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in theory a glaze is simplicity itself. I like to use a colour either a step up or a step down from my base colour. You then thin it down to the point of near transparency. For me, because my workspace is covered in cardboard, which i tend to wipe excess paint off my brushes on, i test it by going over a patch of colour to make sure that the colour shows through. others recommend using it over the writing on the back of a mini blister or something, so that you can see how transparent it is. You then just brush it on over the area where the transitions are.

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That's exactly what a glaze is, it's a very controlled thinner wash. It's really meant to blend colors for smoother transitions. Tim explained it very well and it's a really useful tool in our toolbox to use. It'll take a few coats (usually between 4-8 depending on glaze opacity) to get that blend down to where you want it.

 

So what I'd do for what you have right now is take another glaze of a mix between your highest highlight and your mid tone and glaze over the edges of both to get a smooth transition. Do it a few times until you are happy and you'll notice a huge difference after a few coats even though it is so thin. You've got the shadows and mid tone transition down really nice. Just make really sure your brush is damp and not wet with the mix and you'll be fine.

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
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Question, how much are you thinning your paints? I think that may be some of your difficulty with blending your highlights and shadows.

 

Also on the exposed leg, there are some spots that you won't want to bring to your full highlight value to help show the detail and improve the look, particulary just above the knee and just below it. However, I personally do find this to be harder to find on "pretty" female figures than the muscle-bound type of either gender, generally because female figures sculpted to be "pretty" have smoother lines.

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Honestly I have not yet thinned them as I am uncertain how far to thin them. I know how to make washes fairly well, but not how to thin paints. Most of these are Reaper MSP and I have some of the new Citadel as well. I keep hesitating due to fear of thinning to more of a wash by accident.

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Just remember that Bones don't play well with thinned paint, so if this is an unprimed bones figure you'll want to lay down an unthinned basecoat first.

 

If you're using MSPs or other dropper bottles (sorry if all this has been covered, I just jumped in on the last page), keep an eyedropper handy. Makes it real easy to put one drop of water into one drop of paint, which is usually plenty thin.

 

I'll also mention feathering...it looks like you're making lines of highlight that follow the ridges on the dress. The one that really stands out is the very long 'v' in the middle of the back of her skirt. Try making very small strokes in series, perpendicular to the ridge you're highlighting. You'll end up covering the same v-shaped area, but it will look a bit feather-like. Move the brush toward the place where you want the most color, and you'll see that the outer edges of the feather blend into the Maidstone, while more highlight pigment stays at the end of each brushstroke. This will help your blending, especially in conjunction with the glazes you're already doing.

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Just remember, when you thin, the paint will become more runny so make sure to wick excess paint off your brush (using something that doesn't have loose fibers in it) so you don't end up with it acting like a wash. The best painters out there all thin their paints and they work in multiple multiple layers of the stuff, it helps for more seamless transitions and helps with blending. So while it takes longer to do because you are applying more layers and waiting for them to dry, you end up with a much more nicely painted figure.

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The best painters out there all thin their paints and they work in multiple multiple layers of the stuff, it helps for more seamless transitions and helps with blending.

The best painters, except Wappel, who is an insidious counter-cultural madman. And even he uses glazes, so I guess all the best painters, even Wappel. Despite his seditious ways.

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