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I still swear by Future floor polish (now called Pledge with Future Shine) for gloss coats on miniatures and scale models. The stuff is bulletproof and accepts matt coats easily.

 

The Egg

 

I know many hobbyists swear by it, but Future floor polish is floor polish.

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But isn't the top layer of paint essentially watercolour anyways? You're probably glazing or throwing washes down that are 3:1 or more water-to-paint.,,,

 

In the event that I want to use an Acrylic sealant...what's out there? AFAIK Testors Gloss/Dullcote is a lacquer-based sealant, so I'm not sure why it's become "industry standard" if it's the wrong chemical formulation...

The hobby paint industry evolved out of oil-based enamels for plastic vehicular kits. Many of the industry standard formulations are a legacy of that time. People keep on using those products because that's what they've always used since their grandfather taught them how to build a toy boat and that's what he used and stuff like that and it still seems to work well enough and that's OK. If It's a technique you're used to and it gets results you like there's no reason to change.

 

It is very difficult to thin out acrylic so much that it is resoluble (except if it contains dioxazine purple), but it is vulnerable to abrasions and other handling damage. The micro-porosity can trap smoke and other fine particles, and will absorb water and lift if left soaking for an extended period of time.

 

You may have to step away from the hobby paints into the artists aisle. There you'll find bottles of milky-looking liquid marked Acrylic Medium and/or Varnish. Gloss has no additives, while matte has a translucent pigment (usually talc) as a matting agent. Most likely you'll find Liquitex brand, and maybe Golden or Winsor&Newton. Or among the craft paints Ceramcoat, Americana, Apple Barrel, and Folk Art brands there are also acrylic varnishes.

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I still swear by Future floor polish (now called Pledge with Future Shine) for gloss coats on miniatures and scale models. The stuff is bulletproof and accepts matt coats easily.

 

The Egg

 

I know many hobbyists swear by it, but Future floor polish is floor polish.

 

 

Future is acrylic plus solvent and plasticizer. Which is to say, it's acrylic gloss medium.

 

Make sure the label says Ranger rather than Fighter with Bow, though, if you're picky.

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I still swear by Future floor polish (now called Pledge with Future Shine) for gloss coats on miniatures and scale models. The stuff is bulletproof and accepts matt coats easily.

 

The Egg

 

I know many hobbyists swear by it, but Future floor polish is floor polish.

Some swear by it, and some swear at it...
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Yay information.

 

Is there a difference between the "hardiness" of a matte acrylic varnish and a gloss acrylic varnish? I'll probably grab both (because shiny things should be shiny) but I want to know if I should be "Bullet coating" my minis or if that's a thing of the past as well.

 

They've got to withstand a bit of rough 'n' tumble from the occasional drop on the floor or table, but I won't be idly tossing them in my trunk to bounce around as I go cross-country or anything.

 

Edit: Also, would it be okay to use, say, Liquitex Semi-gloss acrylic and then spray with Testors Dullcote over top of that?

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I still swear by Future floor polish (now called Pledge with Future Shine) for gloss coats on miniatures and scale models. The stuff is bulletproof and accepts matt coats easily.

 

The Egg

 

 

I do, too - but I haven't used it for Bones. It's not very flexible when dry, what dries around the cap splinters away when I clear the nozzle.

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Matte varnish has a rougher surface than gloss varnish for the purpose of scattering reflected light. This rough surface is more apt to catch on other things and pull away.

The surface hardness has more to do with the particular formulation of the varnish than does the finish.

 

Some glossy acrylics have a cohesive affinity. Your figures should be fine if they are kept in separate foam-lined cells in a carry-case, but might stick together even after having dried long ago if left in prolonged contact, such as if less-than-carefully placed on a display shelf.

 

There's lots of reading material over here:

http://www.goldenpaints.com/technicaldata/varnishresources.php

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So given that I really don't want to read umpteen technical documents, what do you do to seal your minis, and does this protect them from minor scrapes and bumps?

 

Edit: I should be clear, that if these things are going to stick to each other if I use acrylic varnish, then that's a no-no. They're Bones. They go in a bag when I am done with them, not some fancy-shmansy box lined with foam. If they're lucky (or really flaky) then they'll be wrapped up with a cotton sheet or something for long term storage. I want a low-maintenance solution.

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Use a coat of gloss varnish, followed by a coat of matte varnish. If you're intent on handling any painted miniature roughly, you'll have to expect them needing the occasional touch-up. Early experiments with Bones figures have shown that paint sticks to them very well, but even they, under rough conditions, will show minor chipping on high surface points.

 

I have a plan to try something using EVA (craft foam) to make my own mini packing peanuts and see how Bones survive packed in that. I'll have a report on that if I ever get around to it.

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I still swear by Future floor polish (now called Pledge with Future Shine) for gloss coats on miniatures and scale models. The stuff is bulletproof and accepts matt coats easily.

 

The Egg

 

 

I do, too - but I haven't used it for Bones. It's not very flexible when dry, what dries around the cap splinters away when I clear the nozzle.

 

 

I rather like the lack of flexibility actually, as it makes the Bones figs that much sturdier and resistant to paint damage when they're handled. Sure, you can't treat them roughly like children's toys - but why would anyone want to spend all that time painting these miniatures just to abuse them by cramming them into a bag like so many Army Men?

 

The Egg

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I usually use one coat of gloss acrylic varnish, and a top coat of matte. I find that matte acrylics only go on properly matte through the airbrush; when I brush them on, they always seems to cure to a satin finish, no matter how much they're stirred.

 

Tamiya's matting agent (X-21, I think) works well to knock back any shine left in acrylic varnish. I've added it successfully to water-soluble polyurethane, which gives a very tough, hard-wearing sealant.

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I still swear by Future floor polish (now called Pledge with Future Shine) for gloss coats on miniatures and scale models. The stuff is bulletproof and accepts matt coats easily.

 

The Egg

 

 

I do, too - but I haven't used it for Bones. It's not very flexible when dry, what dries around the cap splinters away when I clear the nozzle.

I rather like the lack of flexibility actually, as it makes the Bones figs that much sturdier and resistant to paint damage when they're handled. Sure, you can't treat them roughly like children's toys - but why would anyone want to spend all that time painting these miniatures just to abuse them by cramming them into a bag like so many Army Men?

 

The Egg

What about those of us that paint with their kids? (Like my three year old) I need a better sealer than glosscoat -dullcote for Bones to face battle with Barbie and her My Little Pony army of doom.
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I still swear by Future floor polish (now called Pledge with Future Shine) for gloss coats on miniatures and scale models. The stuff is bulletproof and accepts matt coats easily.

 

The Egg

 

I do, too - but I haven't used it for Bones. It's not very flexible when dry, what dries around the cap splinters away when I clear the nozzle.

I rather like the lack of flexibility actually, as it makes the Bones figs that much sturdier and resistant to paint damage when they're handled. Sure, you can't treat them roughly like children's toys - but why would anyone want to spend all that time painting these miniatures just to abuse them by cramming them into a bag like so many Army Men?

 

The Egg

What about those of us that paint with their kids? (Like my three year old) I need a better sealer than glosscoat -dullcote for Bones to face battle with Barbie and her My Little Pony army of doom.

 

 

Kids nothing: There are plenty of full-grown gamers out there who still need to be taught how to properly handle a miniature during a game. So far, I haven't found anybody who wasn't willing to learn that, but I have encountered many who hadn't yet.

 

As for the rest...

I know there are a number of artists who caution against Future, but I do use it occasionally as a supplemental thinner, or spot gloss sealer. For actual sealing, I use Testor's Gloss/Dull formulations.

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To summarise: matte varnish can absorb all sorts of nasties, and is also prone to damage. Highest protection is obtained using a gloss varnish. This can then be over-coated with a matte varnish to reduce the shine.

 

In effect, matte varnish is more porous than gloss varnish. Additionally, or so I hear, matte varnish will slowly rub off with frequent handling. If it is over a gloss coat, the area losing matte varnish becomes glossy, and can then be hit with matte varnish again.

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