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Oh Lactose how I hate you!


Cassu
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As I've gotten older (I'm only 27 now) I've found that I can no longer eat things I could growing up. Onions, capsicum and some other vegetables tend to make me feel very ill if they're under-cooked. I steer-clear of any salads that have raw green shallots because even one piece upsets my stomach.

I was happy enough to avoid these things or at least be careful with how I prepare them because it wasn't too hard to. But now it seems I have to add another entire food group to list of things that make me feel ill; dairy products and high lactose products.
I suspected awhile ago that dairy may be causing me some trouble, so I went without for a bit and then had some to see how I faired. ...I didn't fair well. :down: Going to go to the Doctor to confirm my suspicion that I've become lactose intolerant and get some advice on how to manage.

I'm going to try and switch to as many lactose-free products as I can, but it seems intimidating. I've never realized how many products have lactose, or how many times a day I cook things with cream, cheese or milk.

Does anyone else have any allergies or food intolerances? How did you go about cutting them out of your diet, or finding places to cater to your dietary needs?

 

I swear if I were a Wildebeest I would have been picked-off many years ago.

 

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Oh man, I'm pretty sure I'm developing lactose intolerance. It runs in the family, but I thought I'd avoided it until recently; I've been having some stomach troubles that I think can be traced back to ice cream. Fooey.

Oh that's a shame! Thankfully Sorbet exists, I think I'll be stocking our freeze with that from now-on.

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I am somewhat lactose intolerant. Sour Cream is right out, but I can eat most hard cheeses, especially if they are melted, and milk on my cereal doesn't become too much of a problem if I don't eat it every day. My biggest though, is peppers. One or two bites is okay, but more than that, and I shall be remaining right close to the W.C. for the next 12-24 hours, and no one wants to be in an enclosed space with me. Oddly, dried chillies aren't near so bad.

 

for me, it means asking if what I order contains peppers, and avoiding them where I can. Fortunately my friends are all too aware, and alternatives are sought. That one of my friends is deathly allergic to onions helps, we all know that there are certain foods that we just avoid.

 

With lactose problems,you can at least get pills that seem to help, and cooking also tends to help as it breaks down the lactose,making it easier to digest.

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My sister-in-law recently developed a lactose intolerance but she takes pill for it as she's not going to give up her desserts. Lactose intolerance in adults is more common then not as most parts of the world adults didn't drink milk and cheese was something that was a more limited diet. I happen to be lucky enough to have my ancestors all from the parts of Europe were that was never the case.

 

I don't have any food allergies myself but I have a friend who's allergic to just about every type of food out there. Her white blood cells freak out if she eats almost anything but she occasionally decides it's worth the paint.

Edited by MonkeySloth
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I developed lactose intolerance at some point. Mine is rather mild, I think, I can have sour cream on fajitas but a bowl of ice cream or pasta with cream sauce is right out without a pill. Or rather, was. I've found that yogurt not only is just fine for me, but if I have it regularly I can consume other dairy products with almost no issues! I think the bacteria they use to make it into yogurt eat most of the lactose, and probably take up short term residence in the belly and keep working for you until they get shoved out by your existing stomach friends. Yeah, not super pleasant to think about.

 

Try the pills, try a small bowl of frozen yogurt. Push your limits a little at a time! It's not fun to be on a restricted diet.

 

Also, pop-rocks have lactose in.

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Yogurt is still quite high in lactose. Hard cheeses have very little, soft cheeses have quite a lot of lactose.

You can get both pills and drops which help digest the lactose. The pills you consume before the food. The drops work by being added to the food to predigest the lactose (ie making it low/no lactose).

It might be worth investigating if you have reactions to gluten as well, as often gluten allergies (celiac) can damage the lining of the small intestine, making reactions to lactose more likely.

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I actually went the opposite. During my teen years I had a great big list of things I couldn't eat, and now none of them apply. I couldn't have milk products, now I could probably suck it straight out of the cow.

 

Heck, I could probably eat a bowl of termites and rock salt and it wouldn't bother me.

 

It's all that ramen I ate. Gave me a protective inner layer of undigested MSG.

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@Cassu I'm lactose intolerant. I have to be careful about what I eat, and in what quantities. One thing you learn fairly quick is that when cooking you can substitute water for milk in almost anything that requires it, since milk is mostly water anyway. Don't get me wrong, sometimes I say screw it, and have a big bowl of cornflakes with some 2%. Sometimes I get away with it, sometimes not.

Depending on how bad your intolerance is you can also sometimes substitute yogurt for some other dairy uses. Oh, and if you like ice cream then frozen custard is the way to go. Onions also cause me some problems. I love me some onions, especially cooked. Sadly they no longer love me.

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I got lactose intolerant as a teen, seem to have outgrown most of it now in mid-life. At the time there was no alternative but to go cold turkey, so I've learned to live without dairy, for the most part. It wasn't hard, but today *everything* comes with cheese so I constantly have to ask even on food that shouldn't have it. Most restaurants can manage if you ask for a salad or sandwich with no cheese, or sour cream on the side, etc. You get a few that forget or don't read the ticket.

 

Now there's lactose milk, which I don't drink, but I do use it for tea and cooking. There's lactose cheese and other products but I think they're nasty. I tried the tablets for a while, but it got to be a PITA to keep them on hand. Easier to just not put cheese on the food. Along the way we learned what food tastes like. Cheese covers up the flavor of food, it's used in a lot of restaurants and processed food to disguise poor quality product. Don't believe me, try ordering a pizza without cheese and see what you get.

 

As Loim says, you can sub water for milk in most recipes. Also some people can tolerate yogurt and hard aged cheeses like parmesan. You'll have to experiment to find your personal comfort level. If you cook, look for recipes that don't rely on cheese to carry the flavor.

 

The advantage to you is you're going to remove a LOT of unneeded calories from your diet this way. While your friends are working on their muffin tops you're consuming 1000 calories a day less than them.

 

My husband has a reaction to peppers. You think finding food without lactose is hard, try finding something without some kind of chili derivative as well. And at restaurants they put it on everything.

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Oh man, I'm pretty sure I'm developing lactose intolerance. It runs in the family, but I thought I'd avoided it until recently; I've been having some stomach troubles that I think can be traced back to ice cream. Fooey.

Oh that's a shame! Thankfully Sorbet exists, I think I'll be stocking our freeze with that from now-on.

 

Yeah, but my dining hall has unlimited ice cream, and no sorbet. Tragic, really.

 

I am somewhat lactose intolerant. Sour Cream is right out, but I can eat most hard cheeses, especially if they are melted, and milk on my cereal doesn't become too much of a problem if I don't eat it every day. My biggest though, is peppers. One or two bites is okay, but more than that, and I shall be remaining right close to the W.C. for the next 12-24 hours, and no one wants to be in an enclosed space with me. Oddly, dried chillies aren't near so bad.

 

for me, it means asking if what I order contains peppers, and avoiding them where I can. Fortunately my friends are all too aware, and alternatives are sought. That one of my friends is deathly allergic to onions helps, we all know that there are certain foods that we just avoid.

 

With lactose problems,you can at least get pills that seem to help, and cooking also tends to help as it breaks down the lactose,making it easier to digest.

Is the chilli problem related to the lactose thing, or a separate issue entirely?

 

Anyway, I am thinking about looking into Lactaid or similar, but I wanted to go a bit without ice cream to see if I can actually trace my symptoms to that. I didn't think about the scrambled eggs; not sure I can cut those out of my diet.

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I also have a mild lactose intolerance, getting slowly worse. LactAid pills have always worked for me, so I still eat ice cream. Cheese, so far, don't bother me much, thank goodness.

 

It's actually wine I have to be careful about. Italian wines have always been my favorites, and I'm ok with those, but I always seem like a horrid wine snob because California wines (and some of the Northwestern American wines) do awful awful things to me. From my understanding, the soil there has a particularly high sulfite content...not that I really know what that means, but it lets me offer an explanation.

Edited by Sanael
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I'm mildly allergic to onions. All it really does if I eat them is I have an itchy throat and a snuffy nose for a while. Cutting them, on the other hand, is pure pain. My eyes burn. I mean, burn. And, I can't tear up, so it just gets worse and worse. I found this out the fun way when I was trying to cut some for dinner and had to flee the kitchen for the bathroom where I spend the next 20-30 minutes trying to wash out my eyes while my ex freaked out. I also found out that being in the same room as cooking onions causes the same thing to happen, which meant long walks while dinner was being cooked a few times.

 

Oddly enough, I'm totally fine with cooked onions and can eat them by the truckload with only minor problems. Dried onions can be fine one day, then torture the next. Red/purple/etc onions are usually worse.

 

The worst part is I'm addicted to salsa, as well as most Mexican foods. And burgers without onions just aren't worth eating. I also found a great recipe for Chili Verde which I can not longer make. This makes me sad on many levels.

 

Edit: this is also why I refuse to be Mace/OC Spray trained at work. I have no idea how closely related the stuff in onions is related to it, and I'm not taking any chances. I'd rather be Tasered, thank you.

Edited by CaptainPete
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Hrmmm, I like this 'pill' idea. I cook too many desserts and enjoy scrambled eggs too much to go cold-turkey or find places that make lactose-free scrambled eggs,

 

Cassu: Sent you a PM.

 

@Everybody: you never know what products contain milk solids. Look for "whey" in ingredients lists (that might be the deal with that chili someone posted about). Whey is chock full of Lactose. Scrambling eggs without adding milk works just fine, I do it all the time. Cheeses vary in Lactose content. The authentic cheese-making process involves bacteria acting on the cream and milk solids and by "acting" I mean consuming the Lactose. The more of it they get rid of the less that particular cheese will bother you. Swiss cheese is usually very low in Lactose.

 

That so-called "American Cheese" is neither American (invented in Switzerland, 1911) nor Cheese (it ain't cheese if bacteria were not involved) but it is usually loaded with Lactose.

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