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Protecting Bones


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I still swear by Future floor polish (now called Pledge with Future Shine) for gloss coats on miniatures and scale models. The stuff is bulletproof and accepts matt coats easily.

 

The Egg

 

I do, too - but I haven't used it for Bones. It's not very flexible when dry, what dries around the cap splinters away when I clear the nozzle.

I rather like the lack of flexibility actually, as it makes the Bones figs that much sturdier and resistant to paint damage when they're handled. Sure, you can't treat them roughly like children's toys - but why would anyone want to spend all that time painting these miniatures just to abuse them by cramming them into a bag like so many Army Men?

 

The Egg

What about those of us that paint with their kids? (Like my three year old) I need a better sealer than glosscoat -dullcote for Bones to face battle with Barbie and her My Little Pony army of doom.

 

 

That one I can't answer - I have yet to find anything that is 100% childproof. And I don't fancy your chances against the Dread Princess Barbie. She's a butt kicker . . . .

 

The Egg

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I still swear by Future floor polish (now called Pledge with Future Shine) for gloss coats on miniatures and scale models. The stuff is bulletproof and accepts matt coats easily.

 

The Egg

 

I do, too - but I haven't used it for Bones. It's not very flexible when dry, what dries around the cap splinters away when I clear the nozzle.

I rather like the lack of flexibility actually, as it makes the Bones figs that much sturdier and resistant to paint damage when they're handled. Sure, you can't treat them roughly like children's toys - but why would anyone want to spend all that time painting these miniatures just to abuse them by cramming them into a bag like so many Army Men?

 

The Egg

What about those of us that paint with their kids? (Like my three year old) I need a better sealer than glosscoat -dullcote for Bones to face battle with Barbie and her My Little Pony army of doom.

 

 

Kids nothing: There are plenty of full-grown gamers out there who still need to be taught how to properly handle a miniature during a game. So far, I haven't found anybody who wasn't willing to learn that, but I have encountered many who hadn't yet.

 

As for the rest...

I know there are a number of artists who caution against Future, but I do use it occasionally as a supplemental thinner, or spot gloss sealer. For actual sealing, I use Testor's Gloss/Dull formulations.

 

 

I'm curious. What are the specific problems with Future that these artists have noted? I have honestly never had an issue with it - and this is after almost 20 years of constant use as a hobbyist.

 

The Egg

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OK,

I read all these responses and am very confused. Can someone explain it to me like I'm five? I want to end up with a sealed, protected, matt finish that will stand up to being kept in bags for RPG sessions.

 

My own caveat is that I do not want to spray ANYTHING. It's too humid 90% of the time.

 

TIA,

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OK,

I read all these responses and am very confused. Can someone explain it to me like I'm five? I want to end up with a sealed, protected, matt finish that will stand up to being kept in bags for RPG sessions.

 

My own caveat is that I do not want to spray ANYTHING. It's too humid 90% of the time.

 

TIA,

 

Honestly, I can't think of any option that I'd be satisfied with given the parameters you've given. At least not off hand. The flexing in the Bones material is troublesome for any kind of brush-on sealer as it is going to flake off - especially if the're going to be bag stored - whenever the material is shifted.

 

The Egg

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My best suggestion, if you're determined to bag the minis, would be one of:

 

1) Paint with acrylics following the best practices posts here (boil for straightening, wash with toothbrush and detergent, don't touch the figure while you're painting, start with an undiluted base coat covers most of it). Stop.

 

2) Paint as usual, gloss coat with either acrylic gloss medium (which might be Future) or polyurethane, dull the figure with brush-on Dullcote (because it's the consensus best dulling coating available).

 

Neither is guaranteed; both depend on the specific batch of plastic in the mini you painted. I'd try both to find out which works best in your application.

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I'm now confused is dullcote not a varnish? I thought it was. So in reality why your saying is they need a standard varnish followed by dullcote?

 

In terms of polymer coatings, a varnish is basically a paint base without any pigment, though it may have a matting agent or other modifiers to make it more protective. In modern usage, the word is almost interchangeable with "clearcoat" and "sealant".

 

In more traditional media, the term "varnish" refers to a class of resins including damar and mastic that are largely incompatible with lacquer and shellac. I'd have to dig out the technical papers on oil painting and wood finishes to really explain it all, as that's not really something I do enough to know about in detail.

 

But anyway, there are arguments that a gloss varnish is inherently stronger because , lacking a pigment, it creates a continuous polymer film once dried. The matting agent in a matte varnish may cause it to be more fragile, but its surface imperfections allow it to scatter reflected light, which is the desired effect of using a dullcoat.

So the idea is that one should use a gloss coat for its protective strength, followed by a satin or matte coat to adjust the level of shine for desired appearance.

 

Or, listen to Smokingrewckage there. He said basically the same thing in not as many words.

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I'm now confused is dullcote not a varnish? I thought it was. So in reality why your saying is they need a standard varnish followed by dullcote?

 

In terms of polymer coatings, a varnish is basically a paint base without any pigment, though it may have a matting agent or other modifiers to make it more protective. In modern usage, the word is almost interchangeable with "clearcoat" and "sealant".

 

In more traditional media, the term "varnish" refers to a class of resins including damar and mastic that are largely incompatible with lacquer and shellac. I'd have to dig out the technical papers on oil painting and wood finishes to really explain it all, as that's not really something I do enough to know about in detail.

 

But anyway, there are arguments that a gloss varnish is inherently stronger because , lacking a pigment, it creates a continuous polymer film once dried. The matting agent in a matte varnish may cause it to be more fragile, but its surface imperfections allow it to scatter reflected light, which is the desired effect of using a dullcoat.

So the idea is that one should use a gloss coat for its protective strength, followed by a satin or matte coat to adjust the level of shine for desired appearance.

 

Or, listen to Smokingrewckage there. He said basically the same thing in not as many words.

Thanks for the info. Looks like I will need to purchase some gloss sealer to go with the dullcote I have.

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