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Priming metal figs.... How much is not enough?


Bonwirn
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Maybe my search fu is weak tonight. As the last metal figures I have painted were mostly lead and painted with Testors, I am wondering how much is enough for the Reaper brush on primer? Some of the pictures I have seen look almost white, while others seem to have a bit of metal showing. Just how much is enough? I understand the too much covering the details, but I just don't have a feel for how much is enough.

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I don't think I properly understand but I too prime with reaper brush on. I always add a drop of water and a drop of black paint to bring out details better (I'm pretty blind) and I make sure to cover every nook and cranny only once!. Because of how I mix it, it takes a little longer for the primer to dry but I have never had coverage problems. The color of the primer doesn't matter as long as the metal is covered then it's fine. With bones, priming isn't important, you just have to clean them, but I'm sure you know that one.

 

So...to answer your question...one layer of primer is more than enough.

 

The other thing...sometimes with too much handling, primer will rub off, thus its important to have an anchor for your miniature so you aren't rubbing primer and paint off. I know I've had to re-prime a spot or two because I was holding a miniature by the sword or staff and the primer wiped away. I anchor them now with some tacky to a pill bottle.

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I struggled with this for a long time too. It's because almost all the pictures you see of primed minis were done with a spray primer like Tamiya, and they have a nice even coat of white on them. You brush on your primer, and it looks a bit translucent. This leaves you thinking, "I must not have done something right. Look at the pictures, they are all prettily covered with white whiteness, and my mini looks like it was given a quick dip in 2% milk." Everyone else on here has set you right, as long as you have the mini covered opacity isn't an issue. I mix white and black RMS brush on primers together because I like to prime grey. Color really doesn't matter much. Just use what you like, and happy painting.

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Also make sure to give your mini plenty of time to dry all the way when priming, especially if you plan to use it for gaming. Letting the primer harden gives the paint a good undercoat, and once you're done painting it, let the paint dry for 24hrs, then put on your varnish, which you also let dry fully. The paint job ends up being much tougher that way.

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If you want paint or primer to dry more quickly, half an hour at 200F (94C) in the oven will solve most of that.

 

(I'd recommend not trying this with Bones, BTW. ^_^ )

That's cooler than boiling water, so it actually shouldn't be a problem. Just don't let the minis touch any metal!

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If you want paint or primer to dry more quickly, half an hour at 200F (94C) in the oven will solve most of that.

 

(I'd recommend not trying this with Bones, BTW. ^_^ )

...

 

:blink:

 

...

 

AAAAAAAAH!

 

...

 

(Cough). Okay, between formaldehyde and ammonia as acrylic preservatives which can volatilize at high temperatures, the hazards of nonfood items in your kitchen oven, and the unfortunate fact that acrylic softens drastically at about 60 degrees C, I cannot recommend this.

 

A good warmover with a hair dryer can help, but the best, most time-tested method for acrylic drying and a good permanent adhesion is patience and adequate drying time. A day between priming and beginning painting is best, and certainly a day between finishing painting and sealing. It's best practice, says the person who has made a study of watching paint dry.

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While there are acrylic primers, most of the ones I use are some sort of enamel, which bakes quite nicely.

 

Plus, how much hazardous outgassing can you get from a tenth of a gram of mostly dry paint, anyway?

 

Aside from which, I don't much worry about ammonia fumes in my kitchen (otherwise I'd probably never get any cleaning done ^_^ ) -- orange or pine oil cleaners are much worse for me.

 

But then I've made intentional decisions about the risks I'm running based on safety data sheets and a bit of understanding of hazardous gases and particulates. My risk calculus may well be different than yours (for some value of "you"), so make sure you understand what risks you're choosing to accept when working with, well, anything, really.

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