Jump to content

Another Newb Painting Question


Gargs
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 31
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Pro tip: If your paint is too thick, add more water. If your paint is too thin, add more paint. ^_^

 

Of course, that can end up like the time my wife's aunt made gravy. After adding more water, then more flour, then more broth, ad absurdum, she had about 4 quarts of gravy (and I'm told it was kind of horrible). So don't do that. :;):

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to be a diehard user of just tap water to thin my paints. However, as I have learned more and more about painting, and especially as I started doing eyes, I've discovered that thinning with water is a half measure. A great man once said, "No more half measures."

 

I find I get much better control of where my paint goes when I use Liquitex Flow Improver dilluted 1:20 in distilled water.

It has emboldened me to paint finer details, actually practice on eyes, and it makes my basecoats flow on beautifully. It also prevents my paint from drying quite so fast on the palette. I am a convert.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I do WIP threads I try to just use "parts". I'm working with pot paints and dropper bottles, and have learned to adapt the latter to the former (I have much more pot paint than dropper paint). So by using "parts" as a common ratio delineator, it's a visual thing - so one part of, say, pro paint olive green to one part msp desert gold means when you put down amounts they should look roughly equal.

 

I do the same with my thinning ratios. As paint consistency may vary, they're more or less just guidelines. With practice you'll figure out the best ratio to get a certain paint to do a certain job. Though many will still find new and unusual ways to surprise you, so the experimentation never ends.

 

In general, though, I find my ratios to be reproducible when I need them again. Assuming I don't forget what the formula was in the interim.

 

Anyway, the point is there's some play to it. It's not an exact science, and where I might find 1:1 way too thin for a task, somebody else might think it's not thin enough for the same task. Who's right? Both, probably. The variance can be accounted for in method in style preferences.

 

This is also why, when I do a WIP or demo thread, I try to outline my thought process. So it's less "this is how it's done" and more "this is what I wanted, so this is what I tried". That way, hopefully, it encourages people to try something and modify it to their own ends rather than simply try to mimic the exercise. It's entirely possible (and, indeed, should happen) that something I try somebody else will improve upon when they do it. So it's less about teaching, and more about encouraging people to relax and learn what works for them.

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I do WIP threads I try to just use "parts". I'm working with pot paints and dropper bottles, and have learned to adapt the latter to the former (I have much more pot paint than dropper paint). So by using "parts" as a common ratio delineator, it's a visual thing - so one part of, say, pro paint olive green to one part msp desert gold means when you put down amounts they should look roughly equal.

 

I do the same with my thinning ratios. As paint consistency may vary, they're more or less just guidelines. With practice you'll figure out the best ratio to get a certain paint to do a certain job. Though many will still find new and unusual ways to surprise you, so the experimentation never ends.

 

In general, though, I find my ratios to be reproducible when I need them again. Assuming I don't forget what the formula was in the interim.

This, +1,000,000.

 

Honestly, does it really matter? A ratio is a ratio regardless of the unit of measurement, right?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not to mention that, at the scale we use (where we're dealing with just a few drops at a time) the margin of error is huge. None of my bottles of paint produce drops of the same size. My water dropper bottle makes relatively huge drops, and I end up dealing with differently sized drops of water. One drop of paint to one tiny drop of water. Two drops of paint to one medium drop of water. Three to a full-sized drop. And so forth. The variance is too big to pretend to have any sort of precision besides what "feels" about right. Anything more precise is guesswork and guidelines.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's the thing: Thicker paint goes on faster but will produce a courser surface. Thinner paint takes more coats but will typically produce a smoother finish. Anything we say as to ratios of paint to water/medium are guidelines. Ultimately you must apply what we talk about here and figure out what works for you. As I said in a RPG years ago, "You don't become the 20th level master of the Temple of Light through book learning." At some point you must work out what works for you and what will make you a 20th level painter.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not to mention that, at the scale we use (where we're dealing with just a few drops at a time) the margin of error is huge. None of my bottles of paint produce drops of the same size. My water dropper bottle makes relatively huge drops, and I end up dealing with differently sized drops of water. One drop of paint to one tiny drop of water. Two drops of paint to one medium drop of water. Three to a full-sized drop. And so forth. The variance is too big to pretend to have any sort of precision besides what "feels" about right. Anything more precise is guesswork and guidelines.

 

Yeah, I realized this as I was working on my first miniatures (LTPK1). My paint was coming out really thin (which is probably better than really thick) and it wasn't until after I had stopped my first shift that I realized the problem was with the dropper for the water. Even though its a nice small dropper, it was still producing much larger drops than the bottles. The main thing I've learned is simply that I won't need nearly as much paint as I thought, which helps explain the concept of brushfulls, etc. Hope to get back to the kit tonight if I am able to escape work in time, so will see how much I've learned. :p

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For me if there is a little bit too much water in my paint I just wait a little bit. It evaporates pretty quickly in FL. If I dip my brush in water and wipe it on my palette, it disappears very quickly.

 

I find that with bones I am tending to thin paint with matte medium, whereas with metal I use water. There is overlap of course.

Edited by cthulhudarren
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And if I may add a half pence to all of the above.

Some colors are so bad at covering (like yellow's, and oranges and some reds) in General.

That the only way to apply them IS USING thin thin layers.

(Just so happens that they look better that way , in my honest opinion).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, some yellows do that. It's a pigment-by-pigment basis. I know Pingo could elaborate, but I know that Palomino Gold is a different pigment (yellow ochre?) than Clear Yellow, for example, and covers much better. So you can basecoat in Palomino Gold, and then easily put Clear Yellow over it to get a bright yellow in fewer coats.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Color Theory Pearl of the Day: opacity- some pigments reflect light better- have a better refractive index. Paint may have pure pigment, or a mix of pigments imparting color, some of which have a greater opacity. Best example is adding titanium white to paint- it will tint the color, making it light, and make it more opaque. ::): Some pure pigments are transparent, others are not. Hence the need for either 1) mixing to produce desired shade or 2) many bottles of paint. Also why each company has their own proprietary paint formulas and why they are all different!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...