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Might have been posted but what are your tips n tricks for having fun role playing ? Maybe it's something about your favorite character maybe how you tricked the dm ? Here's afew of mine

 

- get a bag of holding, fill with weapons and give to local towns people (after saving the town) for a possible Militia on call

 

- have something weird with your character to role play, mine has a fork tongue (great voice role play, sounds like he has a lisp) & a spell scar gimp hand (frost bite) which is also fun

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Most of the time I consider it good advice to just wing it and go with it (even if it is wrong) rather than halt the game for a rulebook study session (...but note down the query and look it up carefu

RP is much easier and more fun if your character has strong, built-in desires and motivations. Why are you out adventuring? What are you hoping to get from other people?   An old DM of mine made the

If I could give only one tip to help someone have fun with rp'ing, it would be to play something completely counter intuitive to your own personality. It helps people step out of their comfort zones;

Most of the time I consider it good advice to just wing it and go with it (even if it is wrong) rather than halt the game for a rulebook study session (...but note down the query and look it up carefully later).

 

But there was this one time, the exception to that 'rule', that was worth every second.

 

Rules: old-time AD&D (before anybody started doing edition numbers)

Dungeon: The Lost Caverns of TSoggy-Janusomething (Tsogganath? Tsorjanthje? I refuse to google it.)

 

The Setup: The Lizardman Character (player alignment: Neutral GetOnWithIt) had barged into a small cave where there was a treasure pile, or chest, or something. Only to have the DM proclaim, "you are swarmed by over 100 Stirges! they were hiding up in the ceiling" Then, entirely out-of-turn the Wizard-Thief-Mage-Elf (player alignment: Chaotic Everywhere) shouts, "I'll save him! I cast Power Word Kill. It will blast those Stirges right out of the air ... how many dice do I roll?"

 

 

--- game was halted, frozen, while books were cracked open, leaves were turned ---

 

 

Finally, someone hands the DM the PHB open to the relevant page. Mumbling something about 'left column, last paragraph, first sentence.' She read for a moment, sniggered, laughed, then cackled wildly, regained some composure (but the Big Evil Grin stayed firmly in place)

 

 

--- then the game resumed when she said ---

 

 

"One Stirge falls dead, ... the rest attack..."

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If I could give only one tip to help someone have fun with rp'ing, it would be to play something completely counter intuitive to your own personality. It helps people step out of their comfort zones; especially new people who have a tendency to play "themselves" in their characters. I know I did this with my first character and quickly learned that the best part to rp'ing is that you get to be whoever you want. So, my next character was a halfling rogue that looked like Clint Eastwood (a 4 foot tall version) who chain smoked and interupted/mouthed off to the bad guys every chance he got. I'm currently the only experienced player in my D&D group so I like to think that I am trying to impart that to the other players.

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Role playing is more than funny affects or odd looking characters. Determine what motivates a character and the reasons behind a characters actions become clearer. Defining the character can be hard, but if kept in mind, it'll guide you in choosing the action rather than cold hard tactics always defining what they do.

 

How you choose to portray the roll is another topic. Accents, appearances and pet phrases are all common and not terribly hard. Just don't hog the spotlight - share it.

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With motivations what are some you've used? Rid the world of evil? I always find that by far the hardest , what's some examples?

 

Atm I'm really enjoying my eldrian warlock (4e) teleporting is super fun for role play and combat encounters

 

I also like having player characters not knowing information and the player knowing it, makes for some fun role play

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Know your character's racial/class 'quirks'.  Play them up (within reason) especially if you are not playing  human.  Different races should *feel* different to your fellow players and you can really get some wonderful moments like this.

 

For example I had an Ogier PC in a Wheel of Time RPG (great RPG rules and the setting was excellent since the DM purged all of Jordan's novel characters from it!).  Ogiers are said, while possessing great physical strength, to make better scholars than fighters.  In our first encounter with some angry Trollocs my Ogier (total skill monkey with only basic fighting abilities) scores a critical hit and the DM describes the Trollocs head caving in from the force of the blow covering him in brains and blood. 

 

I had my Ogier shriek, drop his mace and flee (for a round).  I figured he had never taken a life before and it was just too gruesome for him to deal with.  He found other ways to contribute to combat (mainly providing flanking and cover) and only drew his weapon twice more after that (sadly the game only lasted 4 sessions).

 

Race is the single most overlooked PC trait ime, even moreso than align-just-let-me-take-one-I-can't-get-screwed-over-with-ment.  95% of the time every PC acts human and any racial traits or (heaven forbid) drawbacks are ignored.  Races just become another 'power up' sooooooo often.  I noticed this trend starting to a small degree in 2E AD&D but it really took off with 3E (did anyone ever play a 1/2 Elf in 3E?)

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make a character,not just a stat sheet. Think about them, flesh them out, go beyond how they look, go into what they like and dislike, and then figure out why. Figure out details of their life. do they have a family back home? do they want to one day have a family? especialy with fighter types, try and figure out why they became a warrior, and why they are an adventurer, but that can apply to any class as well.

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Some general motivations that are workable are:

- Curiousity about the world.  Think Andrew Zimmerman or Anthony Bourdain - travel to new places, meet new people, try their foods.  Familiarity can lead to empathy and a desire to help people.

- Be a paragon.  Character comes from a clan that's known for doing bad-things.  Maybe they feel they need to somehow balance the scales as a penance.

- Amass a fortune - character was poor and sees money as a reward for something that's been denied him unfairly by "them".

- Amass a fortune - character needs to buy their dad/mom/favorite griffon out of jail/slavery/servitude.

- Kill the one armed kobald who stole the family's heirloom shiny silver piece.

 

Building a good character background builds the foundation of the character.  Who are they?  Where do they come from?  Why did they choose their profession?  What _are_ they doing crawling around this dungeon?

 

Pathfinder's Ultimate Campaign has some good random tables that can be worked through.  I think they got released to the SRD so they're on the web.

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If I could give only one tip to help someone have fun with rp'ing, it would be to play something completely counter intuitive to your own personality. It helps people step out of their comfort zones; especially new people who have a tendency to play "themselves" in their characters. I know I did this with my first character and quickly learned that the best part to rp'ing is that you get to be whoever you want. So, my next character was a halfling rogue that looked like Clint Eastwood (a 4 foot tall version) who chain smoked and interupted/mouthed off to the bad guys every chance he got. I'm currently the only experienced player in my D&D group so I like to think that I am trying to impart that to the other players.

When I did RP, my hardest to play yet favorite character was a smug, arrogant, cocky elf fighter. I am the antithesis of smug, arrogant, and cocky.

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If I could give only one tip to help someone have fun with rp'ing, it would be to play something completely counter intuitive to your own personality. It helps people step out of their comfort zones; especially new people who have a tendency to play "themselves" in their characters. I know I did this with my first character and quickly learned that the best part to rp'ing is that you get to be whoever you want. So, my next character was a halfling rogue that looked like Clint Eastwood (a 4 foot tall version) who chain smoked and interupted/mouthed off to the bad guys every chance he got. I'm currently the only experienced player in my D&D group so I like to think that I am trying to impart that to the other players.

When I did RP, my hardest to play yet favorite character was a smug, arrogant, cocky elf fighter. I am the antithesis of smug, arrogant, and cocky.

 

I would agree lol

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If I could give only one tip to help someone have fun with rp'ing, it would be to play something completely counter intuitive to your own personality. It helps people step out of their comfort zones; especially new people who have a tendency to play "themselves" in their characters. I know I did this with my first character and quickly learned that the best part to rp'ing is that you get to be whoever you want. So, my next character was a halfling rogue that looked like Clint Eastwood (a 4 foot tall version) who chain smoked and interupted/mouthed off to the bad guys every chance he got. I'm currently the only experienced player in my D&D group so I like to think that I am trying to impart that to the other players.

When I did RP, my hardest to play yet favorite character was a smug, arrogant, cocky elf fighter. I am the antithesis of smug, arrogant, and cocky.

 

But you're totally an elf . . .

 

PS

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If I could give only one tip to help someone have fun with rp'ing, it would be to play something completely counter intuitive to your own personality. It helps people step out of their comfort zones; especially new people who have a tendency to play "themselves" in their characters. I know I did this with my first character and quickly learned that the best part to rp'ing is that you get to be whoever you want. So, my next character was a halfling rogue that looked like Clint Eastwood (a 4 foot tall version) who chain smoked and interupted/mouthed off to the bad guys every chance he got. I'm currently the only experienced player in my D&D group so I like to think that I am trying to impart that to the other players.

When I did RP, my hardest to play yet favorite character was a smug, arrogant, cocky elf fighter. I am the antithesis of smug, arrogant, and cocky.

But you're totally an elf . . .

 

PS

I prefer "terrestrial Vulcan"
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