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My VERY first mini - Bones "Mr Bones" 77195


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So, I attended the "Paint and Take" panel at Norwescon 37, and painted this guy.

 

I had never painted a mini before in my life, had about half an hour to complete this, and had to share a brush, because they only had 30 brushes for closer to 70 people in the workshop. I did all the smaller detail with twisted up bits of a paper napkin. I know it pretty well sucks, compared to most of the pics here, but I think it turned out pretty well, considering my constraints and complete lack of experience with painting a figurine of any sort, let alone one this tiny.

 

mini_reaperbones_mrbones_front1.jpgmini_reaperbones_mrbones_front2.jpgmini_reaperbones_mrbones_back.jpg

 

After I looked at the photos, ESPECIALLY the detail one (below), I was able to see all the bits I messed up or missed all together. I'll be going over him again once I have a magnifying visor.

 

mini_reaperbones_mrbones_detail_sm.jpg

Link to larger version

 

 

My Mr. Bones dude is now a work in progress.

Here is that thread.

Further updates will be there, and all photos are in that OP.

Edited by Khaos WolfKat
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So, I attended the "Paint and Take" panel at Norwescon 37, and painted this guy.   I had never painted a mini before in my life, had about half an hour to complete this, and had to share a brush, b

Update!   I've done a bit more work on Mr Bones tonight, and I think he's coming along. I still need some better lighting, which is on the way, and the visor on loan to me isn't really ideal, but MUCH

Working under those circumstances I would have simply eaten the miniature and called it a day.   Taking photos of your miniatures is helpful but can also get in the way of the fun if it causes one t

Welcome to the madness of miniature painting. And that is not a bad job for your first mini. Just have fun and remember that it only needs to look good at arms length for gaming. The blown up photos of our minis tend to bring out deails most of us cannot see with the naked eye. Alhough they do help us improve ;-)

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Yes, photos are a great tool for learning and improving!

 

I love this mini, and you've done a great job starting this hobby. Don't ever paint over him, so you have a benchmark for all the minis to come.

 

I love that he was painted with napkins ; that's a great story!

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Nice job!  It looks like the biggest issue is that paint has been rubbed off.  Getting some sticky-tack to attach his base to a cup or bottle cap or whatever, so you can hold that instead of the figure while painting, will help a lot. Also, for bones, you can first do a basecoat of brown-liner or similar which seems to stick to the bonesium better and flake less. 

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Working under those circumstances I would have simply eaten the miniature and called it a day.

 

Taking photos of your miniatures is helpful but can also get in the way of the fun if it causes one to obsess too much over details you will never notice otherwise, in my opinion.

 

Keep it up!  My rule of thumb for painting is: am I enjoying myself?  That's all that matters.

 

Cheers.

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Ooook i'll start with good advices:

 

1) Prime the miniature! if you are at early stages in painting miniatures i suggest a black primer that helps A LOT for 2 reasons the paint stick on the mini easier, also if you miss a spot it looks black so you tend to not noticing it

2) coverage... don't miss spots revealing the bare miniature 

 

 

now since i'm teaching to a friend of mine how to paint i think i can help you too

 

- paint hard-to-reach parts first so you can correct when painting easier parts

- thin the paint, paint several times if needed

- washes! really unless you are going for a masterclass miniature rely on these buddies

 

 

 

Now some questions:

i don't get what's the zombie green and the black/purple scheme on the back maybe purple and black were close so you didn't notice difference untill flashed when you took the photo?

 

 

if you wanna try again i'll try to suggest a list of things to do:

 

Prime it in black

paint the bones

paint the purple robe

now the cords

the wood

then the metal part

now red in the eyes

now it's time for a good black wash (just try to not flood the eyes remember you can dry the brush and use it suck away a wash)

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Hey, that's not bad for those conditions! I'm going to have to disagree with badula's advice above, however. Don't use primer on Bones. Many spray primers (and sealers) chemically react with the plastic they're made of, and turn into a sticky mess. Even if they stay fine (or you use brush-on), they've been found to actually bond less well than straight Brown Liner, which is a much more effective basecoat, and it looks more natural to boot. Very little in the world is actually black. I also recommend against a black wash as a final step; dark brown will almost always look better and more natural, and creative colors can be even nicer. Try to use washes selectively as well; it's an easy way to kick a mini up a notch. Complimentary colors can be really nice for this: red "cloth," for example, gets a great depth of color when a dark green wash is applied in the recesses. An over-all wash is a fast and easy way to shade a whole mini at once, but it can end up just looking sort of grungy and boring. Your efforts will be better spent, in my opinion, spending a little more time on each mini and really pushing yourself to make them look good, rather than churning through them as fast as possible.

 

Ultimately though, I think paint placement is the first thing for you to work on: get the colors where you want them, and only where you want them. Having a good brush (or a brush at all) makes this so much easier, but it's no substitute for practice. Once you've got that down, all the other fancy techniques come (relatively) easily.

 

I agree with Sanael: never repaint your first mini! That way you can always look back and see just how far you've come.

 

Bonus photography tip: move the camera back. See how, in the first few pictures, the towel is in focus but the mini is blurry? That's probably because your camera is too close to the mini, and the autofocus isn't working on it. Move the camera back a little bit, make sure you're using the macro mode (it looks like a little flower), and then crop the photo afterwards.

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First off, welcome to the hobby and the forum! You will find that this place is full of friendly people who give some really excellent advice and are very encouraging. I'd say go check out some of the tutorials and just keep practicing, ask for feedback as you go through on things and try to get better with one technique at a time and you'll be putting out really good pieces in no time at all. Go check out Pixel's thread where she started out as a complete noob (her words) and is now winning awards at Cons and is one of the better painters around here. It's a long thread, but it documents a lot of great advice and shows how quickly people can improve.

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Thanks for sharing this with us. Welcome to the hobby and the forum here. You'll find it to be a very friendly and helpful group. I agree that you should hold on to this one to look back on later.

 

A decent brush of your own and the magnifier will be a great place to start. 

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Welcome aboard  ^_^  I'd have to say that that's pretty good for having to share a brush and using napkins! Aside from the what the others have suggested, I would just add: Get a good lamp. I have a true-colour LED lamp to paint under and it improves the conditions very much. All those little spots you miss become visible (the magnifying glass helps too) and you can really see the colours you're laying down.

 

Keep up the good work and enjoy yourself! Enjoying yourself is the most important thing^_^

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Welcome aboard  ^_^  I'd have to say that that's pretty good for having to share a brush and using napkins! Aside from the what the others have suggested, I would just add: Get a good lamp. I have a true-colour LED lamp to paint under and it improves the conditions very much. All those little spots you miss become visible (the magnifying glass helps too) and you can really see the colours you're laying down.

 

Keep up the good work and enjoy yourself! Enjoying yourself is the most important thing^_^

Very much this. I always use at least three lights when I paint: the overhead light (which is pretty useless), some sort of desk lamp, and one of those hikers' head-lamp things. The latter is great because it points right where I'm looking at any given moment, as opposed to the desk lamp which always comes at sort of awkwardly from the side. It's also surprisingly bright for such a little thing.

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Quick tips: 

 

Prime Black, then 'over spray' with white for killer pre-shading

 

Always paint light to dark.... never dark to light as you layer your colors

 

Practice Practice Practice

Eh, I'm going to disagree with these too. Zenithal highlighting (spraying white primer over black primer) can be a useful shortcut for army painting, but shortcuts like that are ultimately not going to help you improve your painting. And really, how hard is it to put lighter colors on the upper surfaces of the mini manually anyway? Plus, this sort of thing furthers the idea that primer=spray paint, which it's really not. If you use primer, which you shouldn't on Bones anyway, it should just be a light dusting--just enough to give the mini "tooth" that the paint can cling to. You shouldn't have a solid, opaque layer of primer, or you'll obscure the details and waste primer to boot.

 

I go dark to light (partially as a side-effect of basecoating with Brown Liner) but this is a matter of preference. I find it's easier to go in consecutively higher shades, covering progressively smaller areas with each successive highlight. Plus, this way you don't need to try to squeeze paint into dark corners, etc. It's just easier, in my opinion, to pick out the places that should be one step lighter than to try to darken your bright colors. Plus, it's much harder to get your highlights as high as they really ought to be if you start with them. Going dark to light makes lining a snap, too. (That's another thing: put a very thin line of your darkest color between any two sections of different colors. It makes each area stand out, and looks surprisingly natural; after all, there really is a thin line of dark shadow between most touching objects. It also helps with paint placement, since you don't have to worry about ugly overlap where you get a little skin color on the cloth or vice versa.) All that said, it really is a matter of preference. Tons of very skilled painters do it each way, so pick the one that feels most natural to you, and don't think you have to do it one way or the other. I'll also freely acknowledge that a light basecoat makes colors much more vibrant, though the converse is that a dark basecoat makes your shadows deeper.

 

Can't argue with practice though!

 

Oh, one more tip you'll hear a lot on this forum: contrast, contrast, contrast! Always push your highlights up about three steps higher and your shadows three steps darker than you think you should. When you've got all your lights, and your magnifier, and you've been staring at your mini for the past hour, you can see every subtle color variation, but as soon as you step away, it'll all disappear and flatten out. We're used to thinking of things as solid colors, but there's a tremendous variation in shade on any given object. It's always scary, and you'll worry you're going to ruin your mini with outrageous highlights, but it'll really help a whole lot. If you're ever considering adding another highlight layer, do it. It's almost always the right choice. And then add another one after that, just to be sure.

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