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Hymn

The Unspoken Rules of the Reaper Forum

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Ok, folks, I've been on the Reaper forums for about a day now and it has become entirely too obvious that there is an unspoken set of ridiculous rules, jokes, and other shenanigans associated with being present here. And boy does it seem like fun. In time, I'm sure I'll discover my own laws of the Reaper forum universe, but until then how does one become streetwise here? Lay down some truth!

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Come to the Randomness thread, we'll fill break you in!

 

If I found the correct one, I just made my virgin post there. My poetic skills... aren't quite bard level yet.

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I don't know that we really have unspoken rules; the spoken ones are pretty firm, and you should find those at the top of the forum, but not so much for the implied ones.

 

The quickest rundown I could give you on the board's culture would be...

 

1. Don't lick your brushes or paint supplies.

2. There is no number greater than twenty (goblin math).

3. In the end, it is always Kaladrax.

 

Visiting the Randomness thread can be daunting, as I'm sure you've seen, but once you realize that there is no reason to catch up on all of its 600+ pages of conversation and minutiae you'll find that it's a comforting place to hang out with your fellow forumites. As I've said, we're delightful. ^_^

 

Paint... Post... Love.

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 You pay $50 to Buglips and then meet him behind the Reaper Forums swimming pool on the 4th floor in an hour...

 

 The last time I tried to explain anything to someone, they stared bleeding from the eyes and then fell down twitching. Apparently, human brains tend to break when trying to process non-linear logic.

Edited by Mad Jack
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I don't know that we really have unspoken rules; the spoken ones are pretty firm, and you should find those at the top of the forum, but not so much for the implied ones.

 

The quickest rundown I could give you on the board's culture would be...

 

1. Don't lick your brushes or paint supplies.

2. There is no number greater than twenty (goblin math).

3. In the end, it is always Kaladrax.

 

Visiting the Randomness thread can be daunting, as I'm sure you've seen, but once you realize that there is no reason to catch up on all of its 600+ pages of conversation and minutiae you'll find that it's a comforting place to hang out with your fellow forumites. As I've said, we're delightful. ^_^

 

Paint... Post... Love.

 

Yep!

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
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Buglips is Yoda. The wise old riddling muppet Yoda of the swamp, not the dumb impetuous animated wall-bouncing young Yoda.

 

He seriously knows his stuff, is cheerful about his tabletop painting skills, and is willing to reconsider anything he knows in order to further and assist the painting hobby.

 

I come in from a professional painting and sometimes teaching background, with a minor in nosy reading of chemistry manuals. I know too much to let anyone lick their paintbrushes. But I'm not a god of it or anything.

 

This place is unusually welcoming to persons of all genders, political persuasions, and levels of skill, I've noticed. We like it that way.

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I know too much to let anyone lick their paintbrushes. But I'm not a god of it or anything...

When you reach 1000 posts on the forum, you can PM the administrator, Kit, to change your title to whatever you like - the default is "Godlike."

 

Long story short, we've been encouraging Pingo to adjust her godlike title to something like "patron of do not lick the art supplies." ^_^

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LK and I have decided to call each other by new nicknames since he said we were like fuel+spark when we start going in in the Randomness thread (it will get crazy with how many posts we start tossing back and forth). So he's Sparky and I'm Gassy.

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If you like arguing with people on the internet, PM Kit and ask to be let into the Beekeepers forum, where all the arguments about non-minis related things (politics, religion, and the like) go. It's called Beekeepers, though, because if you keep bees, you're going to get stung. Otherwise, keep your real-world biases out of everyone's fun-time painting discussions.

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If you like arguing with people on the internet, PM Kit and ask to be let into the Beekeepers forum, where all the arguments about non-minis related things (politics, religion, and the like) go. It's called Beekeepers, though, because if you keep bees, you're going to get stung. Otherwise, keep your real-world biases out of everyone's fun-time painting discussions.

 

I thought you have to have X amount of posts before you can get into Beekeepers, for some reason 100 sticks in my head? 

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