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P3 Paint Color Range


cldudley
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Although I have hated the pots the P3 paints came in, the paints themselves have been consistently pretty excellent, maybe my favorite so far after working with the different sets I've tried (VMC, VGC, P3, GW, AP). I don't know if it has to do with the "liquid pigments" or some other property, but they just seem to cover smoothly and thin down perfectly for me every time, and over the last couple months I have actually gotten accustomed to the paint pots I cursed originally.

 

Now my question. The color selection in the P3 line is a lot smaller than the other lines I am using. At first glance, it looks like all of the critical colors are represented well enough for it not to matter so much as long as I am willing to mix colors, which so far I haven't had TOO much trouble with. I am, however, a beginning painter, and speak from a position of inexperience, possibly ignorance of a lot of topics that will become important as I advance in my painting.

 

Does anyone else use the P3 line primarily, and have you found particular colors or color combinations that just aren't easy to get from their range?

 

This board has a ton of great painters, do you guys normally mix your paints for the colors and tones you want, or do you keep a bazillion colors around to always have one you want at hand?

 

*EDIT* I listed MSP in my "used lines" list, but I meant Army Painter. Freudian slip? ;-)

Edited by cldudley
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I believe both MSP and P3 are based on liquid pigments. The difference in medium is what gives P3 paints their 'plasticity'. On the other hand, MSP's medium gives easier control. I use both ranges and I am equally happy! I have long now sold or tossed all my other brands, and I have used them ALL..!!!

 

On the Privateer website there is a mixing guide that provides the shade-base-highlight combinations you need...It's a good starting point and some combinations will surprise you but they do work. The only point to note is that these combinations are not meant to work as the MSP triads (that is, first you apply shade, then you layer on the base and the highlight). The P3 proposed combinations are for you first to select your base color, then you mix in some (say 50:50 is a good starting point, you can adjust in later experiments based on how much contrast you want) of the shade, and you paint the first layer. The second layer can be the base straight, and the third layer is again a mix of the base plus highlight (I use a 75% base and 25% highlight).

 

Mixing P3 paints is fun, and having them premixed in MSP paints is easy...so, I have the best of both worlds!

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I had read that somewhere about the P3 paints being the same as Coat d'Arms, although I thought that the P3 was the only model paint that used liquid pigments?

 

I am seriously considering buying the rest of the P3 line to fill out my paints. I have been using a lot of VMC, but the amount of shaking required, and then it's tendency to separate out on the palette afterwards, is really starting to annoy me. Doubly so when my P3 gets one quick rap and it's perfect for a couple hours on the wet palette with no more muss.

 

Any idea where one gets Coat d'Arms in the US? I primarily buy through Miniature Market and The War Store.

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Indeed, Coat d'Arms and P3 are made by the same manufacturer, who also makes Foundry paints and used to make Citadel paints. But, having had similar colors  from this same manufacturer behaving differently, I must say, they do have different formulations for different manufacturers. In fact, I believe, and this is only my own experience, P3 have changed their formulas recently to make paints flow better (to the detriment of coverage), but they do behave now more like MSP paints in terms of control, without losing their plasticity.

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I had read that somewhere about the P3 paints being the same as Coat d'Arms, although I thought that the P3 was the only model paint that used liquid pigments?

 

I am seriously considering buying the rest of the P3 line to fill out my paints. I have been using a lot of VMC, but the amount of shaking required, and then it's tendency to separate out on the palette afterwards, is really starting to annoy me. Doubly so when my P3 gets one quick rap and it's perfect for a couple hours on the wet palette with no more muss.

 

Any idea where one gets Coat d'Arms in the US? I primarily buy through Miniature Market and The War Store.

Not sure, but I'm in Canada and just order straight from the source at Black Hat Miniatures in the UK. Worth a look there anyway, since I think that's the only website that shows all the colours of the line.

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I believe both MSP and P3 are based on liquid pigments. The difference in medium is what gives P3 paints their 'plasticity'. On the other hand, MSP's medium gives easier control. I use both ranges and I am equally happy! I have long now sold or tossed all my other brands, and I have used them ALL..!!!

 

On the Privateer website there is a mixing guide that provides the shade-base-highlight combinations you need...It's a good starting point and some combinations will surprise you but they do work. The only point to note is that these combinations are not meant to work as the MSP triads (that is, first you apply shade, then you layer on the base and the highlight). The P3 proposed combinations are for you first to select your base color, then you mix in some (say 50:50 is a good starting point, you can adjust in later experiments based on how much contrast you want) of the shade, and you paint the first layer. The second layer can be the base straight, and the third layer is again a mix of the base plus highlight (I use a 75% base and 25% highlight).

 

Mixing P3 paints is fun, and having them premixed in MSP paints is easy...so, I have the best of both worlds!

 

MSPs are not designed specifically for the shade color to be laid down first. That's just one technique. Many of the painters here lay down the MSP mid-tone first and shade and highlight from there.

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No one uses powdered pigments to make paint anymore, except for maybe art students. All hobby or house paint is made from liquid pigments. Any textures that you might see in paint is from additives not from the pigment.

 

This intrests me. One of the big claims made for the formula P3 paints is the "liquid pigment" that is supposed to be superior to whatever everyone else is using. Of the current ranges I've used and listed in my top post, the P3 is the only range that doesn't seem to separate in it's container.

 

I can leave one of my P3 colors set for a couple months, open it, and the paint is still mixed and the consistency is good. My other main line, the Vallejo Model Color (and ESPECIALLY the VGC) will separate into what I assume is the pigment and mediums within a couple of hours. I have "almost" the full line of Army Painter WarPaints (I don't have black or white, who needs 8 of those?) and have found them to separate also, although I rarely use them anyway because I've had them become grainy when I water them down.

 

I had presumed that the only difference with the P3 paints was the "liquid pigment" and that kept them from separating like the other colors do, but you are saying it is the mediums and additives instead?

 

Is there an additive/medium/mixture I can add into my other paints to help their separation anxiety? ;-)

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I was under the impression that P3 and Reaper paints were the only ones using liqued pigments as well and thats why they water down so well.

 

This might need a Pingo or Anne answer.  Though I have a feeling it's been answered by Anne before somewhere.

Edited by MonkeySloth
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I was under the impression that P3 and Reaper paints were the only ones using liqued pigments as well and thats why they water down so well.

 

This might need a Pingo or Anne answer.  Though I have a feeling it's been answered by Anne before somewhere.

 

I got my answer from Anne on the liquid pigments since everyone uses them its not really much of a selling point once you know that. Things that make paints different from each other are the base being used and any additives put in by the manufacturer. For instance MSPs have flow improver already in the paint.

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