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Freehand Work


Darkrelease
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Lili's reply shames me into adding more. :blush:

 

I also sketch out complex patterns on paper before putting them on the model. On my Emperor's Champion model:

 

http://www.sodemons.com/gd23usbaltimore/1-...IMG_3967-01.htm

 

I traced out the scrolly pattern just a little larger than actual, on paper, as a guide. Then the first color over the dark brown was put in with a light layer, so that it was easy to correct if needed. On the shoulder pad, I drew out the design about an inch high first, then sketched it on a spare plastic shoulder pad with a Micron pen. That created a good guide for the painting.

 

On cloaks and banners, I've occasionally used fine strips of masking tape and/or masking fluid, to mark a center point, create an even border line, establish margins, etc. This goes on over the base color: a red cloak will be painted and highlighted, given a coat of sealer, then marked out for the pattern.

 

For me, on figural designs, it's easiest to paint in blocks of color in the right shape with the base or shadow color, rather than try to draw an outline with my brush.

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On cloaks and banners, I've occasionally used fine strips of masking tape and/or masking fluid, to mark a center point, create an even border line, establish margins, etc. This goes on over the base color: a red cloak will be painted and highlighted, given a coat of sealer, then marked out for the pattern.

I've never used masking tape before. Jen, do you use the masking tape for modelling that I can find at modelling shop? Like for airbrushing aircraft/car miniature model?

 

Oh yes, another trick that I found work, but a wee bit dangerous to take care of those unexpected/accident bumpy paint on your freehand. (just remember that this only work on a big block of freehand, not for pattern freehand - on a big flat open area, not folded area).

 

When I started freehand detailing, I also had that bumpy paint job, which I hate. So I took my wet sanding paper - the finest grit, torn a small piece and carefully and lightly sand that bumpy area to retrieve the surface level. Cleaned it up, dull coted it and back on painting that area again.

 

Crazy, I know. But when you're so close to deadline and desperate, you just gotta do it! ::P:

 

Lili

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I've never used masking tape before. Jen, do you use the masking tape for modelling that I can find at modelling shop? Like for airbrushing aircraft/car miniature model?

Last time I used it, I just cut fine strips of regular masking tape. Were I do to, say, lots of masked-out patterns on a vehicle, I think I'd go buy the modeller's kind.

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Masking tape, also called by the brand name scotch tape, was a failed invention that found a use.

 

When first invented, they wanted a tape that could be applied to surfaces and still be removable, without rewetting ( the old style gum tapes, etc ).

 

Now, it turned out the adhesive wasn't up to the task of sealing boxes, etc. It was too weak. One user made the comment along the lines of "This tape's adhesive is cheap! A scot must have made it", utilizing the stereotype of the miserly scotsman.

 

Well, the insult became the name, scotch tape. And the tape found an application, Fords' body painters used it to mask off parts of car bodies when painting. The scotch tape adhered just enough to hold the masking material on, but not so much that it would ruin the paint or finish when removed.

 

And thus masking tape was born

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Where can I find micropens? I have a figure here just screaming for a tattoo...

If you have a Michaels near you go an invade them. They have them down with the Scrapbooking supplies.

 

Otherwise call up your local art stores and ask if they carry them. Most do.

 

EDIT: Oh and the are called Micron pens, not micropens. ::D:

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I got something that seems about the same. It's called a Decocolor Opaque Paint Marker. The thinnest ones they had produce 1mm-thick lines, which seems perfect to me for simple designs on robes and heraldic designs, though for anything more complex then that I'd probably use a very fine brush.

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Mmm.... You dirty rats. I step away for a vacation and you get into all the good stuff. Fun thread. Glad I caught it before it disappeared. ::D:

 

To my mind, freehand really helps to add life and character to a model beyond the sculpt itself. It gives the painter a chance to breathe even more personality into fig. I've been having a lot of fun playing with freehand of late.

 

My Latest Piece is just chock full of it. Perhaps I even went overboard, I'll admit.

 

But, regardless of that, let me jot down a few pointers that I've either picked up on my own or adopted from others. I've been meaning to write up a bit of blurb about freehand when I get the time, and still intend to, but for now this will do.

 

1. THIN PAINT -- I can't stress this enough. Thin your paints, gang. Use extender, flow improver, and water to thin your paints at least 4:1 when doing freehand. I go even higher. Sometimes 10:1 if I'm working on light backgrounds.

 

2. Steady your hands as much as possible. This was discussed in one of Enchantra's threads. I think Here. Make sure your hands are braced and the mini is held still. The best way to do this is to lay the mini on your table. Really.

 

3. Relax. Hard to do, I know, but relax. You need to be relaxed before beginning and be breathing naturally, and you need to remain relaxed when you mess up. You will mess up. That's the sum of it. You will mess up. Be mentally prepared for this and don't sweat it. Painting minis is all about making everyone think you have a steady hand when, in fact, you shake like Bam...

 

4. OK. Here's one of my all time favorite secrets.... Spritz your mini with dull cote before starting your freehand. Once your base is ready, coat it (or would that be cote it) down. Why? Well, it'll make cleaning up mistakes much easier.... AND.... will allow you to "sculpt" your paint... That is to say, using your brush, you'll be able to edge your designs by peeling and pushing the paint around even after it has dried. For you see paint doesn't adhere well to Dull Cote. In fact, it barely adheres to it at all. This can be very frustrating, and, normally after I've spritzed to seal finished work, I'll reprime an area to achieve satisfactory adhesion with the next layers of paint. However, when freehanding, I use this lack of adhesion to my advantage to peel up mistakes, correct edges, and so forth. Give this a try. It's really a boon. Just be patient as your initial basecoat of your design will peel up with the slightest bit of pressure from your brush.

 

OK. That's enough for now. I'm tired and babbling and probably butchering my grammar, but for now, that'll do, pig. That'll do.

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