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01514: ReaperCon 2011 Adventure Sophie


Ellyria
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My first tin. Thanks for all the help, everyone! I learned a whole lot in the process, including I need smaller brushes. The mask is because I mutilated her face trying to touch up the details, so I made her outfit comic book colored. Sorry for the photo quality. This was the best lighting I could get. Oh, and she kept falling over, so I glued her to a rock.

 

post-12665-0-66226400-1379786951.jpg

 

post-12665-0-23735900-1379786936.jpg

 

post-12665-0-77999700-1379786963.jpg

 

post-12665-0-58987600-1379786977.jpg

Edited by Ellyria
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All your colors seem to be in the right place and you've positioned her quite dynamically on the base; I'd call this a win! The photos don't give us much to go on, but from what I can see I like what you've done, and I love the color palette of her hair and tanktop. Good stuff!

 

As for brushes...don't worry about "smaller;" worry about "better." You'll find that many of the more experienced painters around here work with size 1's almost exclusively. I personally use a 1 for almost everything, although I have a 0 and a 000 that mostly get used for eyes and little else. You just need a good brush made of natural weasel-butt-fur that will keep a good point (Windsor&Newton Series 7 and DaVinci Maestro are the two brands/lines you'll hear most often). They'll be expensive, but if you get a good brush and take care of it it'll last years. Most synthetics wont last more than a few minis, and cheap natural brushes won't often do much better.

 

Thanks for sharing. Now, paint more and let us see!

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for your photography. Do yourself a couple of small favours. First, try not to take pictures with a light source, in this case the windows, behind the subject, and second, try and shoot the subject with a background of a neutral color. These will allow the colours on the figure to show better, and with a backing, you may have better luck with focus issues.

 

That said, I think she looks like a win. One more friendly hint, never strip her of her paint,and always keep her. Having your first metal mini will always giveyou something to look back on and see how faryour skills have come. One of the best forms of encouragement is to see you have made progress.

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The light from the windows isn't bad, although as Shadowraven says you don't want it behind your figures, but coming from in front of them.

 

Your focus is off, I think you're too close to the figure, note that the ADT sticker in image 1 is very sharp. So you may want to back off some.

 

You can gently bend Sophie into a more upright position. The metal makes scary creaking sounds, but nothing bad is happening. Take a look at the positioning in this image http://www.fantization.com/pre-ordermay2011-reaperconsophie2011x1fig-limitededition.aspx I think if you twist up and to the left you will get her to where she won't fall over.

 

And dang, now I want to paint her too!

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I'm jumping on the 'want to paint that mini bandwagon.' And I also second getting better or smaller brushes. I usually use 2-3 different brush sizes (one for base coats, one for details and one for dry brushing and/or washes) but making sure they are quality is the important part. My brushes have served me well, but have been abused to hell and back and I need new ones.

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From what I can see, looks like a good first mini - way better than my early efforts.

 

Some good photography tips above. If possible, try to pick an overcast day to take your photos, or wait until the sun nips behind some clouds. If this isn't possible, taping a sheet of tracing paper to the window can help diffuse the sunlight, but you need a fairly large sheet. I would recommend using the edge of the window ledge, and taping a suitable background so that it curves nicely behind your miniature, and the light is coming from the side. Finally your shots are out of focus. Move the camera further from the miniatures, and crop the edges. Even if you end up with smaller pictures to post, if they are in focus we'll be able to see much better.

 

Regarding brushes, as others have said, it's the quality that matters more than the size. A good brush can keep a very fine point at the tip, so you can paint quite a lot of datail with a relatively large brush. I do most of my painting with a size 2, and I sometimes go up to a size 4 for bigger things (I suspect this will get a lot of use for some of the bigger bones). I do have smaller, and the size 0 comes out quite a lot for details, and some really small ones for things like eyes, but since I started using good brushes I've used the tiny ones less and less.

 

James

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I can't tell if this is better or not...

 

post-12665-0-73198800-1379871719.jpg

 

All of these are zoomed way out and cropped down from 2Kx3K pixels.

 

Tilda for detail comparison if I have the light source directly on:

 

post-12665-0-91527300-1379871813.jpg

 

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If there's not way too much, my phone doesn't pick it up at all.

 

Maybe for my birthday or Christmas I'll ask for a real camera with underwater and macro modes. :)

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