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How do you tell time?


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As I get older it depends mostly on my audience; but I remember this one incident when I was a kid, where I invited a friend over and told him to show up at five to seven. He came a five. ::D:  Mind you we were kids and he was from Cali and I was from NY.

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I just give the numbers.  It's not a quarter to 1500, it's 1445. 

and when he asks, yet again what the "of" means, I remind him he has his own time keeping device and to leave me alone.  

Other acceptable answers to "What time is it?" are "Hammer Time" and "Clobberin' Time."

Time usually tells me but I guess that's a different perspective altogether.  :poke:

 

On a more serious note: I tend to be specific to the minute. While not generally necessary, I try to make a habit of giving the best answer I can to any question posed to me, even if it's just "what time is it?".

 

My mother worked in a hospital and usually left me notes in with times 24-hour notation so I learned that early on. Whether I use 24-hour or 12-hour notation depends less on what timepiece at which I'm looking and more with how I'm conveying it.

  • If i"m speaking casually I use 12-hour (and if I'm paying attention I'll round off to the nearest five minute mark).
  • If I'm speaking formally I usually use 24-hour unless I know my audience wouldn't appreciate it; either way I don't round when I'm speaking formally.
  • If I'm writing, I always use 24-hour notation in the form of 17h11 (the time at which I'm writing this).
  • On the Internet, I typically include the relevant time zone as well (so 17h11 becomes 17h11 EDT).

As far as the "of" notation, I always thought it meant "after". I took it to be an abbreviation something like this: "quarter of one" meant "quarter of the one o'clock hour".

 

Remember, don't make time angry. It will get you when you least expect it.  ::D:

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No, No, No!  Proper response is "It's Howdy Doody Time!"

 

In Ohio to means before the hour, same as till but to is used more.  Mostly I use exact time but can use the after.

 

So 12:45 would normally be quarter to but 1:15 would be one fifteen.

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I can never remember what "of" means. So when someone uses it I always have to clarify. It's very common here in New England but I've never adjusted.

 

But if it's "five of one" I just say "one". If you need to know precisely you need your own watch. :D

 

PS

and when he asks, yet again what the "of" means, I remind him he has his own time keeping device and to leave me alone.   :upside:

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Of is rarely (if ever) used in timekeeping in Southern Ontario. We tend to use a quarter to twelve for eleven forty-five, but intermix a quarter after twelve with twelve fifteen. A quarter past also gets used, but less commonly. Also, people around here often omit the hour unless you ask, making the assumption you have some idea of the time, so you'll hear, "It's a quarter after" when you make an inquiry.

 

I rarely round off more than a couple minutes since I started working in the homeless shelter. For some reason, knowing the precise time is important to many of our clients, and they will ask for clarification if you use a rounded number. Then for one particular client, he will come by the office and ask what time it is. I'll reply, "It's five fifteen" and he'll ask, "AM or PM?".

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I don't think I've heard of the 'of' variant before (or at least not in active use as I may have encountered it in passing in movies or such). It sounds to me like a mutation of 'off' so that 12.45 is 'Quarter off one'. Otherwise it just sounds wrong, as otherwise saying 'quarter of one' would imply 12.15 not 12.45 (a quarter of the whole).

 

For me it's usually one of the following options (varies by what comes out of my mouth):

 

Twelve fifteen/Quarter past twelve

 

Twelve thirty/Half past twelve

 

Twelve forty-five/Quarter to one

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Out and about or at home I will use of and til (before associated hour) and past (after the associated our).  At work I use a 24 hour clock because military.

 

Interesting note:  I got out of the Navy back in 2000 and tried shifting my watch back to a 12hr setting and it drove me nuts.  I had gotten so used to converting between the 24 and 12hr methods that anything pm was messing me up.  Stressed me out so bad I ended up shift my watch back to a 24 hour setting within a week.  I also tried to grow my hair out.  THAT only lasted until it got long enough to touch the back of my neck. <shiver>  Yep, I'm institutionalized.

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Ok, time for an odd question about time. Well, series of questions.

What do you say when responding to the question, "what time is it?"

 

 

When my husband asks and occasionally a good friend I'll say "Adventure Time"  :;):

 

But to answer your question more seriously I do use a quarter till or quarter after, but never quarter of.

Sometimes I'll say half past(random hour) as in half past noon meaning 12:30pm. And I am from Pennsylvania, but even when I lived in Michigan it was the same, I don't recall anyone being confused by me.

If you want to get an odd look, tell somebody it's noon thirty. Don't say it too often around your kid though, because he might just start thinking it's normal.

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I've never ever encountered the "X of Y" notation before, but then I'm 100% West Coast born and raised.  ^_^

 

I tend toward more specific than less when it comes to giving someone the time, even when it's an analog clock that's available rather than digital (I still find it shocking that most of the kids in my mom's elementary class have no idea how to read an analog clock before they entered her class  :blink: ). I will use "quarter/ten/five til" or "quarter/ten/five after" but neither of those for "half." Then I just tend to say the time, or rarely "half past."

 

Figuring out how to decode the 24 hour clock go muuuuch easier when I realized that if the number is greater than 12, just subtract 12:00 from it and add PM.  ^_^

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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Ok, time for an odd question about time. Well, series of questions.

What do you say when responding to the question, "what time is it?"

 

When my husband asks and occasionally a good friend I'll say "Adventure Time"  :;):

 

But to answer your question more seriously I do use a quarter till or quarter after, but never quarter of.

Sometimes I'll say half past(random hour) as in half past noon meaning 12:30pm. And I am from Pennsylvania, but even when I lived in Michigan it was the same, I don't recall anyone being confused by me.

If you want to get an odd look, tell somebody it's noon thirty. Don't say it too often around your kid though, because he might just start thinking it's normal.

 

Hey I do that too! (sometimes)  See also: Mid thirty.  Or for midnight: new day.

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