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Buglips's Guide to Drybrushing


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I find that using white paper towels for my drying surface help a lot. I lightly dip the brush in paint, and then brush back and forth until the part I'm brushing on is essentially dry. then I move to a clean spot and wipe until nothing is coming off. Then I start flicking the model's raised surfaces. When I reload, I will do it from that original heavier dry spot by rubbing the brush on it and brush on a clean spot again. I can usually do this 3 or 4 times before I have to go back to the wet paint.

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I find that using white paper towels for my drying surface help a lot. I lightly dip the brush in paint, and then brush back and forth until the part I'm brushing on is essentially dry. then I move to a clean spot and wipe until nothing is coming off. Then I start flicking the model's raised surfaces. When I reload, I will do it from that original heavier dry spot by rubbing the brush on it and brush on a clean spot again. I can usually do this 3 or 4 times before I have to go back to the wet paint.

 

Such a good idea! The other reason I wasn't warm to the idea of drybrushing is 'cause I didn't want to waste paint.

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I find that using white paper towels for my drying surface help a lot. I lightly dip the brush in paint, and then brush back and forth until the part I'm brushing on is essentially dry. then I move to a clean spot and wipe until nothing is coming off. Then I start flicking the model's raised surfaces. When I reload, I will do it from that original heavier dry spot by rubbing the brush on it and brush on a clean spot again. I can usually do this 3 or 4 times before I have to go back to the wet paint.

 

I've read that coffee filters are a good way to do this as well, they don't have the fibers that paper towels do.

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I've read that coffee filters are a good way to do this as well, they don't have the fibers that paper towels do.

That makes a lot of sense. I am very careful about what paper towels I buy because of the fibers. I have some plushy very absorbent ones with fibers that I ues for cleanup, and then I get a very cheap barely absorbent brand for drybrushing. I actually have a lot of luck with Scott Brand paper towels like you find in restroom paper towel dispensers.

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This is so cool, thank you buglips! I've played around with different ways of drybrushing to this point, but I still feel like I don't quite have a handle on it, so your tutorial is much appreciated! :)

 

Also, unless you have a particularly idiosyncratic way of holding your brush/painting, it looks like you're left-handed! That makes you about 50 times cooler in my book. ^_^

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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I've been dry-brushing since I saw a video on it online Sabith. It's nothing to be scared of, a good way to check and see if your brush has too much paint on it is to run it over the back of your hand and see how much paint comes off it after you've tried to get it down to the right amount on your brush. This will show you how much paint you'll be releasing on your figure, you'll see it come out very lightly on your skin or too heavy and can adjust accordingly.

just don't let Pingo find out, or you might get a stern talking to about what is in the paints that should not go into your body

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I've been dry-brushing since I saw a video on it online Sabith. It's nothing to be scared of, a good way to check and see if your brush has too much paint on it is to run it over the back of your hand and see how much paint comes off it after you've tried to get it down to the right amount on your brush. This will show you how much paint you'll be releasing on your figure, you'll see it come out very lightly on your skin or too heavy and can adjust accordingly.

just don't let Pingo find out, or you might get a stern talking to about what is in the paints that should not go into your body

 

 

I'm not a Goblin, I don't eat paints :blink:

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"Nontoxic" apparently actually means "nontoxic as long as you are using them the normal way." That is, they don't... release noxious fumes? Consuming them in any manner might still be a bad plan.

 

None of which stops me from using my fingertips to test wash consistency, of course.

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