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Primed my Cthulhu - help?

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My wife got me a Bones Cthulhu for my birthday and I excitedly, put him together, removed the flash and primed him.

 

Now he's a sticky mess. I came to the boards and read some of the recommendations to my chagrin.

 

Is there anything I can do to restore him to a non-sticky state? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

I would also suggest putting a large notice about how priming isn't necessary for the Bones line on your packaging.

 

Thanks,

Dave Margowsky

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What kind of primer did you use? What brand? How long ago did you prime?

 

Simple Green will give you the opportunity for a "do-over" worse case scenario.

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Buy a bottle of Simple Green and let him soak for a bit. It'll dissolve the primer right off, and you can basecoat him properly with unthinned paint.

 

It seems that something in aerosols reacts poorly with Bones, since people have been having very mixed results with both spray primers and sealers. Brush-on seems to be the way to go if you really must primer or seal your Bones minis.

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Should have came here first. There is a lot of help in boards for stipping and priming bones

 

I disagree. I'd have thought that visiting the forums before painting would not required for something designed to be an entry level material, like Bones.

 

One of the selling points certainly was the lack of a requirement to prime: I can't recall at the moment if the Cthulhu packaging states that explicitly, but it's probably worth putting on there if it's not already.

 

Dave, stripping it back with Simple Green is probably the best way to start. Soak it overnight, scrub with a toothbrush (or stick it in an ultrasonic cleaner, if you have one), and then either re-prime with one of the known-good primers or just slap a base coat on.

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Should have came here first. There is a lot of help in boards for stipping and priming bones

 

I disagree. I'd have thought that visiting the forums before painting would not required for something designed to be an entry level material, like Bones.

 

One of the selling points certainly was the lack of a requirement to prime: I can't recall at the moment if the Cthulhu packaging states that explicitly, but it's probably worth putting on there if it's not already.

 

Dave, stripping it back with Simple Green is probably the best way to start. Soak it overnight, scrub with a toothbrush (or stick it in an ultrasonic cleaner, if you have one), and then either re-prime with one of the known-good primers or just slap a base coat on.

I would disagree with your disagreement. Back in the day when I started you had to be taught by someone else how to prep a mini or ifyou bought a box directions camee with it. Since this is not 1989 I would think however if anyone is just entering the hobby they would go online for a few pointers. With that said how does goof off extreme react to bones Edited by Grimreaper71
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The Cthulhu box has the same blub as the blister pack: "Ready to paint or play right away". Neither mention primer at all, and adding that primer is not needed may provide more clarity.

 

Since we do not know by which means a new customer finds Bones, asking them to go online first is not a fair request. A change of wording may suffice.

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The boxes also don't mention giving them a bath.

 

That being said, give the Elder One a bath. Though soaking in Simple green should suffice... I hate the smell of that stuff, licorice, yuck!

 

Anyway, some have found that certain spray primers don't work well on Bones. A search of the Painting tips forum should yield relevent posts. Me, I'm a brush on paint girl, so I can't advise you.

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Manhammer, the Bones: The First Coat is the Difference has some good information on painting including priming for those who want to do so. There is a list of primers along with results about 1/3 of the way down the first post in the thread. It's a good read on painting Bones, so I recommend reading at least the first post.

 

The Army Painter primers and Krylon Dual Paint + Primer are listed as not having bad results on Bones. I have only tried the Army Painter sprays on Bones (White and Necrotic Flesh) and both have worked without any tackiness. If you have any Bones which have had the integral bases cut off or any Bones' sprues, I would test primers on scrap pieces before spraying an entire model. I would even test the primers which are listed as OK just to be sure since Bones are rather finicky with spray primers.

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Maybe they could add a small paper note in the boxes for these big guys mentioning the need to wash and to avoid most spray primers, and then check out the FAQ. Would save having to print new boxes for them. It would be a real shame for another big monster or god forbid a Kaladrax to get tacked up.

 

And I really, really hope this Cthulhu turns out okay. I can't tell you how upsetting I found this post.

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The boxes also don't mention giving them a bath.

 

That being said, give the Elder One a bath. Though soaking in Simple green should suffice... I hate the smell of that stuff, licorice, yuck!

 

Anyway, some have found that certain spray primers don't work well on Bones. A search of the Painting tips forum should yield relevent posts. Me, I'm a brush on paint girl, so I can't advise you.

I really don't get that from Simple Green. It just doesn't smell like licorice to me.

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I disagree with the disagreement to disagree with... :P

 

Anyway, from miniatures to taxes to KS projects, I find the more you prepare -- and this includes research - before committing, the better.

 

I've always thought that, with hobby kits, you're lucky if you get assembly instructions. Read those threads on BoardGameGeek about Super Dungeon Explore...

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I've finally gotten around to painting one of the dragons that I received in my Bones order. I cleaned the mold lines, assembled it...and then like I do with my old lead items...primed it.

 

HUGE mistake. Used spray primer and the miniature is sticky.

 

I've soaked it in simple green...but still a layer of primer. Any suggestions on something that'll remove the primer and not melt the plastic? I've read oven cleaner (not really sure I want to use this) Pine Sol (used it in the past..miniatures smelled like it until they were painted) and brake fluid.

 

What's safe to use that will remove spray primer but not destroy the figure? I've learned my lesson and won't be priming any of my other bones.

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Oh no, we just had one of these threads about someone who primed a Cthulhu.

 

Simple Green seems to be the consensus, so I don't know what to tell you. I would try soaking it even longer this time, and then scrub it all over with an old toothbrush while it's still covered in it.

 

Also, I absolutely can not recommend Dullcoat or any other spray sealer. It's the aerosolizers that react to the Bones material, so anything that comes out of a spray can has a chance of turning sticky and gross. Shaking really well in exactly the "ideal" conditions described on the can, in the lowest humidity possible, will probably reduce the odds of something going wrong to a negligible level, but I personally wouldn't risk it. Just use brush-on sealer. The Reaper stuff is matte.

Edited by Slendertroll

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