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Practicing differant techniqus


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So on one of my minitures I would like to attempt one technique but while I have seem some how to videos on it I dont know if I will be able to pull it off to the point I would want to do it on my mini wich is part of a contest entery. So I was wondering how do you practice a technique when the only mini that you can or want to use it on is something that you dont want to screw up wether it is for a contest or just a timeline on a pc that you need to put on the table.

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You need to fail to learn and get better. We don't start being the best painters around. And yet, it is very difficult to completely screw up your paint job.

 

If, after all, you feel you want to start over, you can always strip the paint off and start again. And again :)

 

But you will never know if you can pull it off, if you don't try and fail and learn ;)

 

Go for it, share the WIP and ask for tips. This community is great for that.

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My secret is I just do it! As long as you study up on it and have a plan in place when you start, it'll turn out somewhere in the vicinity of what you were trying to do (mine never looks the way I envisioned, but usually turns out ok anyway).

 

+1 for everything Willen just said.

 

Bones are really amazing for practicing many techniques, too.

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There's a product (the name escapes me right now - something green?) that is reportedly very good for stripping paint off minis. You could do the trial paint, make your mistakes, and when you're done if you're unhappy, just strip the paint and redo it.

 

Or you could buy yourself a practice mini or two - stuff you can use the technique on but are okay with screwing up.

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There's a product (the name escapes me right now - something green?) that is reportedly very good for stripping paint off minis. You could do the trial paint, make your mistakes, and when you're done if you're unhappy, just strip the paint and redo it.

 

Or you could buy yourself a practice mini or two - stuff you can use the technique on but are okay with screwing up.

 

It's called Simple Green I believe, which some people say you leave a mini in for 24 hours and it will strip all the paint off real easily. I haven't tried that myself yet, but I did buy some of the cleaner in advance in case I'm terribly unhappy with a figure I painted up.

 

 

I suggest the LTPK's for practicing on personally. I like that you get 10 paints, 2 figures, instructions, and brushes all for under $30.

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Simple Green is very effective at removing paint. I don't often strip minis, but I do use SG for cleaning minis prior to painting, cleaning dried paint off ceramic palettes, and cleaning sinks, showers, toilets, etc.

 

Not that I often have lots of paint on the toilet.

 

In general, it's a good cleaner to have for our hobby.

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Sheer stockings are the bane of my existence, it's very tricky and takes loads of patience.

 

I don't think you want to strip a mini this close to the contest deadline so this is what I would do if I were you. I'd give it one try and if it failed, I scrap the technique for this figure. As you'll be working with extremely thin layers, if you mess up, you can easily fix it by painting plain stockings.

 

I do hope you succeed though as I'd love to see it!

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Agreed with the suggestions above: If you really want to use a technique, and time is short--try it. In a worst-case scenario, you can paint over it and you've still learned something in the process. In best-case scenario, you get a handle on it and it does pretty well the first time out. The more research you do ahead of time, the more likely you'll land closer to best-case than worst-case, most of the time.

 

I know a few painters have sacrificed minis on the altar of practice, destined to live near the paint table to be guinea pigs for freehand, lighting, sheer, etc. but never to be finished. You can always try a sample on another mini on "standby" if you're really worried about the contest entry, and then strip that one for future use later if you don't want "Sir Test" to be loitering around your workbench.

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