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Dr.Bedlam

Green Death, Hidden Moron

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The Pink Bedroom has been reassigned as the Library, and I have spent time today shuttling books there from assorted other places and shelves in the house. Ran across this while I was doing it...

59ad8b9600f97_51XDdueEMlL._SX258_BO1204203200_.jpg.fca3df09bc0c3f623f25cdbb5df4dc60.jpg A thing of the past. A Relic Of The Empire. A game I will not likely play, ever again. The time has passed; the world is a different place, and this book remains as proof that the past is a different country, indeed, a time when toy guns could be carried and gleefully used on each other with impunity. A time when "terrorism" meant "some jerk hijacked a plane to Cuba," and daily anxiety revolved around whether we and the Russians would launch the nukes because of a flock of geese on a radar screen. Running around shooting each other with squirt guns would be considered eccentric, certainly, but no worse than anything else one would see a college student doing in public, and a damn site better than SOME things. No one would call 911.

Sigh. Never thought I'd miss the Cold War.

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8 minutes ago, Lord of the Dish Pit said:

You're not alone in that, I'd prefer the nuclear sword of Damocles myself if it meant the return to a world whose prevailing philosophy was live and let live.

 

Well, the marginalized folk likely would not agree with your reasoning. And, admittedly, the whole reason for missing the Cold War is that against all odds, it had a happy ending.

But durn, I miss a time when you could go berserk in public with a squirt gun without winding up on CNN.

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That brought back some distant memories.

 

Early 90s, my college's game club played Killer. We used toy guns that shot plastic disks.

 

It caused... trouble around the school. From people asking security for other student's schedule, to literally shooting them in class. There were plastic disks *everywhere*!

 

Somehow, the mother of one of the students did not approve of these types of games, leading to us making the front page of the papers, and debate/outrage on radio talk shows! And I'm talking about an 18+ year old student, himself a gamer and AD&D player/DM.

 

Next time we did the game, we renamed it to something less threatening. You weren't "killed" anymore, merely "disqualified".

 

Then came the Vampire vs Vampire Hunter game. The pastoral christian club didn't really appreciate one of our rules where grabbing and tossing a vampire within the club's walls would destroy it. Mind you, some of the players were members of both clubs.

 

Also some of the best years of my life as a gamer. :devil:

 

Edited by Cranky Dog
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7 hours ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

 

Well, the marginalized folk likely would not agree with your reasoning. And, admittedly, the whole reason for missing the Cold War is that against all odds, it had a happy ending.

But durn, I miss a time when you could go berserk in public with a squirt gun without winding up on CNN.

Yeah... I would very much like to not return to the 80s please. I much prefer this world, as messed up as it is. I'm unlikely to be severely beaten for walking down the street. It's lovely.

 

That said, I thoroughly agree that being able to play games like Killer without people freaking out would be lovely. ::): 

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At the time, this would have been considered "eccentric and somewhat childish."

Nowadays it'd be considered "metal as all hell."

Times change.

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I remember playing Assassin (killer) regularly through high school and university.  When you play with other techies at an engineering school some of the traps can get pretty elaborate (the feather bomb involving a co2 seltzer bottle canister was truly a masterpiece, and got 4 players with no collateral damage!)  In high school, many of these games involves my brother.  Family dinner could get entertaining...

 

These days the only thing I've been able to get involved in is the annual zombie apocalypse at one of the local paintball fields.  Start with 5 zombies, if you are killed by a zombie you become a zombie.  If a zombie gets tagged, they have to go back to the start building before resuming the hunt.  Last 5 survivors split the prize pot.  It was a blast!

Edited by Kangaroorex
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On 9/30/2019 at 7:25 PM, Dr.Bedlam said:

At the time, this would have been considered "eccentric and somewhat childish."

Nowadays it'd be considered "metal as all hell."

Times change.

I was the winner the first three times my group played it.

 

After that I wasn't allowed to compete anymore.

 

For what it is worth, there [/i]were[/i] paintball guns in the early eighties - they were just really freaking rare. Those paintballs and guns actually started as tools - used for marking cows from a distance. ::): They were around for maybe twenty years before somebody went 'You know what might be fun?' ::o: (Well, organized, at least - I'm sure people were shooting each other with them long before somebody came up with rules.)

 

The Auld Grump - we used slingshots and water balloons. (Grenades.)

 

Wrist rockets, not the Y shaped stick version.

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23 hours ago, TheAuldGrump said:

I was the winner the first three times my group played it.

  

After that I wasn't allowed to compete anymore.

 

 You too, huh?  ::D:

 

  Unsurprisingly, I had quite an aptitude for that game back in my college days - everyone else was playing checkers and I was a freakin' chess master, lol.  :rolleyes:

I once managed to get behind a guy in a long line at the cafeteria and surreptitiously slip one of those "champagne poppers" into the pouch on his backpack, with the string tied to the zipper pulls. He sat down, reached into the pocket, said, What the...?" and wasted himself when he pulled it out to see what it was. ::D:

 

The version we played stated that you couldn't have any witnesses to a hit unless you were disguising your identity (mask, hoodie and sunglasses, scarf over face, etc.)... So it was usually either catch your target in an isolated spot or kick in the door and hose them down with squirtguns blazing...

But not me...  :B):

The one exception to the public execution rule was if nobody could tell you were the one who'd done it. I was notorious for racking up no-witness hits in crowded rooms, lol. Quite a number of my targets weren't even aware who had gotten them until I went up afterward to collect the name of my next target. 

 

  Aside from a talent for inventing dirty tricks and at least a passing proficiency in a number of relevant skills, my armament consisted of a pair of the Zebra guns that shot the little yellow rubber pellets, and a number of the cheap Halloween "switchblades" that slid back into the handle when you "stabbed" someone... :blues:

Decades before people were modding Nerf guns, I had replaced the springs in the Zebra guns to more than double their range, and replaced all the inner workings with aluminum parts for greater precision. If I was lucky enough to be aiming downwind, I could pop somebody at almost 40 ft. away, and could put a round through a sheet of newspaper at five feet. Twice I got people in public by ricocheting my shot off a wall or door.

Two of my four switchblades were also modded so that the points were rounded off and the blades weren't attached to the springs any longer. I had also more than doubled the power of the springs, so that I had a pair of "ballistic" knives with about a twelve ft. range that were easily concealable in my hands. Nobody expects to be killed from ten feet away by a guy leaning against a wall with his thumbs hooked into his pockets...

 

 Silly string noose, a "book bomb" that opened up like one of those 3D Christmas cards to say "BANG!", even a tripwire connected to a makeshift water balloon catapult...  ::D:

 

 Oh, those were fun days.

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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