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He is shaping up nicely. Whatever you did to reduce some of the darkness from the washes worked really well.

 

Brush care:

 

When you are done for the painting session, put a drop or 2 of water into this, swirl it around until you get a little bit of foam, rub it across your hand, and then repeat the process until the soap is WHITE, and then rinse.

.

 

Then, put a SMALL drop of this onto your hand, glide your brush through it, and re-swirl the point. Leave it on your brush - it acts as a conditioner, and there is no harm in leaving it there.

 

I am suggesting this because I know how much those brushes are, but using that technique will keep them as fresh as possible for as long as possible, and for me, the 12ish bucks you will spend on the soaps MORE than make up for the cost of replacing a damaged brush. The other thing is, a little of this stuff will go a REALLY long way - you aren't using huge brushes so you aren't using huge amounts of soap and conditioner to clean and preserve them.

 

I think you will find that most people on these boards use all types of brushes, real hair vs synthetics, store brand vs W/N S7 & DM, and they all have their place, but I don't know that I would suggest trying to "save" your best brushes. A great quality brush, as long as you take care of it, will outlast the others, and you can feel the difference as you paint. They just make life a little easier.

 

Happy Painting!

Edited by galladril
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Galladril;

I put a 50 percent peacock Green and 50 percent water coat on the cloak and cowl,

making sure to leave the brown in the folds. There are maybe six coats of peacock green on there.

I then made up another mixture of grass green (as a highlight) and reduced it with 50 percent water.

Just applying coat after coat...leaving the shadows where I wanted them, and painting slowly with long wide

strokes overlapping them as I went along around the figure.

Every color on there is a minimum of three coats..

Building up the depth of color.

Hope that helps...its slow, but gosh that combo of blue and Green curls my toes..LOL

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You are going to notice that when you look at a miniature through a picture, vs on your stand.

 

I somehow managed to take a huge gouge out of a knuckle on a miniature to the point where you could see the metal underneath.

 

I didn't even see it until I looked at the picture.

 

EVERY imperfection you have made will be 10,000,000x more obvious after you snap a photo of it. Just seems to be the way of things.

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Galladrill;

I noticed.. I was suspecting my miniatures were really in bad shape.

Thank you for your input, and support.

I am going to attach the last photo I took.

Image Archer038

it was lost in the above edit.where all the photos went out of order.

Thanks again.

post-12655-0-65794000-1383704998_thumb.jpg

Edited by Jasonator
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Jasonator, I actually use my camera to help me see where I need to do touch-ups, so many things show up under the camera that don't show up to my eyes.

 

I have been frequently looking at your avatar image, I'm sure I've seen it somewhere, but I can't remember where. I'm going to guess based on your other post from today that my initial guess was right and it's Danish (or possibly Norwegian, my Danish isn't that great.) Your ranger is looking nice!

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Brush care:

 

When you are done for the painting session, put a drop or 2 of water into this, swirl it around until you get a little bit of foam, rub it across your hand, and then repeat the process until the soap is WHITE, and then rinse.

.

 

The brush cleaner and conditioners are nice, if you have them, but my mother, who is a painter, swears by a simple bar of yellow laundry soap. She uses it to clean out the paint and then puts a bit more on, creates the point and lets it dry.

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Reply to AnneO'Leary;

 

Here is the back of the cloak and its shadowing.

(Two Photos)

I also dry brushed the fletching on the arrows.

I think I am done with this Miniature (until I learn how to make the incredible bases some folks do).

Always something to learn around here.

Let me know what you think.

I'm learning also.

 

post-12655-0-19793200-1383763673_thumb.jpg

post-12655-0-60769000-1383768177_thumb.jpg

Edited by Jasonator
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Jasonator, I actually use my camera to help me see where I need to do touch-ups, so many things show up under the camera that don't show up to my eyes.

 

I have been frequently looking at your avatar image, I'm sure I've seen it somewhere, but I can't remember where. I'm going to guess based on your other post from today that my initial guess was right and it's Danish (or possibly Norwegian, my Danish isn't that great.) Your ranger is looking nice!

Thanks for your visit.

You remember my avatar since you went to my Jasonator's Mini's posting when I first joined. Yes, I speak Norwegian, and spell it terribly. I'm looking forward to a riese til Norge i Mai. Hopefully I will return home fluent in Norwegian. Everyone wants to practise their English, I have to convince them this time I need to practice MY Norske!

Hope that the photo's show you my way of incorporating the shadows in the cloak you asked about.

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A final note on the photos, and the Mini:

I number my miniature photos as "Name001.JPG - Name00X.JPG

If you want to follow my steps, download the photos in a folder and just sort them in numerical order.

There are some very subtle modifications in some of them.

Since I am using water downed colors, the transitions from brown wash to peacock Green, and then to the Grass Green highlight is a slow process,

There is also the modifications of the Shadow on the cloak and robes.

This isn't speed painting by any stretch of the imagaination.

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Well, here is the Elf dismounted from his shaving cream cap.

I have had a blast going through the phases of my painting technique.

The trip through the mud swamp was a challange to me.

That phase makes me RETHINK what I was trying to do,and then pushes

me to create a more vibrant painted figure.

I can honestly say,this was a fun project, just because of the small size,

and all the detail.

Hope you enjoyed the ride!

Jasonator

post-12655-0-62375000-1383942772_thumb.jpg

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