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Evening, all,

 

I'm trying to make a little diorama for one of my well-painted minis and wanted to place him in a ruined temple.  I have made a structural base out of some wood and was planning to model the temple bricks out of greenstuff to set the scene.  This is, however, my first go at modeling pretty much anything, so I'm not sure how it went.  I made a little 'test wall' on some cardboard, poked at it with a few modeling tools and an Exacto knife and thought I'd post the results here to get some feedback:

 

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My procedure was pretty straightforward:

 

1) Mix greenstuff

2) Mash onto board

3) Draw lines in greenstuff with knife where rocks should go

4) Round edged of rocks with round modeling tool (sticky!)

5) Redraw lines where rocks didn't seem separated enough

6) Tap a rough rock on a few spots to add texture

7) Poke around with knife and other tools to add character.

 

Kind words would be nice, but constructive criticism would be MUCH appreciated.  This is my first real attempt at modeling anything substantial.  

 

Thanks!

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Looks good!  Looks like stone!  If you want a ruined look, I'd suggest actually carving or chipping the edges after it's dry.  I like vaseline to keep tools from sticking as well.  Depending on how big an area you're sculpting, greenstuff might get expensive.  I like sculpey for bigger projects because it's cheaper and you can play with it forever because it doesn't self-harden.

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Sculpting is my weak point, so I don't have a ton of advice to offer on that front - from what I can see, it looks like a pretty good start, and better than most of what I manage with greenstuff.  And once you paint it up, you can always add detail (notches, weathering, etc.) with paint wizardry, and/or basing elements (some kinds of flock double nicely for moss).  

 

(Also, nice to see a project from you, Noel!  The holidays knocked me off the boards for a bit, but it's good to see some familiar folks around now that I'm poking around again!)

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Sculpting is my weak point, so I don't have a ton of advice to offer on that front - from what I can see, it looks like a pretty good start, and better than most of what I manage with greenstuff.  And once you paint it up, you can always add detail (notches, weathering, etc.) with paint wizardry, and/or basing elements (some kinds of flock double nicely for moss).  

 

(Also, nice to see a project from you, Noel!  The holidays knocked me off the boards for a bit, but it's good to see some familiar folks around now that I'm poking around again!)

You too!  My projects go pretty slowly these days.  I don't paint for long stretches and don't use my minis for anything, so there's not much of an impetus to get stuff churned out.  I'm excited about this project, though.  I'm thinking about bringing it up for ReaperCon.  

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Hey there! Glad to see your name on the new posts screen!

 

I like what you've got, here. It looks very wallish, so that's a good start. My first forays into greenstuff (that weren't gap-filling projects) we're for basing, and I have a few early bases that look pretty similar to what you have here. Good texture, nice deep creases between stones. Good stuff.

 

I would suggest you find a glass or ceramic tile, since cboard is pretty porous and may give you a hell of a time removing the finished piece. Also, smooth plastic will work; if you're not doing much cutting into the mat behind the putty you could even use saran wrap or cut up a Ziploc. Plastic sheet like a Ziploc is also great for putting over a blob of putty to mush it into shape or roll it flat without imparting fingerprints.

 

I usually wet my hands to mix the putty without getting it stuck to me. For tools, I used water for a long time but have been using petroleum jelly and it works like a charm. Just make sure to wash the cured piece before you try to paint it.

 

Last, everything I just said is regurgitated from things I've learned here on the boards. Derek Schubert's posts are quite often full of good info about sculpting even if you aren't trying to put new fittings on a scabbard; Talespinner is also an invaluable resource (his wip on sculpting Dobermans was awesome). And you should totally check out Patrick Keith's blog.

 

Back to this bit of wall...aesthetically, I'd personally like the overall rough texture to be a little more defined. The nicks and gouges you put in look nice, but the overall texture is kinda between "polished smooth" and "rough-hewn," and I'd like a little more definite decision between the two.

 

Do more! I'm glad you're doing a project you're keen on, and I'm doubly glad to know you're likely to hit Rcon again this year!

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