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Any ladies with some good corset experience? It is quite possibly the most annoying thing to shop for. I'm an old waist trainer but haven't been in the practice for years. I most likely won't tight lace for the convention but loss of inches and shape would be nice. I'm supposed to be getting one from Merchentes butttttt it isn't the most reliable company in the world. Corset-Story.com has a great deal on a variety but also aren't fantastic. Who else am I missing? :O

 

I'm not a lady, but take a look at Pendragon\Mad Girl\Silc. Conveniently, if you are inclined to skip a little bit of the con, you can find them at the Scarborough Renaissance Faire, located on the other side of Dallas from Lewisville in Waxahachie, TX. You can also find them online, of course. I'll refrain from linking to them directly, as that might be considered a violation of the commerce stuff, and I've no desired to be mod-batted.

 

~v

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Alsnia~ Hello my friends!!!! This is my costume for comic con 2015, (Lady Ciel from Black Butler, pronounced See-El) and i was like "HEY..............I could totally post this........" WELL HERE YOU

Test run of the UFO costume complete:

Going to call myself MissMelons this year and dress up accordingly.

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Any ladies with some good corset experience? It is quite possibly the most annoying thing to shop for. I'm an old waist trainer but haven't been in the practice for years. I most likely won't tight lace for the convention but loss of inches and shape would be nice. I'm supposed to be getting one from Merchentes butttttt it isn't the most reliable company in the world. Corset-Story.com has a great deal on a variety but also aren't fantastic. Who else am I missing? :O

I'm not a lady, but take a look at Pendragon\Mad Girl\Silc. Conveniently, if you are inclined to skip a little bit of the con, you can find them at the Scarborough Renaissance Faire, located on the other side of Dallas from Lewisville in Waxahachie, TX. You can also find them online, of course. I'll refrain from linking to them directly, as that might be considered a violation of the commerce stuff, and I've no desired to be mod-batted.

 

~v

I'm not a lady, but I have lots of experience lacing one into corsets. The preference is Damsel in This Dress. Available online...not cheap, but also Not Cheap (the former refers to money, the latter to quality). These suckers are gorgeous, available in many styles, and have held up to summers of Shakespeare in the Park as well as long days at the World's Dustiest (or muddiest, when there's rain) Ren Faire.

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Absolutely love Pendragons corsets, too bad its so far from Reaper Con :\ I know about Damsel in this Dress but it seems she only has one style of corset going on right now and they all tie in the front. Which is fine, but now what I'm looking for. :p 

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This is for Bryan if he comes across this! I figured other people might be interested in this as well. The Reapercon website says specifically:

 

"*Come by the Registration Desk each day you wear a qualifying shirt or costume to receive these ReaperBucks. No repeat gains." 

 

So if my husband and I went to the desk each day (four days) of reaper con, Costumed, we would get 100 points each a day per costume? or is it one time only as in the "No Repeat Gains"? Because before that it says Each Day to come to the desk if we're wearing a costume or a shirt.

 

Then what qualifies as a costume? Something that goes with the theme? or just a costume in general? Different costume each day? (Not that I'd wear the same clothing every day, I have two varieties of my costume as does my husband) 

 

As is I'm unsure if we'd wreck in 200 points together or  800 points for wearing a costume every day. 

Edited by MissMelons
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That's a per day award, per person. So yes, if you decked out in costume each day, you'd each earn 400 Reaperbucks over the course of the con (800 total for the two of you). I'm reasonably certain that the "Themed Costume" part is capitalized for a Reason, as in the Costume must match the Theme of this year's con. Coming as a pirate won't score you any Reaperbucks; coming as a saloon girl would.

 

At the very least, the "no repeat gains" means you can't hit the registration desk multiple times in a single day. I think they probably don't care too much if you wear the same costume on two different days (though we'd all appreciate people not smelling like it). After all, some of us have multiple RCon shirts from a single year (I have two '09's for some reason)...

 

Obviously, the whole point of this is to get people in the spirit of the theme, as well as feeling like part of the Reaper club (hey, look! we all have the same shirts!). The more people that participate in this manner the more times, the better the event is (and the pictures that turn up online afterwards).

 

~v

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This is for Bryan if he comes across this! I figured other people might be interested in this as well. The Reapercon website says specifically:

 

"*Come by the Registration Desk each day you wear a qualifying shirt or costume to receive these ReaperBucks. No repeat gains." 

 

So if my husband and I went to the desk each day (four days) of reaper con, Costumed, we would get 100 points each a day per costume? or is it one time only as in the "No Repeat Gains"? Because before that it says Each Day to come to the desk if we're wearing a costume or a shirt.

 

Then what qualifies as a costume? Something that goes with the theme? or just a costume in general? Different costume each day? (Not that I'd wear the same clothing every day, I have two varieties of my costume as does my husband) 

 

As is I'm unsure if we'd wreck in 200 points together or  800 points for wearing a costume every day. 

 

 

That's a per day award, per person. So yes, if you decked out in costume each day, you'd each earn 400 Reaperbucks over the course of the con (800 total for the two of you). I'm reasonably certain that the "Themed Costume" part is capitalized for a Reason, as in the Costume must match the Theme of this year's con. Coming as a pirate won't score you any Reaperbucks; coming as a saloon girl would.

 

At the very least, the "no repeat gains" means you can't hit the registration desk multiple times in a single day. I think they probably don't care too much if you wear the same costume on two different days (though we'd all appreciate people not smelling like it). After all, some of us have multiple RCon shirts from a single year (I have two '09's for some reason)...

 

Obviously, the whole point of this is to get people in the spirit of the theme, as well as feeling like part of the Reaper club (hey, look! we all have the same shirts!). The more people that participate in this manner the more times, the better the event is (and the pictures that turn up online afterwards).

 

~v

In a nutshell, yes, you could get the Costume bonus 4 days in a row, and so could Mr. Melons.  What you could not do is:

A) Get the Costume gain twice in one day, for changing costumes.

B) Get the Costume Gain, go change, and get the T-shirt Gain.

C) Some other combination of collecting Bucks for clothing that we have not thought of that amounts to collecting the "reward for one of the 3 supported clothing types" twice in the same day.

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Ah yes, I figured that that was the case. I just didn't want to get a talking to if I wear a costume more than once. If I can get this corset thing settled then my costume won't be a problem. :p If it doesnt..........I may have to use an old one. o.o

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Alright, I had to ask. Which sort of Western are we representing here? All forms of western, which has a pretty broad spectrum, The era of the cowboy, the time itself which represents more than the wild west that we know of, Traditional spagetti westerns? Dare I say: Wild Wild West (steampunk cowboys)? 

 

My costumes already decided but this is a deciding factor between if I'm going top hat steam punk style or triangle feather hat or no hat at all but feathers all burlesque like. 

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Alright, I had to ask. Which sort of Western are we representing here? All forms of western, which has a pretty broad spectrum, The era of the cowboy, the time itself which represents more than the wild west that we know of, Traditional spagetti westerns? Dare I say: Wild Wild West (steampunk cowboys)? 

 

My costumes already decided but this is a deciding factor between if I'm going top hat steam punk style or triangle feather hat or no hat at all but feathers all burlesque like. 

valid costumes need not strictly adhere to theme, but for those interested in adhering to theme:

1. Our mascot is a vulture winged ex-civil war cavalry succubus with some indication of clockwork mechanism on her belt and rifle stock.  The limits of "western" are fairly broad, assuming Sophie is leading your charge over the bluff to get those blasted cattle rustlers.

2. Spaghetti Westerns - yes, but please do not include powdered parmesan cheese, it is hard to clean up.

3. traditional cowboy era (1870's-1930's era) Sure.  Please do not bring livestock.

4. Wild wild west - yes.  If you can convince Will Smith to come, I'd love to meet him.

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Alright, I had to ask. Which sort of Western are we representing here? All forms of western, which has a pretty broad spectrum, The era of the cowboy, the time itself which represents more than the wild west that we know of, Traditional spagetti westerns? Dare I say: Wild Wild West (steampunk cowboys)? 

 

My costumes already decided but this is a deciding factor between if I'm going top hat steam punk style or triangle feather hat or no hat at all but feathers all burlesque like. 

valid costumes need not strictly adhere to theme, but for those interested in adhering to theme:

1. Our mascot is a vulture winged ex-civil war cavalry succubus with some indication of clockwork mechanism on her belt and rifle stock.  The limits of "western" are fairly broad, assuming Sophie is leading your charge over the bluff to get those blasted cattle rustlers.

2. Spaghetti Westerns - yes, but please do not include powdered parmesan cheese, it is hard to clean up.

3. traditional cowboy era (1870's-1930's era) Sure.  Please do not bring livestock.

4. Wild wild west - yes.  If you can convince Will Smith to come, I'd love to meet him.

 

Wild Wild West, in this case nothing beats the original, Robert Conrad was the man.

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