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azizcansaythis

finally i got my miniature that i wanted, but...

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finally! back from my vacay i came home got my miniature, but damn, how do u even paint this?!?

 

1. the size almost 2 inches from bottom to top of the sword.

94ff6876-5fdb-483e-a542-676ff0ed0024_zps

 

2. from the outside look of it.

IMG_0083_zps600316f5.jpg

 

3. here is what im gonna do w/ the paint, if possible that is.

von_zps813d56c4.jpg

 

this is all reapers paint. any tips and advice will do, ty adv.

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brush- probably gonna get size 5/0 and size 3/0 for standard brush. 

 


 

 

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brush- probably gonna get size 5/0 and size 3/0 for standard brush. 
 

 

 

Those are really small brushes.  Think the advice is to use the biggest brush you can to paint with.  It sounds like an impossible task to paint with larger brushes when you need to do details, but you'll be surprised what you'll be able to do with practice and a good brush.  I suggest a size 1 or 2 brush at least.

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A couple of things to remember:

 

* your first mini won't look like the painted example - that painter will have had a lot of practice.

 

* practice painting and your minis will improve as you go.

 

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/51059-helping-noobs-good-karma-painting-kickstarter-bones/

this thread is a good one to see a painter improve over time with practice (lots and lots of practice)

 

Have fun

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First thing to do is prep the mini. There is very likely a mold line that will need to be removed, usually using a small set of files, but in a pinch the edge of a sharp hobby knife can be used (kind of scrapping the mold line off), The mold line is created where the two halves of the mold that the mini is cast from come together.

 

Then you will need to prime it as most paints don't adhere well to bare pewter. Reaper has a couple of brush on primers that will do the job for you, I would recommend white primer for this mini (it will be "brighter" when you are done).

 

Painting the miniature is broken into stages. I personally paint from the skin outwards. In other words I paint the skin first and work my way out like you are getting dressed. If this is your first mini then I might look for one a bit simpler to start with. This guy has a lot going on.

 

At this point I would recommend looking through the tutorials on the Reaper site which you can find here: http://www.reapermini.com/TheCraft

 

Edit: All the metal on that miniature is done with a technique called Non Metal Metal, which is painting metallic surfaces without using metallic colors. I'm not sure why its reading those edges as cloudy grey but I would actually use metallic paint either steel or gold rather than trying to duplicate NMM right off the bat. And as Kay13 pointed out, your first attempt is not going to look like the mini in the picture. Hence why I would recommend starting with something a bit simpler.

 

I also believe in the mantra of paint with the largest brush you can. And, in general, for this forum a good brush refers to a Kolinsky Sable brush. While everyone has their favorite brand, some of the brands you might look for are Davinci, Raphael, Windsor & Newton and Rosemary. My personal favorites are the Davinci Maestro series 35 (or is it 34? My brushes are about 1200 miles away right now). Kolinsky brushes are a little hard to get in the US right now. Dick Blick does have the Raphael (8404 and 8408) brushes in stock.

Edited by Heisler
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I would add advice to mount the mini temporarily on cork, a plastic disk base, medicine bottle or something similar.  Use poster tack and that should be sufficient.  You'll want to hold the mini by this temporary base, not by the mini itself.

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If you want to have good visibility to the small pieces, you'll probably want some kind of magnifier. I started with a $30 magnifier lamp from office depot. Something like this http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/420036/Realspace-Clamp-On-Magnifier-Task-Lamp/ but cheaper, or you could look at an Ottlite from Michaels.

 

For the details, having plenty of light is important. A lot of folks will recommend something with a natural light bulb as well. I use one of these with a natural light magnifier, one clamp lamp with a natural bulb and a bright CFL for the room itself while painting.

 

tldr: Magnification and more light are your friends

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To be a bit more precise than "biggest you can," the widely accepted default size is a 1 or 2 in most major brands. Note, however, that this really only works if your brush is of high quality. The reasoning is that a good brush will have a razor sharp point no matter how big it is, and the larger belly will mean it holds more paint and so won't dry out between palette and mini. I use my W&N size 1 for pretty much everything these days. (Get a couple cheap ones if you plan on drybrushing though; it'll ruin nice brushes like nothing else.) It really is easier to paint detail with a bigger brush, as long as you treat it nicely so it keeps its point. These brushes can be expensive, but they're the single most important tool in your arsenal, so why skimp?

 

As for magnification, I don't personally use any (how necessary it is depends on your age and eyesight, I suspect) but have heard cheap reading glasses as a budget solution that work well, since that's really all they do anyway. For light, I use one of those really bright LED headlamps in addition to a desk lamp.

Edited by Slendertroll
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We can meet up after reapercon (since you're in Seattle) and I can show you a trick or two. I can't paint as well as that example, but I've got a few figures under my belt and could certainly steer you in the right direction.

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Oh man, if you're in Seattle, see if you can swing by one of Card Kingdom's paint days they hold every so often. Tips and advice from veteran painters is invaluable.

 

Oh, and if you're going with the Rosemary&Co brushes (which I've seen suggested a few places, since the classic brands are hard to get in the US) go with the Series 33. I believe those are their best quality brushes for our purposes. Sizes 0-2 are likely to be the target range, but I don't have personal experience with this brand.

Edited by Slendertroll

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Since you guys are in Seattle you should sign up for classes with Meg Maples over at Arcane Paintworks.  She is a fantastic painter and her classes are supposed to be awesome.

 

I will admit to bias here.  She is a friend of a good friend of mine and I really want her to succeed at what she is doing.

Edited by Dontfear
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I'm a small-brush user, almost notorious for it in fact, but 3/0 and 5/0 are definitely too small.  0, 2/0, and a 3/0 for the tiny details would be the smallest I'd go - that's my usual set-up. 

 

Normal people, those not prone to fits of painting giant dragons with hilariously undersized brushes, would probably find size 1, 0, and 2/0 more comfortable and useful.  My particular painting preference and tool use had an unusual evolution, that's why I tend to stick with the smaller brushes - but in all likelihood everybody else will find the next category higher to be much more useful and easy. 

 

Beyond that, after some practice you'll find the small scale of miniatures isn't nearly as intimidating as it appears at first.  I was amazed at how tiny they are when I first began (more than 20 years ago now), but now I look at some miniatures and think "my god, that's a lot of cloak to paint".  Your perspective of what's big and small will change a bit over time. 

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I'm a small-brush user, almost notorious for it in fact, but 3/0 and 5/0 are definitely too small.  0, 2/0, and a 3/0 for the tiny details would be the smallest I'd go - that's my usual set-up. 

 

Huh. And here I am, thinking that a 0 is too big for anything but basecoating. I use 0, 10/0, 20/0, and 30/0 for the most part.

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I paint eyes with a 2.  A 0 is too small for just about anything but super tiny tiny things, it just doesn't hold enough paint to be useful.

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It might be worth noting that brush sizes are not standardized - they are not the same between different brands. So the 1 that one person is using might be the same size as the 0 another is using, and a 5/0 or even 10/0 synthetic is probably not that much smaller than a 3/0 Winsor & Newton Series 7. I agree that using the biggest brush you feel comfortable with is the way to go, but at the same time, I felt more comfortable with smaller brushes when I started out. Which is annoying because how do you know what brush(s) to buy starting out, but what I'm trying to say is don't feel bad or like you're doing it wrong if you don't love a larger brush right away. 

 

Looks like you've got someone local who can show you some of the tools and techniques, and that's pretty much the most helpful thing you can have to start out!

 

Good lighting to paint under can help as much as the brush in making the tiny figure seem less daunting. And if you're getting into your mid-30s or don't have great eyesight, using $5 drugstore reading glasses can help a lot, too.

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