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Dungeons and Dragons (fifth edition) release

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Oh, in fourth edition, some of the classes can step into the middle of battle and do some powerful attacks. For example, the monk, level 1 and has an area burst one attack and then can throw their flurry on to one of the targets. In fifth edition, I have to wait until level 2 to hit 4 or so targets. I haven't delved deeper into the fifth edition book to see what's past level 3. On the other hand, at level 3, it's really cool that a monk can catch physical range attacks and throw those items back.

 

I just like to roll dice...the more I can target, the more dice I can roll. I had to roll 18 d20's at one point of time. *swoon*

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@Chaoswolf

The actual rules aren't that similar to 1st/2nd it's more the feel of them if that makes sense. They really dialed back the crunch and put an emphasis on keeping the rules quick to play without lots of looking up modifiers and edge case rules. These rules feel like they encourage the DM to use their judgement more like they did in 1st and 2nd rather than trying to lay out super detailed rules for every little thing that might come up. The non-character creation, actual how to play the game rules are only 32 pages. And I feel that I could adjudicate almost any situation with that. That impressed the heck out of me.

 

The free Basic rules download includes more than enough to get a feel for it by the way. I definitely suggest you pull that down and take a look.

Edited by Erifnogard
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@Chaoswolf

The actual rules aren't that similar to 1st/2nd it's more the feel of them if that makes sense. They really dialed back the crunch and put an emphasis on keeping the rules quick to play without lots of looking up modifiers and edge case rules. These rules feel like they encourage the DM to use their judgement more like they did in 1st and 2nd rather than trying to lay out super detailed rules for every little thing that might come up. The non-character creation, actual how to play the game rules are only 32 pages. And I feel that I could adjudicate almost any situation with that. That impressed the heck out of me.

 

Very much this. I should've been more clear with what I's saying. There's no THAC0, or anything, but it's cleared out the crunch so that it runs freely in that earlier-edition sort of way. Players can get inventive, DM sorts it out at his/her discretion.

 

I like the 3.5 level crunch as well, but the simplicity is really nice. Depending on preferences and who you're playing with and all.

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For any situation with more than a couple of people I like to at least have a rough sketch just so everybody is clear on positioning. Don't bother with grids or measuring though, we just use the sketch or map for clarity. Sometimes we use miniatures if they happen to be handy but again only for relative positioning.

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Do y'all use maps and minis still or more of descriptive positioning for combat?

We use both. Small corridors and rooms, we describe. For rooms that are expansive, we tried it and too many monsters confused some of the players, so the minis are still used as place holders and for location.

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 The mechanics are almost frighteningly simplified. I've been gearing up for a PF campaign, and my last D&D experience was 3.5, and it's so very, very reigned in from all that crunch. Skills are simplified, which I actually kind of like, and the combat was smooth. I just started playing in a 2e campaign--it feels like those mechanics, really. A couple of the players who historically have refused to play any edition above 2e at least appear willing to continue, so, for whatever that's worth.

 

 

 

 

I played 1st edition back when I was a kid and 5th reminds me more of those days.

 

 

 

 

 

I played 1st edition back when I was a kid and 5th reminds me more of those days.

This is how it feels to me as well. There's an awful lot of rules 'tech' in 5the from 3rd and 4th but the feel is definitely 1st and 2nd ed to me.

 

 

Everything I've quoted sounds very appealing to me. I don't have any of the new edition materials; I've been holding off until I can borrow someone's stuff and look through it.

 

Would someone mind expounding upon the similarities to 1st/2nd ed for me, please? If this harkens back to a lot of what I liked about those rule sets, I might be inclined to give this a go.

 

I'd be particularly interested in any input you might be willing to share, Marvin. The last sentence I quoted from you describes me fairly well.

 

Thanks!

 

Definately download the free rules to get a feel.  If you want to read more, let me know and I'll let you borrow my PHB for a bit.  I'm not actively using it right now.

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Wednesday night's we've not been using any maps is why I ask, just sort of note approximate feet moved and such

I spent $20 on a chessex grid (the small one) and I use it a lot. The module I run for encounters only has maps so I take full creative license with the areas I grid out. And considering how the players usually run into large mobs (for ex. 2 cultists, 6 kobolds, 2 ambush stakes), not gridding it out would be too confusing.

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Oh, in fourth edition, some of the classes can step into the middle of battle and do some powerful attacks. For example, the monk, level 1 and has an area burst one attack and then can throw their flurry on to one of the targets. In fifth edition, I have to wait until level 2 to hit 4 or so targets. I haven't delved deeper into the fifth edition book to see what's past level 3. On the other hand, at level 3, it's really cool that a monk can catch physical range attacks and throw those items back.

 

I just like to roll dice...the more I can target, the more dice I can roll. I had to roll 18 d20's at one point of time. *swoon*

The main reason you had these abilities early in 4e was the minion system. Since that is gone, so went the need for tons of aoe abilities. 5e is no longer about rolling 12 dice to figure out damage. Hell, at the higher levels you really don't roll more than 4 dice (unless you are a caster). Sorry pckt, but thems was tha days.

 

 

To add to this.....wading into battle is no longer a great idea at low levels. Even fighting 2 monsters by yourself can be deadly now. In 4e you really didn't have that "fear" like you do now. I had a player that his character likes to "talk smack" to my enemy characters. Well I had three kobolds (mind you +4 to attack, 4 damage, and 5hp creatures) run up and attack him. Since they have pact tactics, they get advantage on their attacks when they have allies within 5'. All attacked, all hit, and he was incapacitated...

Edited by Mr Melons
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Our 4e DM routinely has fights with 10, 20, 30 or more non-minion enemies. These fights can take up an entire 5 hour session. And often these enemies have the ability to spawn more or regenerate. My character often has to roll 20 attacks in a round. No one seems to like this but he keeps doing it since minions don't agree with his 2nd edition mindset.

 

I look forward to more sane battles.

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Always thought 4ed mob fights were suppose to be quick. Like wadding through & cutting them down like rows of grain?

 

Haven't decided yet but I'm leaning on running my ReaperCon Mousling/Hommlet adventure as a 5e game vs a S&W game....hmmmmmmm

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Oh, in fourth edition, some of the classes can step into the middle of battle and do some powerful attacks. For example, the monk, level 1 and has an area burst one attack and then can throw their flurry on to one of the targets. In fifth edition, I have to wait until level 2 to hit 4 or so targets. I haven't delved deeper into the fifth edition book to see what's past level 3. On the other hand, at level 3, it's really cool that a monk can catch physical range attacks and throw those items back.

 

I just like to roll dice...the more I can target, the more dice I can roll. I had to roll 18 d20's at one point of time. *swoon*

The main reason you had these abilities early in 4e was the minion system. Since that is gone, so went the need for tons of aoe abilities. 5e is no longer about rolling 12 dice to figure out damage. Hell, at the higher levels you really don't roll more than 4 dice (unless you are a caster). Sorry pckt, but thems was tha days.

 

 

To add to this.....wading into battle is no longer a great idea at low levels. Even fighting 2 monsters by yourself can be deadly now. In 4e you really didn't have that "fear" like you do now. I had a player that his character likes to "talk smack" to my enemy characters. Well I had three kobolds (mind you +4 to attack, 4 damage, and 5hp creatures) run up and attack him. Since they have pact tactics, they get advantage on their attacks when they have allies within 5'. All attacked, all hit, and he was incapacitated...

 

 

I know. :(

 

At least I'm a wizard in my main game and I can wait a few levels until he is required to cast large area spells. You can say that again about the deadliness of combat, my elven ranger was having a shootout with a goblin and he critted her for 11 damage. Went from never touched in the four hour game session to 0 hp during the last 10 minutes of it.

 

Always thought 4ed mob fights were suppose to be quick. Like wadding through & cutting them down like rows of grain?

 

Haven't decided yet but I'm leaning on running my ReaperCon Mousling/Hommlet adventure as a 5e game vs a S&W game....hmmmmmmm

That was the main problem of 4E. Heroes would die to minions and regular encounters and combat would last hours. But, when the heroes fight a single boss, the boss is dead within 1.5-2 turns.

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Always thought 4ed mob fights were suppose to be quick. Like wadding through & cutting them down like rows of grain?

 

Haven't decided yet but I'm leaning on running my ReaperCon Mousling/Hommlet adventure as a 5e game vs a S&W game....hmmmmmmm

That was the main problem of 4E. Heroes would die to minions and regular encounters and combat would last hours. But, when the heroes fight a single boss, the boss is dead within 1.5-2 turns.

 

 

In my old 4e group it was actually the opposite.  My storm sorcerer could easily kill 20-30 minions in a round or two for the party, while everyone else was on boss duty as they were more single target oriented. In our previous campaign, my bard would constantly give out temp hp and even if people would get hit they would never actually feel it so wading into mobs was never really a problem. Boss fights would easily take an hour for us as our DM was very lucky and boss powers would recharge almost every turn, so those were the only "close calls" we ever had as a group.

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