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Grumpy Horse Anatomy Thread

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I honestly don't remember if I've requested this before, so...I'll say it (possibly again):

 

I would like a Grim Reaper / Angel of Death.

 

In Bones.

 

I find it exceedingly peculiar that Reaper does not, in fact, have any reapers in Bones. There's Mr. Bones, sure, but they have him with a shovel instead of a scythe. I was expecting at least one to show up in KS2, but to my everlasting puzzlement, one did not.

 

So, at least one Reaper, please, Reaper!  ^_^

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

 

I'm thinking the Reaper Reapers.

02001, 02002, 02003, 0200402019, and 02020.

I'd prefer these Reapers to be made into Bones first:

War

Death

Famine

Plague

I vastly prefer the older Reapers (02001, 02002, 02003, and 02004 - I want the cavalry version more than the infantry version.)

 

*EDIT* Better still would be the traditional Horsemen -

 

72_four-horsemen-of-the-apocolypse.jpg?w

 

The Auld Grump

  

 

Wow, that's a great picture Grump! So rare to see the 1st horseman portrayed as the Conqueror.

 

I second the call for traditional horsemen: The Conqueror, War, Famine/Pestilence, and Death.

 

One of Dore's illustrations - he is kind of my default for Biblical themes. (Well, him and Hieronymus Bosch - Garden of Earthly Delights is just so danged strange...)

 

Of course then there are the Five Horsemen - War, Pestilence, Famine, Death, and Ronald Soak.

 

We_Ride_by_AndrewSalt.jpg

 

The Auld Grump, Ronnie is also known as Kaos....

 

*EDIT* Added illo.

  

I'll just leave this here....

 

weird-al-yankovic-alpocalypse.jpg

I notice Weird Al's horse has a mane as permed as his hair.

 

It's probably the least relevant part of it, but I find myself looking at the horses.

 

The horses on the Weird Al poster are ok, a little rounded, but their neck anatomy is weird, especially where the necks join the bodies. The face of the one on the right is off, and its hooves are inelegant.

 

The Doré horses are considerably better but suffer from the nineteenth century habit of not quite knowing how horses actually moved. For dramatic effect the poses are ok, but like Conan with his arms dislocated back to swing a sword, they're not lifelike.

 

The horses in the discworld art lack an understanding of anatomy. Those legs especially bother me.

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I have a "How to Draw Horses" book that I picked up a long time ago in a university bookstore.  It was sealed in shrinkwrap.  This was way back in my scribbling phase.

 

I was rather pleased to find this book, since drawing horses is difficult.

 

Said book's instruction can be summed up as follows:

 

1.  Find Horse.

 

2.  Draw Horse.

 

And that was pretty much it, except for a bunch of illustrations featuring horses which were found and drawn.  This was neither instructive nor helpful.   There was a distinct lack of instruction on how to transform said found horse into drawn paper horse. 

 

Having not learned my lesson, I bought a book in the same series about buildings.  As you smarter hoomans may have already guessed, the instruction in this book was:  Find Building; Draw Building. 

 

:mellow:

 

 

 

 

I still feel cheated, nearly 20 years later. 

Edited by buglips*the*goblin
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Horses can be a problem for artists, especially miniature sculptors - we tend to spend so much time working with human forms, that visualising other types of animal is difficult. But it still just comes back to observation, really. Buglips, that book was pretty much right - 'find horse, draw (sculpt) horse' is how it works. The hard part is training yourself to really observe and understand the object you're looking at.  But yeah, I'd still have felt cheated! :;):

 

 

 

I've had to do quite a few different types of horse sculpting over the years - there's a few pics here, if anyone's interested... http://michaellovejoy.com/animals/animals.html

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Any good drawing instruction book will teach you about anatomy. NeonDragon's dragon-drawing books give you a good idea of how to make up fantasy anatomy using actual anatomy. Knowing the skeletal and muscular structure of a creature is very helpful in making it look real.

 

ETA: When will we be getting Shetland pony minis Lovejoy? They're so cute! :wub:

Edited by redambrosia
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Dover has a reprint of a horse anatomy book, possibly by George Stubbs, the legendary horse portraitist.

 

For anyone who wishes to learn to draw horses -- or any other kind of animal -- I recommend starting with the skeleton. Copy it out of the book, and if you're lucky enough to live near a museum with a horse skeleton (or, in my case, a fossil zebra, close enough), go draw that too. It helps you see the details of how the bones connect.

 

Then copy out the muscle anatomy. The thing about this is that the act of drawing is itself a memory aid, so by drawing the stuff you will remember it far better than just by looking at it.

 

When you are comfortable enough with your understanding of horse anatomy, go look at and draw real horses.

 

Ideally this would be real-life, alive in person horses, assuming you have access to some and the owners are okay with you hanging around with a drawing pad.

 

Zebras and donkeys in the zoo are good subjects, too. Try to draw them while they are moving, if you can.

 

You can also draw horses from TV, which helps with capturing how they move. If you are really interested in the mechanics of how they move, Dover has also reprinted Eadweard Muybridges groundbreaking photographic studies of horse movement.

 

If you don't have access to live horses, you can work from photographs. Horsey magazines and calendars tend to have obsessively sharp, clear, focused pictures of horses which rather emphasize their musculature.

 

The last thing you want to do is copy other people's horse artwork. Most everybody gets at least something wrong, and if you aren't already solidly grounded in an understanding of horse anatomy you won't know what it is and chances are you'll get more wrong on top of it.

 

That said, I have found Breyer horse models to be useful 3-D references.

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ETA: When will we be getting Shetland pony minis Lovejoy? They're so cute! :wub:

Ah that brings back bad memories...Shetland Ponies, the worst animal to get a kid to learn to ride on. I had two and they were both very inteligent and evil creatures in a cute package. I do not think we ever went on a ride without getting thrown or knocked off by finding a fallen tree to go under.

 

Made me decide that if i wanted to be a cowboy it would have to modern on the back of a motorcycle. It took me about thirty years before i could enjoy riding animals...ironically when my dad bought several teams of giant draft mules. These beasts were more intelligent than any horse i have ran across and much gentler temperment...a joy to ride or drive if harnessed.

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Dover books are awesome. I could buy their whole library and not have enough. :wub:

 

And I've had enough experience with shetland ponies to know their evil. I was hoping I could paint them up to bedevil some of our characters.

 

Plus they're cute ^_^

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The title of this thread prompted me to wonder: is the anatomy of a grumpy horse any different to that of a happy horse?

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I have a "How to Draw Horses" book that I picked up a long time ago in a university bookstore.  It was sealed in shrinkwrap.  This was way back in my scribbling phase.

 

I was rather pleased to find this book, since drawing horses is difficult.

 

Said book's instruction can be summed up as follows:

 

1.  Find Horse.

 

2.  Draw Horse.

 

And that was pretty much it, except for a bunch of illustrations featuring horses which were found and drawn.  This was neither instructive nor helpful.   There was a distinct lack of instruction on how to transform said found horse into drawn paper horse. 

 

I agree that good people-drawing books are much easier to find. You can get photo references with the same person shot from 24 or 32 different angles in the same pose, you can get books with guidelines for proportions, and failing all else, you can get a friend to pose and take a photo from the correct angle.

 

Not so much with animals.

 

"All right, I need your best noble horse pose ... neck arched a bit more ... turn a bit more toward me ... then raise your right forehoof.  Perfect."  ^_^

 

(I do like this book for horse color details.)

 

The Muybridge photos (not just horses) are nice, but they're all shot from directly to the side, so it's difficult to use them for other angles. And otherwise, you're sort of stuck flipping through page after page of animal pictures until you find something that's kind of close to the angle and pose you want, then modifying it to the best of your ability.

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Personally, I prefer sculpting animals to people, but that is mostly because I spent a lot of time studying and drawing animals throughout my life while hating to draw people.

 

Arkive is my go to spot for wild animal reference photos.

 

For livestock, I use Breeds of Livestock.

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The title of this thread prompted me to wonder: is the anatomy of a grumpy horse any different to that of a happy horse?

Highly developed frowning muscles.

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Personally, I prefer sculpting animals to people, but that is mostly because I spent a lot of time studying and drawing animals throughout my life while hating to draw people.

 

Arkive is my go to spot for wild animal reference photos.

 

For livestock, I use Breeds of Livestock.

 

Arkive looks really interesting. And I use the OSU site as well, but the horse colors book discusses how genetics affects horse colors in a way that I haven't seen collected together as conveniently elsewhere. The wikipedia articles on horse colors are also very good, especially for rare colors.

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and if you want horse pictures. let me know. I will go out and take a few. Considering my horses they will probably all be asleep, but oh well.

 

Shetlands are actually very good horses, if they are raised properly, but they are quite smart, and if they are not brought up to be gentle, they can be right jerks. Donkeys and mules can be much the same. Yet if they are raised up properly, with a lot of time spent with them from the time they are foals, they can be like great big dogs. Extremely loyal, very friendly, and often eager to please. Some of them though get a wicked sense of humor. Our old horse is that way. He learned to untie himself, and if he can't untie himself, he will untie any other horse within reach. I've seen him wipe my dad off on a branch, then stop turn and 'laugh' at him.

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My f-i-l's wife raises miniature donkeys. They are friendly and curious. When I was in their pasture taking pictures it was hard for me to get far enough away from them to get long shots. And one kept close by my side the whole time, maneuvering for ear scritches.

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