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I absolutely cannot grasp blending.


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Back to the drawing board.

 

I gave another shot at wet blending and it turned out not great and took way too long to be viable to use on a regular basis. Spent about a half hour just on this leg. It is just ever frustrating that I've felt pretty good in general about my painting skill but now I just feel like a damn newbie all over again.

 

Can anyone link or recommend a really good video tutorial on wet blending or any of these blending techniques or any tutorial resources for this stuff, I've seen a lot already but I need more apparently.

 

 

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I gave another shot at wet blending and it turned out not great and took way too long to be viable to use on a regular basis. Spent about a half hour just on this leg. It is just ever frustrating that I've felt pretty good in general about my painting skill but now I just feel like a damn newbie all over again.

 

 

 

I'm no expert but my understanding is that wet blending is a technique which takes a long time and not something you would do if you were speed painting armies.

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I gave another shot at wet blending and it turned out not great and took way too long to be viable to use on a regular basis. Spent about a half hour just on this leg. It is just ever frustrating that I've felt pretty good in general about my painting skill but now I just feel like a damn newbie all over again.

 

 

I'm no expert but my understanding is that wet blending is a technique which takes a long time and not something you would do if you were speed painting armies.

Most techniques you wouldn't do when speed painting. Wet blending is relatively fast actually. Faster than most.
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It is super fast.  It's just not always super clean.  By virtue of it's name, you have to finish the blend before the paint dries.  I think it takes a lot of practice to get it perfect the first time.  I expect the pros can manage it fast and clean, but they've been painting for decades.  Last night I had a fairly un-fun session with my Grand Mother's leg armor.  I did the "heavy lifting" with the wet blending because it's quick.  But then I spent the next 2 hours cleaning up after the paint with glazing.  It was not a good painting day.  So, I guess what I'm saying is I hear your frustration, completely sympathize, and have only the "keep practicing" mantra to share.  I have no tutorials.  I think I saw one on youtube once, but didn't find it very helpful.  I learned the concept of "wet blending" from watercolors, so not very helpful either.

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Yeah I slept on it, I think maybe if I thin the paint a bit it'll be easier to blend, I was just putting paint straight into retarder which makes it rather gloopy but while I was trying to do the two brush blending again last night I kinda ended up doing wet blending with the thin paint instead and got interesting results.

 

I watched another video last night on wet blending again and I just don't quite understand how it works for some people the way it does, right now I'm going to chalk it up to not having the appropriate brushes until I get some new WN brushes.

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I'd say if that's the style you really want to paint with, stick with it and practice. Bones minis and old plastic gaming models are great for working out new techniques without stressing about the horrors you're inflicting on the poor model :)

 

My mind doesn't gel at all with wet blending, but I'd say getting your paint right is more important than the brushes (since you seem to be doing well with those brushes otherwise).

 

edit: also, those horns look good. Just because you can't get those tight parallel lines right out of the gate doesn't mean you shouldn't appreciate what you've done. Most of my painting is aiming for the mountaintop and succeeding in climbing the foothills. Because you're not in the valley anymore! Ok, sorry for torturing that metaphor.

Edited by CashWiley
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Wetblending is great but if you watch the people that are really good at it they do multiple layers of the blend (so letting it fully dry the start again) and if they're doing a display price they'll finish off the blend with some other technique after doing 2-3 wet blends.

 

The speed painters generally do 1-2 depending on the look they want and their skill with the technique but it's not easy to pick up despite looking super easy in videos.

 

The best video I've seen on it is for display prices and in French but you can buy it from CMoN on DVD (don't think there's a digital version).

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i personally prefer layering for horns. wet blending is a great technique but i find it most useful when creating smooth blends on large surfaces.

i am all about the glaze with intermediate color mixing. the key is many very thin layers - so thin that they are barely visible so that the colors below show clearly and are merely tinted and have a fuzzy edge. the thin glaze should dry very quickly so the process isnt as time consuming as you may think.

 

typically ill do something like this for simple bone colored horn:

polished bone base

bone shadow streaks

blackline base and very small streak at base

aged bone bone shadow mix negative streak in transition area

aged bone glaze in the transition area

bone shadow streak glaze at the base

polished bone highlight

linen white sharp highlight

 

the effect becomes more convincing with glazes of additional accent colors (eg, a dark skin highlight glaze around the base of the horn for a warmer ruddy feel, an ochre yellow glaze like palmino gold or saffron sunset in the transition area for a yellowy feel, etc). the more layers the better.

 

but, no matter what technique you use, practice! whenever i get stuck on something i go overboard on it until i am comfortable with it. so, paint horns, lots and lots and lots of horns.

 

Edit: another important concept here is pulling/pushing paint. that is, laying down your color where you want it then drawing it out across the transition area so that it becomes progressively thinner (pulling) or moving pigment from low density to high (pushing). for example, your streaks are nearly as dark at the tip of the streak as they are at the base. next time try putting a dab of paint at the bottom then using a wet brush draw that paint out to form the streak so that it becomes thin and nearly transparent at the end. repeat multiple times in combination with glazes to create a smooth transition.

Edited by vulture
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Vulture, what you are describing is basically 2 brush blending, right? Apply paint, clean the brush (or use another one, hence the name), use a clean wet brush to pull the border of the paint into the transition.

 

Cash, that way you actually kinda dillute it further only in that area, increasing transparency. It works... as always, it is best to stick with one method, one you feel comfortable with, and build experience, expertise and speed with it, IMHO.

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