Jump to content

Venetian red or Bombardier Red


ioannis
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 11
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

You say you perfected the recipe, but I then you didn't tell us what it was. An oversight on your part? Perhaps a trade secret? Perhaps it's there and I just overlooked it?

 

The finished product looks very good. I'd love to know what colors you used to achieve it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, I thought the triad was called Auburn, but apparently not...this is just the name of one of the paints in the triad.

 

There is no secret...I used the Red Hair Triad as the basis: Shadow being solid, the other layers very transparent. I even went deeper with extra shadows. This last part can be variable and it's up to how large the figure is and how deep the recesses are). For example, for very deep cuts, Red Shadow works fine, for others, Mahogany Shadow is better. I used a mix also in between these two! As it happens, the larger the figure the more mixes I do between two adjacent paints and this is done by the eye as I have no way how to better describe it.

 

Anyway, the Red Hair triad is what you need, and just keep your layers very transparent or it will end up looking like a carrot!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Venetian red is red ochre pigment, a natural clay colored with iron oxide. As something dug up out of the ground, it has a lot of color variations, from orangeish to brick red ro dull, dark red-violet. The commonest ones I have seen are deep opaque brick red with slight purplish overtones.

 

It's not quite accurate to say that red textile dyes of the eighteenth century were close to Venetian red. Pigments at the time were far more limited in range than dyes were, particularly since dyes could use more vivid but fugitive colors which were fine for textiles but too short-lived for paintings.

 

Red is the commonest color after brown for natural dyes, and depending on the mordants used, a red dye could come out deep blood red, rusty orange, brownish, or even vivid pink. Even peasants could manage some bright red garments. Portraits from the eighteenth century suggest that brilliant red was not uncommon.

 

All of which is a roundabout way of saying he came up with some nice color effects, but they are not absolutely required for authenticity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pingo, I would not disagree with anything you said...this is why I mention in my blog this is just the representation of my understanding of a proper 18th century red color for military use...not all civilian clothing or paints used on paintings. And of course, I do not say this color is the only one used even for military clothing (officers would certainly use a deeper, more expensive red hue), not even the right one, certainly not The one...just my take on it - and I am happy I found it. That's all...

 

As for Venetian red, you're again not wrong...it was a brick red, but who can define the color of a brick ??? We have all seen them at so many colour variations, not to mention the way their colours deepen or fade by age.

 

Ah, it is all so captivating, so fascinating, so subjective...any other way and it would be so boring!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, for 18th century military uniforms, considering only private soldiers (to limit myself to the claim I take you to be making after retrenchment), there were many differentiated colors. Using only the KuK army of the 7YW, I've seen "red", "scarlet", "scarlet red", "poppy red", "madder red", "light rose", and "dark red" in just the regular infantry regiments. Note that these are the colors specified for procurement and are well attested in contemporaneous art.

 

If you go farther back, to the War of the League of Augsburg and the War of the Spanish Succession, you'll find a much wider range of colors in use. (The Lace Wars are an interesting period to paint, if a bit garish.)

 

You do have a nice looking color, but as Pingo noted, your claims for it are significantly over broad, even after retrenchment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glad this topic is receiving such interest...

 

Yes, again, I cannot disagree with Doug, and that is why I mention only 'red' as a red-brown, and not the other red varieties.

 

Please, guys, the emphasis is on 'my' understanding of what this red looked like...I did not proclaim myself the 'pope' of colours, I just said I found something that agrees with 'my' understanding of what I was looking for...I even gave it my own name 'Bombardier Red'.

 

"If I am wrong, then I must be an artist, because art is the science of imperfection".

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Er. I didn't mean to pile on, sorry. I have something of a pedantry gene where art, pigment, and garment history intersect.

 

I do think your effect is very nice, and I'm glad you found a way to get what you were aiming for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...