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Baugi

Baugi's Basing Basics for Beginners

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That looks SPLENDID. You have a nice texture to the stone, which is something that is difficult to achieve with Green Stuff. I do something similar with plumber's epoxy putty...getting texture is a snap & drying time is about 10 minutes. I'm looking forward to the next step...there's always some new way of doing things.

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I picked some of the wood filler up after seeing it in your list of 5 must haves for basing and was wondering how long you let it dry before doing the sanding and carving. This is a great idea and I cannot wait to try it.

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I usually leave it overnight, but I'm sure that's not necessary. I tend to just spread some in 5 or 6 bases at a time, and use them when necessary. I always seem to have a ready blank that way.

 

Edit: Malefactus- I used plumbers putty for a few of my early ones. I much prefer it to this stuff, as it's much sturdier once dried, but I didn't like having to work it with gloves. The stuff I bought at least was like half BPA, so I've been a little wary of it since.

Edited by Baugi

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I don't know why these are posting sideways... but it really doesn't matter in this case, so whatever!

 

Base primed with gesso.  Without, the putty absorbs a LOT of paint, and doesn't quite look right.

post-8809-0-44472500-1392657607_thumb.jpg

 

Painted stone grey, and dark-washed.  I usually do a few washes, just to make sure all the little cracks get some colour (you can see a few of the little nooks here haven't).

post-8809-0-81790900-1392657613_thumb.jpg

Edited by Baugi
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post-8809-0-73621000-1392712630_thumb.jpg

After a few more washes, including a dark blue, and a red-brown.

 

post-8809-0-57353000-1392712818_thumb.jpg

Started with P3 Thornwood Green, as seen here.

 

After the layer of Thornwood, the base got thin layers of:

Thornwood Green/Stone Grey,

Stone Grey,

Stone Grey/Rainy Grey,

and Rainy Grey, 

resulting in...

 

post-8809-0-58157600-1392713220_thumb.jpg

 

... with which I'm quite happy.  It'll get a few more touch-ups to the border with the actual base, maybe a wee bit of edge highlighting, and then be used for the Almaran mini currently underway in my WIP thread. 

 

 

Now, I will make a note here about the use of this sort of material for basing.  It carves and sands nicely, which is fantastic.  It's easy to repair if it gets dinged, but therein lies the disadvantage.  If your bases are on minis that are going to be used roughly, this might not be the ideal material for you.  It holds together very well, but doesn't take well to direct impact.  Drop a heavy metal mini in such a way that a pointy bit strikes this base, and it will likely chip or crack.  It seems that's the sacrifice for it being so easy to use.  There are alternatives, such as plumber's putty, as mentioned above by Malefactus.  That stuff can take a bomb blast and come out unscathed, but the versions that I've used are 2-part affairs like greenstuff, meaning they need to be worked with your hands.  The downside of this, again, with the brands I've tried, is that they are really quite toxic, and I don't much like wearing gloves while I work, so for me, things like wood filler are great.  Most of my minis are used lightly, if at all, and my players know to be careful with them.

 

Next:  Basing a Warforged!  Probably! 

Edited by Baugi
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Hmm I wonder how my faux stone for exterior buildings would work and hold up.. its a combo of lightweight exterior spackle and quickrete

Worth a shot!

 

 

Now to decide what to do for my warforged.  He is a PC for a brief D&D campaign, so I don't want to do anything too complicated or fidgety.  No branches sticking out that could break, or sand or particulate to spray all over the place when I drop it.  He does have a fairly outdoorsy backstory (mysterious, taciturn guardian of a mountainous region that's seldom visited).  I'm thinking cork rocks, bit of snow, probably some shrubbery or a few dead leaves.... ideas anyone?

Edited by Baugi
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Now to decide what to do for my warforged.  He is a PC for a brief D&D campaign, so I don't want to do anything too complicated or fidgety.  No branches sticking out that could break, or sand or particulate to spray all over the place when I drop it.  He does have a fairly outdoorsy backstory (mysterious, taciturn guardian of a mountainous region that's seldom visited).  I'm thinking cork rocks, bit of snow, probably some shrubbery or a few dead leaves.... ideas anyone?

 

 

I like the cork rocks and shrubbery, you could do a stump or fallen log that stays within the base itself pretty easily, cover it with some snow as well.

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The other consideration of course, is that the mini in question (the Bones iron golem) is quite tall to begin with, and while Warforged are large compared to an average human, they're not like.. Goliath large.  I don't know if a layered cork base, adding an extra cm or 2, is a great idea... hmmm...

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Funny thing about the warforged minis is that most of them are about the same size as most of the goliath minis I have seen.  I know minis mean nothing in the fantasy world but I was just sayin'.

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Okay! So!  Warforged Warden with a strangely outdoorsy backstory.  Guy's spent the last couple hundred years patrolling a mountain range, is the short version.  So we want outdoorsy, we want stone, and maybe a little snow.

 

Mountain base

 

Materials:

Round lipped base

elmer's wood filler

cork

cyanoacrylate (super glue)

Golden brand pumice gel

Various kinds of flock

 

Fill slot in base with wood filler!

post-8809-0-17282400-1393492660_thumb.jpg

 

add cork rocks with superglue!

post-8809-0-45243800-1393492684_thumb.jpg

 

add pumice gel or sand or whatever you have between rocks!

post-8809-0-45264900-1393492749_thumb.jpg

 

Further steps when I get 'em done!

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Prime the whole thing - I use gesso for cork bases or anything with more complicated textures.  I primed in grey, then painted the ground a combination of Walnut and Blackened brown, and the rocks in stone grey mixed with a little walnut.

post-8809-0-11109600-1393674736_thumb.jpg

 

Lighten the stone with progressive drybrushes of stone grey up to rainy grey or higher.  Similar with ground, adding some shield brown and AP desert yellow.

post-8809-0-84933900-1393674745_thumb.jpg

 

Add shrubs!  I was in a bit of a rush (I'm playing with the mini this is going on in a game tonight), or this would've been a little more composed.  

post-8809-0-78376800-1393674756_thumb.jpg

 

Mix up some snow!  I mix 50/50 water and white glue, then mix that 50/50 with AP snow flock.

post-8809-0-36131800-1393674766_thumb.jpg

 

Disperse snow!

post-8809-0-74630000-1393674775_thumb.jpg

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Final base with mini: 

post-8809-0-68345300-1393675026_thumb.jpgpost-8809-0-41432600-1393675032_thumb.jpg

 

Not my best, but does the job, tells the right sort of story, and looks a heck of a lot nicer than the built in broccoli he came with!

 

Edit: Clearly I need to do something about my lighting.. I'll repost these when I have time to take better pics.

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