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MatrissaTheEnchantress

Matrissa's Unidentified Dragon

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So, I have this metal dragon that I glued together and covered with Testors grey primer back, oh, 10 to 15 years ago, in preparation for painting using Testor's enamels and then never actually got around to painting. <_<

 

His right wing got knocked off at some point when he fell off a bookshelf, largely because I didn't know you were supposed to PIN as well as glue things like wings, but also because it really hadn't been treated very carefully (there were many occasions I found it had fallen over and was lying on one side, with all its weight resting on a single wing, long before that wing came off). I glued it back on with (I think) contact cement. :blink:(green stuff? what's that?)

 

post-8855-0-38053000-1383714739.jpg

 

I'm wondering two things:

 

1: Can anyone identify the sculpt (i.e., who made it)? The figure is attached to a flat base I made for stability out of a "sample" piece of that stuff they put on kitchen counters ("stolen" from the hardware store), so I can't check the bottom for the manufacturer's name. (Note that the wings as shown might be situated more vertically than originally intended, a side effect of the all-too-common "lying on one wing" scenario mentioned above.)

 

2: Should I strip him in PineSol and start fresh or do you think that I could start with acrylics over the existing primer?

 

Thanks!

Edited by MatrissaTheEnchantress
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Interesting ... the forearm positions are different on the Mirliton variant ... can it be assembled various ways?

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/slush911/BoxedSets#5163921384673053698

It looks like the arms can

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Because the primer hasn't really obscured any detail, I see no reason to not work on it as is. The testors primer should still be a decent enough base to work on, even with acrylics.

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It may be the lighting but that gray primer looks really shiny. Are you sure its primer? If its really that shiny then you are going to have a tough time getting acrylic paint to adhere to it, there is no "tooth" for it to hold to. If its really that shiny you should strip it, if its a flat finish then you should be fine. If that's really old enamel primer Pinesol may not be enough.

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The primer is indeed shiny and smooth, it's oil-based. I've never tried painting acrylic over that type of primer, but I suspect Heisler might be right about it not working well. (And I always found that primer to be a bit thick, like all of the Testor's stuff.)

 

You could always try to put a base coat of acrylic on top and see if it sticks. If not, well you were going to have to strip it anyway...

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My go to stripping agent is now Dawn Power Dissolver. It's not in every grocery store, but Wal-mart carries it in the states. I've never tried it on Testors paint, but it tends to remove pretty mush anything very quickly. Do a search for stripping minis with it, and you'll find a dakka post about it. I don't want to crosspost.

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I used PineSol to strip paint off "old" Testor Enamel painted minis once before - in that case, the minis were the first I ever painted in the early 80's and the stripping happened in the early 2k's - and it worked quite well, (though I did need to sacrifice an old toothbrush). I also always used Testor's grey spray-on primer too, so I expect it should work even better for this since there's only a single layer of "paint" that needs to come off.

 

 

You could always try to put a base coat of acrylic on top and see if it sticks. If not, well you were going to have to strip it anyway...

 

Good point. I might just do that. Maybe even just treat it like an unprimed metal mini by starting with Reaper's brush-on primer. Hmm.

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That's a pretty sculpt. I would strip it just to get that contact cement out. When I got an old dragon that was glued together with contact cement I was kindly informed that the stuff damages old minis that have lead in them. I don't know that your dragon has lead in him, but personally, it's not a risk I'd be willing to take.

 

Plus, you could properly pin and base him.

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I wouldn't strip it. You'll never get it out of all the scales, and right now you still have good sharp detail. I would go over it with either a brush on primer like Reapers, or a light spray primer.

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If you are going to paint over him and have an airbrush, I would use it for the first coat. Because the paint is drying as it lands on the model it is more likely to stick instead of run off of that shiny stuff.

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Acrylic paint does not adhere well over oil-based paint. It tends to delaminate over time.

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If you want to stay with the old primer, I'd consider a light touch of 400 to 800 grit sandpaper. The point would be to give the primer a bit of tooth for the acrylic to attach to mechanically. Really fine grit sandpaper like that should not give you any visible surface texture on the final paint layer.

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