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What is the melting point of Bonesium?


MojoBob
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Just to save a whole lot of trial-and-error adjustment, what is the melting point of Bonesium?

 

The reason I ask is because I've found a small adjustable-temperature soldering iron to be a good way of smoothing out mould seams on soft plastic figures in the past, but the temperature needs to be fairly precise for ease of work. Too cool and it does nothing; too hot and you run a significant risk of melting great holes in your figure.

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I don't think this is a wise course of experimentation. Melting plastic with a soldering iron is never a good idea, you could wind up breathing in some real unhealthy vapors.

 

 

I agree. Melting holes in ones mini is one thing. Melting holes in ones brain is another.

I wear a respirator, because I am not stupid.

 

And good for you on being safety conscious, however not every hobbyist or newbie is, and its still not a practice I would suggest.

 

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I wear a respirator, because I am not stupid.

I'm sure the poster was trying to help. Not to insult you.

 

 

Sorry, no offence taken. This is one of those "no tone of voice on the internet" things — I was just being facetious. :)

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This stuff is not that hard to look up...

 

As I recall, they are cast at several thousand degrees C...

 

Uhh, No. :ph34r:

 

...the surface of the sun is "several thousand degrees" Celsius. (5500 to 6000 °C) The molds in the Bones Injection equipment are made from some steel alloy --- the molds and the machine they were mounted in would melt if subjected to several thousand degrees Celsius. <_<

 

(Note: "several" means, at minimum, more than two.)

__________

 

A few factoids, in degrees Celsius:

  • Tungsten melts at 3400.
  • Steel and Iron anywhere from 1125 to 1500 (depends on the composition and alloy).
  • Aluminum alloys (several exist) 460 to 670.
  • Water boils at 100.

If a Bones figure was heated in an aluminum pan, the figure will probably melt before the pan does. Boiling water will not melt a Bones figure (though forumites have reported it will soften one).

 

So narrowing this down a bit for MojoBob: it is likely somewhere between 101 and 459 Celsius.

____________

 

But? :huh: Why attack one with heat when it cuts so easily with scissors and other bladed implements?

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This stuff is not that hard to look up...

 

As I recall, they are cast at several thousand degrees C...

 

Uhh, No. :ph34r:

 

...the surface of the sun is "several thousand degrees" Celsius. (5500 to 6000 °C) The molds in the Bones Injection equipment are made from some steel alloy --- the molds and the machine they were mounted in would melt if subjected to several thousand degrees Celsius. <_<

 

(Note: "several" means, at minimum, more than two.)

__________

 

A few factoids, in degrees Celsius:

  • Tungsten melts at 3400.
  • Steel and Iron anywhere from 1125 to 1500 (depends on the composition and alloy).
  • Aluminum alloys (several exist) 460 to 670.
  • Water boils at 100.

If a Bones figure was heated in an aluminum pan, the figure will probably melt before the pan does. Boiling water will not melt a Bones figure (though forumites have reported it will soften one).

 

So narrowing this down a bit for MojoBob: it is likely somewhere between 101 and 459 Celsius.

____________

 

But? :huh: Why attack one with heat when it cuts so easily with scissors and other bladed implements?

Uh... yeah. I have no idea why I thought that number made any sense. I blame the American educational system and our crazy Fahrenheit scales. I was probably thinking a few hundred? Thanks for the correction.

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To the original question - 160 C.

 

The Auld Grump

 

I've seen numbers from 80C to 212C for the melting point of PVC. We do know that 80C is not correct, since boiling water softens Bones but does not cause it to flow. The melting point varies based on amount of plasticizers and the temperature at which polymerization took place.) The Grump might have information specific to the Bones formulation but there are multiple formulations, so I suspect that 160C is not a canonical answer.

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