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Kharsin
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Okay! So I've primed a few figures and I'm ready to go. The problem is, I notice that on one of my figure's very delicately muscled arm, there's a flashing problem: her bicep is bifurcated! I'd prepped this one earlier before priming, but like everything else, you notice the flaws better after priming. The problem is that I'm finding it impossible to use a file, hobby knife, whatev to clean up her lines. If I use the file, it won't fit into the area I need to get to, and actually starts to wear away on a spot away from where I'm trying to reduce the flashing. The same problem happens with the hobby knife, and I'm worried I'll give her a flat bicep. 

 

So... with that said, to what degree do you clean up casting flaws like this that go slightly beyond ordinary flashing? Do you rub greenstuff on the area and try to even out the miscast area and smooth as best as possible? Do you file away until one arm is skinnier than the other? Do you just leave it be and pray that nobody notices?

 

What are the best techniques for getting rid or covering up flashing/miscasts/etc? For reference, this is the model I'm working on: http://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore/blade%20sister/sku-down/14645

It's on her right bicep and I'm probably being overly obsessive about it, but I want to get better at my prepping. 

 

I should also note that there are a few occlusions in this model as well. Nothing too serious, but there is a distinct divot on one of her boots and a couple in her hair. They're small, but they're there. I guess I'm just OCD over this stuff, or Varaug was just a very good cast. 

 

Thanks for the advice!

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Green stuff is the best solution for a really messed up mold alignment. Personally, if its really bad I would try to get another one, I hate having to correct errors in casting. Flash and mold lines are fine, even mild misalignment but if its a serious problem I don't want to spend my valuable hobby time fixing it.

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It is hard to beat a Dremel with diamond points. It allows for spot cleaning that you cannot reach with a file.  After that, a little GS can help.  Make certain you round the edge being smoothed before applying the GS.  If you apply the gs to a sharp edge, it will be very hard to smooth it out and the GS will have a tendency to bubble up just before the edge.  See my illustration below:

 

post-140-0-54361300-1392817089.jpg

 

Andy

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Green stuff is the best solution for a really messed up mold alignment. Personally, if its really bad I would try to get another one, I hate having to correct errors in casting. Flash and mold lines are fine, even mild misalignment but if its a serious problem I don't want to spend my valuable hobby time fixing it.

 

I would probably classify this as a mild misalignment. It wouldn't be that bad if her arms weren't so small!

 

It is hard to beat a Dremel with diamond points. It allows for spot cleaning that you cannot reach with a file.  After that, a little GS can help.  Make certain you round the edge being smoothed before applying the GS.  If you apply the gs to a sharp edge, it will be very hard to smooth it out and the GS will have a tendency to bubble up just before the edge.  See my illustration below:

 

attachicon.gifGS Prop.jpg

 

Andy

 

I may have to invest in  a Dremel. I've been wanting one for a while anyways. That's the main problem with the needle files. Sometimes you just can't get the correct angle you need!

 

Thanks for the tips!

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There are a lot of little problems that can be fixed with the use of Reaper's brush-on sealer (or similar product). You can often fill in small divots, smooth rough surfaces, and even out minor mould lines. It can take multiple applications, but it's usually not very bothersome to do. 

 

For the Dremel, I will say that you might want to practice on a few figures you don't care too much about before using it on an important project, as it is very easy to have it slip and hit an area you didn't intend. (I have even once damaged a model by inadvertently touching the shaft of the Dremel against a part of the figure while using the tool tip correctly on another part.)

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In addition to Wren's suggestion of using brush-on sealer, you could use some brush-on gloss varnish.  Or, you can take some milluput and thin it with water, and then brush that on (use a really old, crappy brush for this).

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There are a lot of little problems that can be fixed with the use of Reaper's brush-on sealer (or similar product). You can often fill in small divots, smooth rough surfaces, and even out minor mould lines. It can take multiple applications, but it's usually not very bothersome to do. 

 

For the Dremel, I will say that you might want to practice on a few figures you don't care too much about before using it on an important project, as it is very easy to have it slip and hit an area you didn't intend. (I have even once damaged a model by inadvertently touching the shaft of the Dremel against a part of the figure while using the tool tip correctly on another part.)

 

I have some but haven't messed with it yet. I've been using Krylon spray sealers. Should I use a crummy old brush or does it wash out with standard brush care? This sounds like it would work well in this application...

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Seems to have worked pretty well! Of course I noticed quite a few other areas that needed similar attention! This was either a bad cast or I'm just really lousy at prep! Lol!

 

It's shower time. I'll reprime and post in my WIP afterwards...

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I did forget to mention one thing about the sealer for the benefit of others who might read this thread - as it's transparent, you might not see a difference. Once you paint a coat of primer or base coat over it, then you can see if you've got it smooth or need to add a bit more sealer.

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I've gotten into the habit of either adding some paint (or primer) to the MSP sealer (or other medium) or painting a layer of paint between layers of medium so I can see if it is working or not.  I often use Liquitex or Vallejo matte medium, too. 

 

Another thing I watch out for is applying mediums that are too thick.  Full strength mediums can leave behind obvious edges when they dry.  If the stuff I'm using is on the thick side and I'm trying to use fewer layers, I try to remember to feather out the edges.  Adding some paint to the medium makes it easier to see the edges.  If I don't feather it, I may have to go back and repair the repair.

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