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jdizzy001

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Is anyone following this? I read on wotc's website it is supposed to be released in summer 2014. I just finished reading the Beta module and I am pleased to see some of the changes they are considering, such as the proficiency bonus and the advantage/disadvantage mechanic. Just one more place to use my reaper minis ;)

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The game group that I play with has been using the play test since the end of summer. Having only played 4th Edition and Next, I prefer Next.

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We've been playing since last summer. I like it, but the playtest version is still kind of light on rules and vague in places.  I heard at the FLGS today that the release date is Aug 15.... GenCon. 

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I've played DnD since basic.  I really took a shine to 3 and 3.5.  I didn't like 4, but did like Pathfinder.  I played a demo of 5 at Origins last year.  It had some interesting ideas, but I still like Pathfinder better.  If I were to characterize it as any particular flavor of DnD, to me it felt most like basic.

 

I'll probably look at the books when they come out.  I hope to make my saves and not buy them though.

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I've played DnD since basic.  I really took a shine to 3 and 3.5.  I didn't like 4, but did like Pathfinder.  I played a demo of 5 at Origins last year.  It had some interesting ideas, but I still like Pathfinder better.  If I were to characterize it as any particular flavor of DnD, to me it felt most like basic.

 

I'll probably look at the books when they come out.  I hope to make my saves and not buy them though.

Yeah, that about sums up my feelings about 5e as well.

 

I don't hate it in the same fashion that I loathe 4e - but I like Pathfinder better.

 

On the other hand... WotC didn't fumble their Profession [Marketing] roll this time. (A big hint - insulting your old player base is not an effective way to get them to use your new system when they still like the older one.)

 

 

So, I am waiting on seeing what the license is like.

 

If the license is substantially similar to that of 3.X then I may give it a look.

 

If there is no license, or if the license more closely resembles the (horrible, horrible, horrible) GSL than the (infinitely better) OGL... then (literally) no dice. :P

 

The Auld Grump

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I heard wotc took a huge financial hit with the 3.5 ogl. That is why they reworked the 4e ogl. What? You've never heard of the 4e ogl? That is because it wasn't nearly as friendly as the 3e ogl. Basically the 4e ogl said, you can use terminology but not mechanics.

 

What is 5e like? Have you ever played castles and crusades? First off, I highly recommend that game. Rules light and fun! 5e is basically a rules heavy version of castles and crusades. There are some fantastic mechanics to 5e. My personal favorites are proficiency, bounded accuracy (which isn't a mechanic so much as a philosophy) and the magic weapons. Instead of awarding massive static bonuses, magic weapons award smaller bonuses +1 to +3 and focus on special powers instead. Unbreakable, extra damage, awards extra spells, neat tid bits like that. They also include tables for really making unique weapons. For example instead of finding a +6 sword of killing every thing, you find a +1 unbreakable elven longsword. I know older editions included and encouraged flavor like that but 5e included tables to help generate such items.

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I ran a couple of the playtests for 5. My group consensus seems to mirror most of the other opinions here. Less complex than 3rd/pathfinder, more like old school d&d than 3rd or 4th. The advantage/disadvantage seems like a fun mechanic, though it might run into confusion when several opposing conditions apply. Everyone said they'd be willing to play in the system when it came out.

 

The playtest packets varied WILDLY though, so I'm really curious what they end up with.

 

For instance, they came out with a magic system at one point that I thought was absolutely fantastic, with basically a different system for each class, whether sorceror (spell points, minor shapechanging benefits like dragon claws as spell points are used), wizard (memorize and cast as in 1st thru 3rd editions), cleric (memorize and cast, but with some flexibility, [ex. memorize 2 1st level spells, can cast each once, or either twice], turn undead is a spell) or warlock (unlimited use of invocations). It didn't seem too complex to me, a player only had to understand how his class worked, but it was met with an outcry from playtesters and quickly vanished. It's a shame though, it was the most flavorful thing I saw in the playtest packets and really set the various casters apart.

 

The melee classes went up and down dramatically in power with the various releases. They did come up with some creative ways to make melees do more than swing and hit though, and made some dramatic changes to how feats and skills are gained and used, so I am looking forward to seeing the initial releases to see what made the cut.

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I don't like 4E, 3E, 3.5E, or Pathfinder.  5E goes back to 1E and 2E in feel, and I will buy them on release, and never look back.

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I just started playing Pathfinder about three weeks ago. I'm having fun with the group, but it's not filling the 2nd Ed AD&D nostalgia shaped hole in my heart. Maybe Next will be enough of a call back to to do so?

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I'm not sure if you can still DL the playtest from the Wizards website. It was free, no NDL.  As others have said, it's a lot like earlier editions, very slimmed down. There's a couple of packages per class, but not a billion customizing options like 3.5.  There's a handful of feats and skills. The spells lists have really been trimmed down and some of the effects changed.  Combat has been simplified, there's no dancing around not a lot of modifiers to go through to calculate your roll. 

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I've played DnD since basic.  I really took a shine to 3 and 3.5.  I didn't like 4, but did like Pathfinder.  I played a demo of 5 at Origins last year.  It had some interesting ideas, but I still like Pathfinder better.  If I were to characterize it as any particular flavor of DnD, to me it felt most like basic.

 

I'll probably look at the books when they come out.  I hope to make my saves and not buy them though.

 

Yeah, that about sums up my feelings about 5e as well.

 

I don't hate it in the same fashion that I loathe 4e - but I like Pathfinder better.

 

On the other hand... WotC didn't fumble their Profession [Marketing] roll this time. (A big hint - insulting your old player base is not an effective way to get them to use your new system when they still like the older one.)

Now I'm curious (as I tend to be oblivious to ad campaigns and missed most of this). Can you point to some examples?

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I heard wotc took a huge financial hit with the 3.5 ogl. That is why they reworked the 4e ogl. What? You've never heard of the 4e ogl? That is because it wasn't nearly as friendly as the 3e ogl. Basically the 4e ogl said, you can use terminology but not mechanics.

 

If you heard that, I would dispute the accuracy of your source. Unless, of course, you (or the source) think(s) that someone else making money on the OGL means that money was lost by WotC/Hasbro.

 

At the end of AD&D 2E, WotC had lost a great deal of market share to, well, nearly everyone. The OGL meant that nearly everyone was using some version of the OGL rules, which meant that WotC had regained both mind and market share.

 

It was a disaster for any rules system that wasn't OGL (hence the d20 versions of so many different systems), but it was a huge win for WotC.

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It was quite a while ago, but if memory serves, wotc released the article regarding the losses the incurred due to the 3e ogl. Losses meaning other folks were making money off their system. I know I never bought 3e cause it was available for free via the ogl.

 

Yes, the current iteration of 5e docs are very "old school" but one can tell they are applying lessons learned. For one thing they have distanced themselves from all things 4e (as noted by their refusal to use the word "bloodied" to reference creatures with a current HP = to half their max HP). Okay there are some elements they kept, heal surges covertly disguised as hit dice (kudos wotc, I like this redress), at will spells (yeah! Wizards are no longer second rate archers), and spells that can recharge, a la encounter powers.

 

If you ask me, 5e has a lot of potential, however, if 5e doesn't scratch your old school itch I garauntee you that castles and crusades (by troll lord games) will!

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