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Grim

Tre Manor's Orcs - Repositioning them to fit a 1" round base

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I was going to post this in Bones, but since I couldn't post pictures there, I figured I'd do it here.

 

I'm one by one making an orc warband (no good reason, I may play them in something one day, and at any rate they'll be great for tabletop RPGs.) I love Tre Manor's orcs - the problem is they're a bit too big to fit on a 1" fender washer and if I put them on a 1 1/4" washer I can't fit them into my smaller miniature case. Besides, they'll be a bit big for our grid.

 

I went over how I fit my first Tre Manor orc, a Marauder, in this particular forum post:

 

http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/52371-reapers-gnolls-too-big/page-7

 

I was playing with an Orc Beserker (the one with the greatsword,) when on a lark I ran him under very hot water straight from the tap. It gave me enough flexibility that I gave it some thought. I chopped off a significant amount of the broccoli - I left enough to get plenty of surface area to glue down, but small enough to give me pretty much full range of motion when positioning the feet. I then microwaved some water, plunked the guy in, fished him out about a minute later and dried him off. The water was probably over a hundred degrees, but significantly cooler than boiling.

 

This gave me plenty of time to reposition the feet and glue them down on the base. It actually gave me more than that, I was dissatisfied with the front foot, so I pried it up, turned it a bit, and glued it down again. Here's a picture, sorry about the focus, it's from my cell phone:

 

post-12963-0-35991600-1386189121_thumb.jpg

 

Here is a close up of the feet:

 

post-12963-0-67090100-1386189141_thumb.jpg

 

Incidentally, to be on the safe side, after this point I did immerse him in boiling water, do some slight stance adjustments, and gave him the cold water bath. I did this mostly because I thought it might alleviate potential stresses created by doing the relatively cold water adjustment. For example - when working with metal it is best to heat up metal that you've bent (into, say, a bracelet) so the structure re-aligns to it's new configuration. This may be unnecessary with Bones, but I thought it couldn't hurt.

 

So anyway, I got an old digital camera from my dad (he's an avid amateur photographer,) but it didn't have a battery. I ordered one, if it gets here I'll continue on with this WIP. Next step - filling out the rest of the base with miliput.

 

Comments welcome!

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Another thing you could or could've done is build the base UP. So you could put him on say a rocky outcropping at an angle, the upwards lean or standing on something a little bit bigger than the base would give the illusion that he fits it perfectly.

 

Edit to add:

The other thing I like doing is building a 1inch by 1inch square on top of the round base, then you could position the figure diagonally which actually gives you more room for the feet so that it fits on the base. I've done things like that with some popsicle sticks and then painted the sticks up to look like a wood planked floor.

Edited by ub3r_n3rd

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Good ol' pliable Bones. I actually did my first boil last night on a couple Pathfinder goblins that were standing at an awkward angle. The boil and dunk worked far better than I could have imagined!

 

I, too, want to base my orcs on 1" round bases, and it's nice to see in advance that it is possible. Looking forward to the rest of this WIP!

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Another thing you could or could've done is build the base UP. So you could put him on say a rocky outcropping at an angle, the upwards lean or standing on something a little bit bigger than the base would give the illusion that he fits it perfectly.

 

Edit to add:

The other thing I like doing is building a 1inch by 1inch square on top of the round base, then you could position the figure diagonally which actually gives you more room for the feet so that it fits on the base. I've done things like that with some popsicle sticks and then painted the sticks up to look like a wood planked floor.

 

I definitely may do something like this in the future, or put one foot higher than the other to limit the "bow." My other orc (which I'll post as soon as I get the camera up and running,) looks like he's twisted his ankle slightly, this guy looks pretty good - he only looks bowlegged straight on.

 

The popsicle sticks is a neat idea, I may try that sometime.

 

Great idea that I will probably steal because I also want mine to fit on a 1" fender washer.

That's why I posted it, feel free!

 

Incidentally - the reason I was dissatisfied with the front foot position was that it looked "wrong" to me as I do several forms of SCA armed combat, and your foot should really be pointed more forward. ::):

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So, I finally got a battery for my new digital camera. It's shiny! I made up a base of miliput, that's as far as I've gotten, since I'm working on a commissioned mini at the very moment. I extrude a little miliput from the tube in a rough shape, then I dip a cheap sculpting tool in some oil (so it doesn't stick) and do some rough shaping.

 

Here are some much better pics:

 

post-12963-0-97615800-1386781041_thumb.jpg

 

And from the top:

 

post-12963-0-11774900-1386781043_thumb.jpg

 

I use the miliput as it's much cheaper than the two-part epoxy (and I just got some recently,) but it really stinks. The fumes from it are incredibly noxious, and you don't want to use your hands to manipulate the stuff, either. I was wondering - has anyone had any luck with air-dried clay? Would it be too fragile?

 

I'll probably get to painting this guy after I'm done with my current mini. I will post more when I do.

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I use the miliput as it's much cheaper than the two-part epoxy (and I just got some recently,) but it really stinks. The fumes from it are incredibly noxious, and you don't want to use your hands to manipulate the stuff, either. I was wondering - has anyone had any luck with air-dried clay? Would it be too fragile?

 

I was actually wondering about Milliput and if you could use your hands or had to wear gloves and whether or not there were fumes that were bad for you. Thanks for the heads up.

 

Never used air-dried clay here, but I have been experimenting with Sculpey the oven-baked clay. It's pretty nice and doesn't really take that long to bake, I believe it's 15 minutes per 1/4 inch thickness at 275 degrees F. If you look in my WIP threads you'll see what I've done with the stuff (Aiwen's base and Squeakers' base).

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Nice work, but I step in because I wonder... what are you guys calling milliput? The one actually used (or that I saw referenced) for sculpting is this:

 

image003.jpg

 

Which is a two-part epoxy, non-toxic, no fumes... I have the standard yellow-grey and although it is very different in handling than GS, it is not what you show here.

 

Just as a comment, since it may detract from potential people like ub3r_n3rd in getting the above stuff, and I think it is quite good actually.

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Yeah I have a the 2-part epoxy black milliput like you have pictured above Willen. I used it 1 time long ago when I first got into this painting stuff and used gloves in a well ventilated area, but then I heard great things about green stuff and haven't touched the milliput since and didn't know how people actually are supposed to handle the stuff and whether or not it was toxic or noxious.

 

Anyhow, back on topic - Good job on the basing of this figure so far Grim. Can't wait to see more of what you come up with. Also, since you mentioned you were doing a commissioned piece I really hope to see a WIP of it or the final version of it in a show off thread.

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Nice work, but I step in because I wonder... what are you guys calling milliput? The one actually used (or that I saw referenced) for sculpting is this:

 

image003.jpg

 

Which is a two-part epoxy, non-toxic, no fumes... I have the standard yellow-grey and although it is very different in handling than GS, it is not what you show here.

 

Just as a comment, since it may detract from potential people like ub3r_n3rd in getting the above stuff, and I think it is quite good actually.

 

Yes, I think I am using the term wrong. I saw it on the basing materials compendium, and since it is made by Micro Mark, I assumed it was the same thing. To be clear, I am using the "Green Putty" from micro mark, it comes in a tube and is not combined, instead it uses toluene as a drying agent. A tube was $4-5 at a local hobby store, but the stuff is dangerous. The back is full of warnings about not to touch it or breathe the fumes, and I can see why. Here is a link to the precise product:

 

http://www.micromark.com/squadron-green-putty-46-oz,6412.html

 

It is also quite sticky, though the oil definitely mitigates that, and not the easiest thing to sculpt. I'd say it's good for simple basing, but I wouldn't use it for anything other than that.

 

Yeah I have a the 2-part epoxy black milliput like you have pictured above Willen. I used it 1 time long ago when I first got into this painting stuff and used gloves in a well ventilated area, but then I heard great things about green stuff and haven't touched the milliput since and didn't know how people actually are supposed to handle the stuff and whether or not it was toxic or noxious.

 

Anyhow, back on topic - Good job on the basing of this figure so far Grim. Can't wait to see more of what you come up with. Also, since you mentioned you were doing a commissioned piece I really hope to see a WIP of it or the final version of it in a show off thread.

 

I'll definitely get it onto a show off thread when it's done, which will hopefully be by the weekend. It's actually quite neat - I'm painting up the Bones version of Judas Bloodspire as an Andoren Paladin.

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Thanks for the clarification.

 

I want to add a spoiler to my post, however. According to Milliput's MSD, it's materials can irritate skin and lungs. So better be safe than sorry.

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Okay! So I finished my last project, and I've started in on the Orc Berserker. First thing, I tried using a different base filler. I picked up some air-dry clay at Michaels, and I want to see if it holds up. I think it will, but I'll put it through the rigors of painting and transport in my minis box before I use a lot of it.

 

The material is called "Polyform Model Air" incidentally. It was about $10 for a 1 kg bag. Yes, that's a kilogram. 2.2 pounds. Enough to last pretty much forever for basing. Here is another orc based the same way:

 

post-12963-0-23621900-1387470309_thumb.jpgpost-12963-0-05445500-1387470312_thumb.jpg

 

I basecoated the skin in "Christmas Wreath" (why not!) and the armor in a mix of GW's "Runefang Steel" and Reaper's "Brown Liner." I must say, working with the brown liner is nice, it has very good coverage and flows well. The skin came out a little spotty in places because of the Bones, but I just made sure it's nice and good in the recesses. The upper areas I'm going to go over, probably many times:

 

post-12963-0-12461700-1387470398_thumb.jpg

 

I think I'll do the armor first, I like working from the center out. I washed the chain with black, and the breastplate with a mix of black and brown. I did this for a little contrast, to start the shading on the metals, and I figured the breastplate could look a little more worn than the chain.

 

post-12963-0-57178500-1387470401_thumb.jpgpost-12963-0-68756000-1387470403_thumb.jpg

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Ok. Last night I basecoated the fabric on the orc - the weird thing is the underside of the bracers is clearly fabric, not leather. Leather doesn't fall that way. That seems unwise - even the strongest fabric won't really hold armor to it very well - it has a tendency to tear. Speaking from personal experience here, actually.

 

Anyway, I'll consider alternatives for next time. I also hit the metal with another wash, the detail wasn't great. I'll restore some brightness with highlights and/or drybrushing:

 

post-12963-0-22448200-1387550120_thumb.jpg

 

This morning I had a good 40 minutes of painting time. I decided this was enough to do some layer work (maybe all the layer work) on the skin or highlight the armor, but not both. Since the former was going to be the longer part, I worked on the skin. I think I got better transitions this time. I may go a shade lighter on the face and the extreme highlights on the muscles and fingers, what do you think?

 

post-12963-0-49896600-1387550236_thumb.jpgpost-12963-0-55765100-1387550234_thumb.jpgpost-12963-0-79423300-1387550232_thumb.jpg

 

Looking at these pictures, the orc's right side of his face needs slightly more contrast too. That came out very rough in the mold, btw. I smoothed it out with some reaper matte sealer before I even started painting (thanks again, Ub3r_N3rd!)

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