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Classes You Wished For That Weren't


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1. I heard glowing reviews of Bob Ridolfi's basing class from this year, and I'd like to take it next year.

2. "Painting fabric textures" would be very useful. (I suppose this would be a more specific version of "faux textures".)

3. I would love to see a a tool making class from Julie Guthrie.

 

Painting Mechanicals or Vehicles

Hands on. Might be an opportunity to showcase Bonesium CAV models if available by next year. Participants encouraged to bring their own, rovots, androids, steampunky clunky things, robots, and unpainted metal CAVs as well as brushes.

 

4. How to paint Mechanical / Flat surfaces - subjects that are all flat planes and angles (like vehicles) are hard to shade nicely. A class on this would be cool.

 

Like Fanguad, I like to sign up for classes taught by instructors I haven't had before. I'm happy to repeat occasional classes to get a new artist's perspective.

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There are already some great ideas mentioned - faux textures, strategies for competitions and Hirst Arts techniques.

 

The only other class which might be need would be a speed painting class.  I also wouldn't mind more very specific sculpting classes focusing on techniques for creating hair, fur, or clothing. 

 

I'm sure that whatever is offered, I'll find too many classes I want to take for my little time in Texas each year.

 

 

I second the class on speed painting or themed/consistent army painting and basing.

There was an army painting class this year by Aaron.  I got some good tips out of it, but as I was the only student it sort of morphed into an airbrushing demo.  Still it was good and I learned quite a bit about time saving techniques.

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I don't know that we'll be able to do the Painting for competition thing as a panel. Think about it...I could ask those three people to teach three separate and entirely different subjects at different times, OR I could ask them to talk about one thing all together in only one time slot.

 

I will consider the panel idea, but we already ask everyone to do so much. Please understand that I am very focused on taking care of our VIP's. The one thing I never want to hear from our artists is, "Yeah I had fun this year, but it was exhausting, I think I'll give ReaperCon a miss next year."

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I also think a panel discussion on competition level-ups would be very useful...especially if there were good examples of bronze and silver entries in addition to gold. But it's totally fair to say the artists at RCon are already doing a LOT to help attendees with their entries. Skype was touched on earlier...might it be possible to do a livestream web-based panel like this? Maybe a month before Reapercon? It could reach a bunch of people, would likely help spread the word about the con, and would (hopefully) be scheduled to make life easy for the judges/artists involved.

 

Kit, if you're reading this, please don't kill me!

 

If it were to happen as a panel at the con, I would definitely say it should focus on only one category of the Open competition, probably painters. The different categories have such disparate criteria it would be hard to discuss it all in a single time slot.

 

More likely to be a doable class option: painting ordnance for competition. This category is really tough to get a grasp on for a lot of the fantasy-oriented painters, and it's also the source of the most variable scores I've seen (between two entries over two years, so it's a small sample size). Last year, I saw a score sheet that went from the highest possible score from one judge to the lowest from another, with the third judge firmly in the middle. So a class from one of the historical/vehicle painters would be really valuable for those of us interested in breaking into a new (to us) category.

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I'd rather just have them free for feedback over how to improve my piece over a generic "paint good and stuff" panel.  Lets be honest, I think a lot of people showing up to said panel would be there just to ask them for feedback or ideas on what they want to work on themselves so why clog up the VIPs with more stuff when they're already available to spend 10-15 minutes giving you personal advice on how to up your game?  It would end up being less classes, as Anne said, or less time for them to be available for questions at their desks.

 

I also am going to push the idea here, that I brought up in another thread, that beginner and basic painting classes should be off loaded to non-vips and there should be more class space for those.  I got kind of annoyed in gencon being in classes where people had never even painted before but were more advanced topics because they wanted to take some type of painting class but all ways available was something that expected you to have some basic skills already.  Didn't happen at Rcon to me as I was in beginner sculpting classes but I'm sure it happens there as well.

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I got kind of annoyed in gencon being in classes where people had never even painted before but were more advanced topics because they wanted to take some type of painting class but all ways available was something that expected you to have some basic skills already.  Didn't happen at Rcon to me as I was in beginner sculpting classes but I'm sure it happens there as well.

It certainly happens at GenghisCon, though less since we started putting difficulty levels in the class descriptions.

 

I agree that more intro stuff is really useful, and not just "This is a paintbrush" intro stuff, but something just a bit more advanced.

 

I'd also consider those sort of Painting 102 classes for later in the con, after there's been a chance for newer painters to take Painting 101.

 

As far as a Painting for Competition panel, if there's room for, say 100 people at a discussion panel, you've served more attendees with less VIP effort than you would have with three classes in the same time period.

 

And I do think it should be a panel discussion, since different judges place emphasis on different things. I've had long and involved discussions with Lili Troy about whether quality of blending should be more important than the figure's artistic gestalt. ("The blending is rough and the paint is chalky." "But the color choices are inspired and it's easily the most striking figure." "It's a painting competition." "It's an art competition." ^_^ ) FWIW, I don't really think there is a single right answer, though I'll vigorously defend my priorities.

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I got kind of annoyed in gencon being in classes where people had never even painted before but were more advanced topics because they wanted to take some type of painting class but all ways available was something that expected you to have some basic skills already.  Didn't happen at Rcon to me as I was in beginner sculpting classes but I'm sure it happens there as well.

It certainly happens at GenghisCon, though less since we started putting difficulty levels in the class descriptions.

 

I agree that more intro stuff is really useful, and not just "This is a paintbrush" intro stuff, but something just a bit more advanced.

 

I'd also consider those sort of Painting 102 classes for later in the con, after there's been a chance for newer painters to take Painting 101.

 

 

Ya, that's a good way to do it.  Maybe require people to have their own Bones learn to paint kit and you can buy one when you register for the class(es) or pick one up on your own.  Then you've got everything for several classes if you wanted to go through all the 100 level classes.  I think these would be easy to do, and not require the VIPs, as the instructors can all just follow along with the LtP manuals and be there for instructions and help as it should be very hands on.  There a lot of people that are here on the forums that could do these classes as there's no real reason to be a gold medal winner to teach basics.

 

Another advantage of following along with the LtPs is that way everyone who takes the 101 class is, more or less, at the same level when taking the 102 class even if they weren't in the same 101 class. 

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One idea we had would be to do a long term beginners class at one of the main tables in the common room. Essentially everyone would start with the same Bones figure and you all paint it up together, following the lead of the instructor.  This class could cover several sessions worth of time or even be done as a multi-evening event. It wouldn't even necessarily need to be lead by one of the VIP artists, but maybe a good painter who just wants to help others.  In the end everyone walks away with a finished piece.

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I got kind of annoyed in gencon being in classes where people had never even painted before but were more advanced topics because they wanted to take some type of painting class but all ways available was something that expected you to have some basic skills already.  Didn't happen at Rcon to me as I was in beginner sculpting classes but I'm sure it happens there as well.

It certainly happens at GenghisCon, though less since we started putting difficulty levels in the class descriptions.

 

I agree that more intro stuff is really useful, and not just "This is a paintbrush" intro stuff, but something just a bit more advanced.

 

I'd also consider those sort of Painting 102 classes for later in the con, after there's been a chance for newer painters to take Painting 101.

 

As far as a Painting for Competition panel, if there's room for, say 100 people at a discussion panel, you've served more attendees with less VIP effort than you would have with three classes in the same time period.

 

And I do think it should be a panel discussion, since different judges place emphasis on different things. I've had long and involved discussions with Lili Troy about whether quality of blending should be more important than the figure's artistic gestalt. ("The blending is rough and the paint is chalky." "But the color choices are inspired and it's easily the most striking figure." "It's a painting competition." "It's an art competition." ^_^ ) FWIW, I don't really think there is a single right answer, though I'll vigorously defend my priorities.

 

 

It sounds a little bit like your proposing that the panel be flipped around as a "how to judge" panel, rather than "how to paint".

 

I could imagine a panel of judges using a projector to put up pictures of painted minis and judging them "live" by pointing out strong points and weak points on each one. Heck, registrants could submit samples of their work when they sign up.

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I second the class on speed painting or themed/consistent army painting and basing.

There was an army painting class this year by Aaron.  I got some good tips out of it, but as I was the only student it sort of morphed into an airbrushing demo.  Still it was good and I learned quite a bit about time saving techniques.

 

 

Yeah, it was the airbrushing aspect of this class that made me avoid it. I'm just not interested in diving into airbrushing right now. So, I was thinking something probably quite similar to this year's class, but without the airbrush component.

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It sounds a little bit like your proposing that the panel be flipped around as a "how to judge" panel, rather than "how to paint".

 

I could imagine a panel of judges using a projector to put up pictures of painted minis and judging them "live" by pointing out strong points and weak points on each one. Heck, registrants could submit samples of their work when they sign up.

 

 

I intended it mostly as a view into how judges work, so that painters could add those considerations into the mix. But the discussions I've had while judging have certainly affected the way I judge as well.

 

And those discussions tend to promote consistency in judging, which is nearly always a good thing.

 

I like the idea of live judging, though I'd probably want to use one of my pieces (painful as that would be) so that there wouldn't be uncomfortable moments for someone in the audience. (Honest critiques are hard to take, especially the first few times.)

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I got kind of annoyed in gencon being in classes where people had never even painted before but were more advanced topics because they wanted to take some type of painting class but all ways available was something that expected you to have some basic skills already. Didn't happen at Rcon to me as I was in beginner sculpting classes but I'm sure it happens there as well.

It certainly happens at GenghisCon, though less since we started putting difficulty levels in the class descriptions.

 

I agree that more intro stuff is really useful, and not just "This is a paintbrush" intro stuff, but something just a bit more advanced.

 

I'd also consider those sort of Painting 102 classes for later in the con, after there's been a chance for newer painters to take Painting 101.

 

As far as a Painting for Competition panel, if there's room for, say 100 people at a discussion panel, you've served more attendees with less VIP effort than you would have with three classes in the same time period.

 

And I do think it should be a panel discussion, since different judges place emphasis on different things. I've had long and involved discussions with Lili Troy about whether quality of blending should be more important than the figure's artistic gestalt. ("The blending is rough and the paint is chalky." "But the color choices are inspired and it's easily the most striking figure." "It's a painting competition." "It's an art competition." ^_^ ) FWIW, I don't really think there is a single right answer, though I'll vigorously defend my priorities.

It sounds a little bit like your proposing that the panel be flipped around as a "how to judge" panel, rather than "how to paint".

 

I could imagine a panel of judges using a projector to put up pictures of painted minis and judging them "live" by pointing out strong points and weak points on each one. Heck, registrants could submit samples of their work when they sign up.

How judging works" is exactly what I envisioned for the panel idea. When we enter the competition, we know we need to paint well...but what that actually means, from the quantitative view a judge has to take (to a lesser or greater extent, as per Doug's quote), is also very useful for an entrant to know.

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I got kind of annoyed in gencon being in classes where people had never even painted before but were more advanced topics because they wanted to take some type of painting class but all ways available was something that expected you to have some basic skills already. Didn't happen at Rcon to me as I was in beginner sculpting classes but I'm sure it happens there as well.

It certainly happens at GenghisCon, though less since we started putting difficulty levels in the class descriptions.

 

I agree that more intro stuff is really useful, and not just "This is a paintbrush" intro stuff, but something just a bit more advanced.

 

I'd also consider those sort of Painting 102 classes for later in the con, after there's been a chance for newer painters to take Painting 101.

 

As far as a Painting for Competition panel, if there's room for, say 100 people at a discussion panel, you've served more attendees with less VIP effort than you would have with three classes in the same time period.

 

And I do think it should be a panel discussion, since different judges place emphasis on different things. I've had long and involved discussions with Lili Troy about whether quality of blending should be more important than the figure's artistic gestalt. ("The blending is rough and the paint is chalky." "But the color choices are inspired and it's easily the most striking figure." "It's a painting competition." "It's an art competition." ^_^ ) FWIW, I don't really think there is a single right answer, though I'll vigorously defend my priorities.

It sounds a little bit like your proposing that the panel be flipped around as a "how to judge" panel, rather than "how to paint".

 

I could imagine a panel of judges using a projector to put up pictures of painted minis and judging them "live" by pointing out strong points and weak points on each one. Heck, registrants could submit samples of their work when they sign up.

How judging works" is exactly what I envisioned for the panel idea. When we enter the competition, we know we need to paint well...but what that actually means, from the quantitative view a judge has to take (to a lesser or greater extent, as per Doug's quote), is also very useful for an entrant to know.

 

 

But in reality this would be "How this current set of judges at Repercon works as every con and every judge is different".

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