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Here's my first wizard paint job. Still need to figure out what to do for a base, as with all my minis so far. Critiques and words of advice are welcome. I'm still using craft paints, but I got some flow improver and extender which really help. The mini is the Bones 89013: Ezren, Iconic Wizard.

 

wiz01_Front.jpg

 

wiz01_Rear.jpg

 

... and here's a gif:

 

wiz01_turntable.gif

Edited by reversednormals
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I love seeing all of the different interpretations of this sculpt - he's a great all-purpose adventuring wizard. You've got a nice, clean paintjob going here, he'd be most welcome on a lot of gaming tables I know.

 

If I were to offer advice on this particular piece, it might be along the lines of color selection. It looks like his tabard, boots, leather straps/belts, and wooden bits (staff, crossbow) are all the same brown. Especially where these same-colored items are close together on the model, a little distinction between the individual items is lost, and your wood and leather look like they might be the same material. Shading helps, absolutely, but varying up which colors are adjacent could help some of the finer details pop a little more.

 

One way to work on this idea without turning his outfit into a multicolored riot is to possibly vary up the tones of brown you use. Darker browns vs. lighter browns, green-toned browns vs. red- or yellow-toned browns, and so on. Models like this are a good way to experiment with how differently toned "neutral" colors interact with each other.

 

There are folks on the boards who are a lot more well-versed in color theory than I who might chime in on this topic, but a little trial-and-error will help you find combinations that you like, or which work particularly well for a given character model.

 

Looking forward to seeing your next piece!

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I love seeing all of the different interpretations of this sculpt - he's a great all-purpose adventuring wizard. You've got a nice, clean paintjob going here, he'd be most welcome on a lot of gaming tables I know.

 

If I were to offer advice on this particular piece, it might be along the lines of color selection. It looks like his tabard, boots, leather straps/belts, and wooden bits (staff, crossbow) are all the same brown. Especially where these same-colored items are close together on the model, a little distinction between the individual items is lost, and your wood and leather look like they might be the same material. Shading helps, absolutely, but varying up which colors are adjacent could help some of the finer details pop a little more.

 

One way to work on this idea without turning his outfit into a multicolored riot is to possibly vary up the tones of brown you use. Darker browns vs. lighter browns, green-toned browns vs. red- or yellow-toned browns, and so on. Models like this are a good way to experiment with how differently toned "neutral" colors interact with each other.

 

There are folks on the boards who are a lot more well-versed in color theory than I who might chime in on this topic, but a little trial-and-error will help you find combinations that you like, or which work particularly well for a given character model.

 

Looking forward to seeing your next piece!

 

Thank you, this is exactly what I was stressing about as I was finishing him up!

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I love seeing all of the different interpretations of this sculpt - he's a great all-purpose adventuring wizard. You've got a nice, clean paintjob going here, he'd be most welcome on a lot of gaming tables I know.

 

If I were to offer advice on this particular piece, it might be along the lines of color selection. It looks like his tabard, boots, leather straps/belts, and wooden bits (staff, crossbow) are all the same brown. Especially where these same-colored items are close together on the model, a little distinction between the individual items is lost, and your wood and leather look like they might be the same material. Shading helps, absolutely, but varying up which colors are adjacent could help some of the finer details pop a little more.

 

One way to work on this idea without turning his outfit into a multicolored riot is to possibly vary up the tones of brown you use. Darker browns vs. lighter browns, green-toned browns vs. red- or yellow-toned browns, and so on. Models like this are a good way to experiment with how differently toned "neutral" colors interact with each other.

 

There are folks on the boards who are a lot more well-versed in color theory than I who might chime in on this topic, but a little trial-and-error will help you find combinations that you like, or which work particularly well for a given character model.

 

Looking forward to seeing your next piece!

 

Thank you, this is exactly what I was stressing about as I was finishing him up!

 

Spot on. Great constructive feedback. It's really good.

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Nissiana is right, but I would also stress this: contrast. What you need is MORE contrast in there. And contrast can help with color separation.

 

How, you say? Simple. Different hues for shadows and highlights.

 

Take your browns. Shading the tabard with a near-black blue and highlighting with a cold brown-green, you can then shadow the pouches with a warm red-brown and highlight those pouches with a yellow-brown, and you get very distinct browns without varying the base color. Experimentation is what you need to do there.

 

And this will also help with definition of shapes. Because the MORE you shade, the more it is like blacklining. Shadows and lights are what create the "blacklining" in real life, and what define the shapes. Proper highlighting of the pouches, and the boots, and the staff can really bring the "in your face 3D" you see in a lot of pro painting.

 

You just need to let your fear behind and do one more highlight, one more deep shade :)

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