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To fill or not to fill?


sigmaone
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My Bones griffon was the first and only mini I glued together, which I did a few months back after getting my first Bones. I'm looking forward to painting a larger mini, and I thought this should be my first. There is a little gap in the right wing, and I'm wondering whether I really should fill it before painting.

 

Here is a close-up:

 

DSCN0878-001.JPG

and here's the same picture from a distance:

 

DSCN0878.JPG

 

 

I've never worked with filling, sculpting, sanding etc. And I'm wondering if folks think the mini will look fine after it's painted, or if I should really fill it. (It's not going to be display piece; if ever I make a display piece, I'm years from that...) If people are of the opinion that it really should be filled, I wouldn't mind opinions on going about it. I did a search and saw Wren recommend Aves apoxie over green stuff. I just ordered some reaper green stuff earlier, but that won't be in until next week. I managed to find some Amazon Prime eligible Aves Apoxie black for under $20, so I'm wondering if I should get that. Or should I try something like Zap-A-Gap?

 

I'm sure this kind of question has been asked and answered a hundred times over, so sorry for any inconvenience.

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It depends on how tightly they fit into the slots that are made for them and if they fit snugly into the slots without just falling out you could just remove them for transport and put them in when at the table, but if they are too loose and fall out with gentle handling I'd just super-glue them in personally.

 

For this figure if I wanted it to look really good at the table/display I'd fill in the gaps with a tiny bit of green stuff, making sure to use a little bit of Vaseline (or other petroleum based product) on my fingers/tools and then shape it into the area after I've super-glued the wings into the slots. This will make them permanent though and you wouldn't be able to remove them again.

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Green stuff is pretty dang easy to work with, like I said, just make sure that you have something to keep it from sticking to your fingers/tools and you'll be fine. It's workable for a good 30-60 mins after you mix it so you'll need to give it a day to cure, after it cures hit it with some brush-on primer and paint as normal with the figure.

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I've always just waited for it to cure since it is still tacky for that hour or so after mixing it and don't want to mess up my brushes and have them somehow stick to it. Usually I do the modifications right before going to bed so that I am not tempted to keep messing with it and by the time I get around to doing it again the next evening it is already cured, but to each their own as I know that there are many ways of doing things with these cool figures.

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Clear elmers can work too.. will depend on the gap though

 

You just mean the Elmer's white glue that dries clear, right? (Though I guess it wouldn't matter since it's being painted over.) Can that be sanded down after it cures?

 

If you're not worried about curing times, Testor's Contour Putty is nice. Easily smoothable (Is that even a word?) with a wet finger, and paints up really nice. Cheaper than greenstuff and has a small-tipped applicator.

In

, he uses the phrase "contour putty" to describe the epoxy he's using, so that's the first thing I thought of. But I'm guessing that's not the same as Testor's Contour Putty, and this product is (I think) what you're referring to. In the comments for the video, someone mentions that he's actually using magic sculpt.
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I'm a stickler for details so I filled mine in, above and below the wing. I also had the trouble that the wings kept popping out even after I boiled them and pushed them in place so not gluing them in wasn't really an option for me.

griffonwings.jpg

I used green stuff. When using green stuff I recommend using some Vaseline or water-based lubricant to smooth and work with the mixture, because it can become really sticky. If you have none of either, water is better than nothing.

 

Good luck!

Edited by Cassu
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I recommend ApoxieSculpt because I find it a little easier to work with for some tasks, but the difference isn't so great that you need to jump in to ordering something else if you've already got greenstuff on the way or anything.

 

To add to some of the tips above, you can make some cheap tools by filing and sanding toothpicks to desired shapes and then coating the wood with some superglue to strengthen it. They won't last forever, but they do all right.

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