easy to use even if you don't discover the problem until after you've put a fair bit of paint on something, as it's transparent, so less to worry about as far as getting on a finished area accidentally and stuff. Liquid greenstuff is probably very similar to (if not pretty much exactly the same as) Golden or Liquitex modeling pastes, so people who already have fine arts supplies on hand might find it useful for similar purposes.

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