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Hello all! Here's a quick question and something I'm currently curious about as I have yet to start my next project. What are some books you can recommend on color theory, acrylics, and art in general? I'd like to learn more about what makes things (especially minis) look good.

 

Also, what books specifically on miniatures have helped you develop your skill and technique? 

 

Finally, what magazines pertaining to miniatures and/or art have you found helpful? 

 

I know these are general questions, but I'm just curious what things everyone is reading!

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I was lucky in that right after the first Bones Kickstarter, I was able to pick up all 5 Learn to Paint Kits from various sources. They were a great place to start for someone who knew nothing except that I had about 300 plain white plastic minis inbound. Those are a great deal, with 10-11 paint colors, two metal minis, a couple of taklon brushes and instructions explaining how to paint the included minis. About $25 for more than $50 worth of supplies.Each kit has a theme for the skills that are covered. The first two are great for newcomers while 5 and 3 cover colored metallic and non-metallic metals respectively. I can't recommend the kits strongly enough for people starting out. Hopefully Reaper will have these back in production soon.

 

Most everything else I've learned has been from lurking on the Reaper boards for interesting info and techniques. When I find an interesting technique here, I search the forum on it, then turn to Google if I want even more information. You'll find a lot of other interesting blogs this way. So far, Reaper seems to have the friendliest group around.

 

As for color theory, I like these three articles from The Back 40K. 

one

two

three

These are great, but I'm still planning on attending Anne's Color Theory seminar at Reapercon this year.

 

I can't really recommend any art books myself, but I'm sure there are folks here who can point you in the right direction.

 

EDIT: Here's a thread that discusses art books for mini painters

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If you are interested in mixing your own colors, Blue and Yellow Don't Make Green by Michael Wilcox is a very good place to start.

 

I have a thread on unexpected color mixes here: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/49999-color-mixes-to-make-your-head-explode-or-green-red-purple/

 

Beyond that, feel free to ask specific questions here. This forum is chock full of advice and experienced painters, and if it is sometimes difficult to search, the humans and goblins in the place can point you in a lot of useful directions.

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I second the Wilcox book, it taught me how to see color a lot better. James Gurney's Color and Light helped me start to understand how light dictates color, I don't think I've been able to apply a single page of it but it's a great read if you're into that kind of thing (and I was lucky enough to talk to the amazing Mr. Gurney one afternoon..his blog is also inspirational).

 

I'm a huge fan of Reapers learning kits and they leveled up my painting quite a bit, but they don't really do any color theory stuff. It's mostly paint by numbers.

 

Since Thrym got me into facebook I've begun following a bunch of artists and collectors on there. A few of them like to deconstruct their work or show WIPs, it's mostly 2D painting but a few like the Brush Brothers do minis.

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I've done all the LTPK except for 3, or whichever one is the NMM. I've got those figures primed, but figured (heh) that I'd wait until I got a few more minis under my belt before tackling that. 

 

I'm definitely going to have to check out a few of those books! I tend to get into a hobby then try to learn everything about it. It's how my brain works, so I start straying off to color theory and other related things.

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I'm sorry to hear that. I'm kind of surprised his publisher let it go out of print.

 

I just checked my studio and it looks like I never bothered to buy a copy (although I do have his book rating different brands of watercolors).

 

It's okay. His book is mostly for beginners and those lost in the intricacies of color mixing. I think I didn't get it when I ran across it because I knew all that stuff already.

 

BTW: Fun trivia: Sir Isaac Newton divided the spectrum into seven colors, two of which are a bit dubious. Indigo seems a barely necessary fine distinction between violet and blue, and orange was at the time barely considered a separate color, more a shade of either red or yellow (William of Orange made orange as a separately understood color fashionable). They don't really fit; they seem almost crowbarred in to the standard understanding (still seen in many children's toys) of the basic colors of the rainbow as violet, blue, green, yellow, and red.

 

That's because they are.

 

There is a very weird reason for this.

 

It's because Sir Isaac Newton was an alchemist and occultist as well as a scientist, something which has largely been forgotten or glossed over in the history of the development of science.

 

He was a sorcerer and gave the spectrum seven colors because seven was a magic number. That's all.

 

He needed to fit two extra colors in between normal colors of the rainbow to get seven mystic colors. I guess orange and indigo seemed reasonable new colors, since the alternatives would have been turquoise and chartreuse.

 

So thanks to alchemy and occult superstition, we have ROY G BIV instead of RYGBV.

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I think they may be just selling in-house: http://www.schoolofcolor.com/acatalog/Blue_and_Yellow.html

 

Oooh, good find!  Does look like it is still there.

 

And it may be beginner stuff, but that is me when it comes to color theory!  I've never had any art classes of any sort (my art always having been music).  I'd like to attend Anne's class at Reaper Con.  But I think it both cases I am in another class at the same time and won't be able to.

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I think they may be just selling in-house: http://www.schoolofcolor.com/acatalog/Blue_and_Yellow.html

 

 

Oooh, good find!  Does look like it is still there.

 

And it may be beginner stuff, but that is me when it comes to color theory!  I've never had any art classes of any sort (my art always having been music).  I'd like to attend Anne's class at Reaper Con.  But I think it both cases I am in another class at the same time and won't be able to.

I said it awkwardly. I should have emphasized, for beginners it's brilliant. It really gives a boost over the ol' learning curve.

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I think they may be just selling in-house: http://www.schoolofcolor.com/acatalog/Blue_and_Yellow.html

 

Oooh, good find!  Does look like it is still there.

 

And it may be beginner stuff, but that is me when it comes to color theory!  I've never had any art classes of any sort (my art always having been music).  I'd like to attend Anne's class at Reaper Con.  But I think it both cases I am in another class at the same time and won't be able to.

I said it awkwardly. I should have emphasized, for beginners it's brilliant. It really gives a boost over the ol' learning curve.

 

 

No apology necessary.  I know what you meant!

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