Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Hellcow

Things I have learned while Boiling Bones

Recommended Posts

 

So hot tap water to cold tap water can work, but a quick transition from boiling to near-freezing water is better.

 

From what I've read (and experienced), anything less than a good rolling boil is unlikely to hold the corrected position.  I think it might work on small pieces (spears, sword blades, etc.), but I'd be surprised if it held anything thicker (unless your tapwater is incredibly hot).

 

This is true. Hot-to-cold tapwater just isn't enough. I've tried on several models with bent swords/spears/staves/etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Owlbears are insane. That is all you need to know

 

I wish I could convince my one Druid playing player of this.  He wanted to save the Owlbears and let them take their 'natural' place in nature. :rock:

 

 

did you get into the irony of having him eaten by owlbears? I would have

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Owlbears are insane. That is all you need to know

 

I wish I could convince my one Druid playing player of this.  He wanted to save the Owlbears and let them take their 'natural' place in nature. :rock:

 

 

Actually, that kind of brings up an interesting possibility for a "schism" of sorts for druidic circles.  When supernatural creatures are introduced to an ecology, are those exempt from druidic teaching (or whatever they call it), or do druids try to incorporate such creatures into their "balance of nature" philosophy?  I could definitely see two different druidic circles clashing over this issue.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I discovered last night,  you don't actually have to boil bones.  If you have sufficiently hot water you can just do it from the tap.  Makes that pot and risking contaminating it unnecessary.

Yeah, about contaminating the pot.  Anyone else notice white spots that wont scrub off easily on their pot after boiling bones?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

So hot tap water to cold tap water can work, but a quick transition from boiling to near-freezing water is better.

 

From what I've read (and experienced), anything less than a good rolling boil is unlikely to hold the corrected position.  I think it might work on small pieces (spears, sword blades, etc.), but I'd be surprised if it held anything thicker (unless your tapwater is incredibly hot).

 

This is true. Hot-to-cold tapwater just isn't enough. I've tried on several models with bent swords/spears/staves/etc.

 

I've used very hot tapwater to reposition feet - it does make the model sufficiently pliable that you can rearrange the feet and then glue them down to a washer.  I wouldn't trust it for anything that is not anchored, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really THIN pieces can be done with low heat -- I've used a hair dryer with some success -- but for anything reasonably thick, just boil the thing.

And don't be dissin' the owlbear. After some of the static owlbears I've seen, I like the one Jason did. Makes all my other owlbears look taxidermified.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had a fair amount of luck dumping freshly boiled water into a sink full of Bones, followed by an ice bath.  Wasn't really keen to watch a pot of Bones on my stove.  Depending on how hot your water heater is set, I can see hot tap water working for minor problems.  It probably depends on when the warping took place, I don't think I've had to deal with a really bad one. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For sufficiently small minis, I've taken to microwaving a mug of water and dunking them in that. No need to contaminate a whole pot, to say nothing of wasting all that water and heat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I discovered last night,  you don't actually have to boil bones.  If you have sufficiently hot water you can just do it from the tap.  Makes that pot and risking contaminating it unnecessary.

Yeah, about contaminating the pot.  Anyone else notice white spots that wont scrub off easily on their pot after boiling bones?

 

 

This is why I just boil water in a kettle and then pour it into a container dedicated only for bending plastic or resin models.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only seen some faint "fogging" near the watermark, which I assume is some of the residue from boiling.  I wash the pot after boiling, but I think I may set it aside to be a dedicated (non-food) pot.  It's seen better days, anyways...  ::P:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only seen some faint "fogging" near the watermark, which I assume is some of the residue from boiling.  I wash the pot after boiling, but I think I may set it aside to be a dedicated (non-food) pot.  It's seen better days, anyways...  ::P:

 

I did the same with the pot that I did my Bones in. 

 

For the same reason too!  It was losing a lot of its finish anyways.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I discovered last night,  you don't actually have to boil bones.  If you have sufficiently hot water you can just do it from the tap.  Makes that pot and risking contaminating it unnecessary.

Yeah, about contaminating the pot.  Anyone else notice white spots that wont scrub off easily on their pot after boiling bones?

 

Oh, that could be bad, I've heard boiling bones actually takes away some of their softness so that might be plasticizer leaching out of the surface of the mini.

 

 

 

Owlbears are insane. That is all you need to know

 

I wish I could convince my one Druid playing player of this.  He wanted to save the Owlbears and let them take their 'natural' place in nature. :rock:

 

 

Actually, that kind of brings up an interesting possibility for a "schism" of sorts for druidic circles.  When supernatural creatures are introduced to an ecology, are those exempt from druidic teaching (or whatever they call it), or do druids try to incorporate such creatures into their "balance of nature" philosophy?  I could definitely see two different druidic circles clashing over this issue.

I'd make that one of the major druid political issues. That and human(oid) sacrifice. 

 

I've only seen some faint "fogging" near the watermark, which I assume is some of the residue from boiling.  I wash the pot after boiling, but I think I may set it aside to be a dedicated (non-food) pot.  It's seen better days, anyways...  ::P:

Yeah, I got a small broken pot used only for hard boiling eggs so that should be fine for bones too.

Edited by Frankthedm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's actually the sudden transition from hot to cold that forces the material to relearn its positioning, and the bigger the jump the more likely it is to work. So hot tap water to cold tap water can work, but a quick transition from boiling to near-freezing water is better.

 

I've tried several times to get a Bone to 'learn' a new shape (ie, repositioning a limb) using lengthy boiling --> freezing ice baths with zero success.  Slowly but surely the model will eventually ease back to it's molded shape.  Heating will straighten bent models (ie, they spring right back to their molded shape as soon as the heat renders them pliable), but I'm pretty convinced that there's no 'relearning' going on as part of a rapid boiling-to-cold transition.  I think the cold bath only makes them firm quickly so they don't sag while cooling naturally.

 

Are others having luck actually permanently repositioning Bones, or are we just talking about reverting bent parts to their original (molded) shape?  I thought repositioning was initially reported as being possible, but later de-bunked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having worked in plastics in the auto industry I can tell you it is possible to reposition parts if you bend them beyond their elastic limits. However the soft PVC Reaper uses has too much elasticity for that. You best bet is to cut and reposition with crazy glue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Kuroneko
      I'm sure many of you can sympathise- we see a cool model in a kickstarter, finally get it delivered and then sit flummoxed whilst trying to figure out exactly how to paint said mini. This Mystic Portal has been sitting on my painting desk since last June and I finally figured out what to do with it.
       
      Imagine that your players have just finished ransacking your meticulously planned dungeon/keep/cavern system. They've breezed through the encounters, possibly due to good dice rolls or possibly that they're a bunch of min/maxing little murder hobos. What you need is one final encounter, one last chance for them to shine or to let them spectacularly fail.
       
       There's one last room left and it's securely locked. It'll certainly be magically warded and if I know my players then that's a challenge that they won't be able to pass up. Inside the room is a single portal, made of nondescript stone but with stunning looking gems set into the eyes of it's carved dragons. Surely none of them would be daft enough to trigger an obviously dangerous portal?
       
      You haven't met my players
       
      My plan to paint one side of the portal the naturalistic stone colour and to paint the other side the fully active, just about to summon a multi headed dragon, portal. This means that when they invariably trigger it, all I have to do is spin it around and savour their worried/confused faces Here's hoping that I can actually do it justice.
       
      This is the portal. It's cast in translucent bonesium, which I like because it gives you a choice between taking advantage to it's see through quality or to just paint it like a normal mini. I opted to paint it as normal.
       

       
      There was a slight bit of warping on the base piece, but the old 'boiling/ice water' trick sorted it out in 5 minutes. I'm planning on setting the base on some warning runes, so I used the Greenstuff World Dwarven rolling pin on some foam to see how it would fit onto the pattern.
       

       
      On to the painting! I painted the inactive side of the portal Cloudy Grey 9089 and the active side Pure Black 9037.
       

       

       
      I'm not sure if I'm going to fuzz up this line or leave it as a stark contrast.
       

       
      I added a black/ green wash to dirty up the stone and added a little bit of orange to the stone to give it a little bit of texture
       

       
      The real work begins! I started blocking in the colours for the active side of the portal. Red, purplish black, white, green and blue. It's almost as if I'm trying to match my half finished Ma'al Drakar
       


       
      My coordination went a bit wobbly with the foo dogs(which are awesome, btw!) so that's where I left it for tonight. We've got a storm coming in tomorrow, so I'm hoping to get some more work done on it tomorrow. Any comments/criticism/suggestions are, as always, warmly received.
       
    • By Inarah
      Speed paint job that I did as part of my 4th of July Paint Binge this year.  I was vaguely going for crazy Rutger Hauer from Blade Runner, with the white hair. 
       

       
       
    • By Iridil
      This was a fun sculpt - orange octopus definitely inspired by others :)


    • By Inarah
      Got this guy in my Bones Paint & Take Home Survival Kit earlier this year.  He was done with lots of sloppy washes and dry brushing. I put flock on its exposed twigs, for decency's sake. 
       

       
    • By Inarah
      Durgam Deepmug, one of several figures I picked at random to paint for table use during the early weeks of covid-19 lockdown.  I tried a little magical/ ice effect on his sword. 
       

       
       
       
       
  • Who's Online   21 Members, 1 Anonymous, 36 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...