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Erifnogard

What are your favorite less successful RPGs and Wargames?

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I'm curious what your favorite failed/less successful games are.  We all have them, games that you thought were awesome but which just didn't catch on.

 

For RPG's I love:

 

Dark Ages Fae from White Wolf.  I don't care particularly for White Wolf's rules usually but I really love this book, both for its rules implementation of fae and for the setting and fluff stories.  This is still the only rpg description of fae that actually both makes sense internally, both in setting and in rules, and still has the anything goes feel of faery myths.  And while it kinda-sorta has splats like other White Wolf books, they're implemented in a way that actually works and make sense for the setting without being the straightjacket that their splats usually end up.  I re-read this book every year or so but as much as I love it dearly, I've never played it because my group would never go for it and every Changeling group I've ever known doesn't like it.

 

Supercrew by Tobias Radesäter.  This is an absolutely brilliant super hero rule set contained in a 32 page comic book.  It's very light but very well thought out mechanically.  It's intended for four color supers but could be used for just about anything as long as you don't mind not having 'leveling up' rules.  I've thought about running everything from Thundarr the Barbarian, to Avengers style games, to Dungeons and Dragons with it.  Does require a group willing to be creative in their narration of actions for the game to be fun.

 

For Wargames I love:

 

AT-43 from Rackham.  The rules for this were good and had some interesting touches but I'll admit that they had me at Gorillas in Power Armor.  I bought a truly ridiculous quantity of them and still use them for 40K.

 

Inquisitor from an imaginary GW that doesn't shoot itself in the foot.  I love the art, fluff, and concept of Inquisitor.  The actual rule-set and decision to go with a totally different scale than their other games made me grind my teeth.  This could have been a great game if they had used the exact same fluff and concept and applied something like the Necromunda rules to it.  Or just paid the guys that do In the Emperor's Name to write their rules for them. 

 

Anyway, what's yours?
 

 

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Everway. Evocative and powerful, but I could never get more than one person in my group willing to give it a shot - and apparently, given how poorly it did, I was not alone in that. :blues:

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I tried to play Twilight:2000 but between the 1st and 2nd Editions there was a massive rules change that made the editions incompatible.  I wasn't able to either get enough 1st ed or enough 2nd ed materials to cobble a full game from, so I was left with a very interesting but entirely incomprehensible game. 

 

Shame, too, because it looked like fun. 

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Beast men and gods.  "I wanna play a Minotaur! I wanna play Zeus! 

- no it was just an early 80s D&D knockoff.  We played out of zeroxed binders in the late 90s. It had spell lists with one spell per level that you could learn several lists.  It also had cyclical initiative, and you could make a second or third attack at your initiative -10 and -20. fun but i don't remember much else.

 

TMNT : teenaged mutant ninja turtles (post apaco. road hogs especially) the original random backgrounds that had a 33% chance of making everyone a ninja.  

we played so much weirdness.  A gang of mouseketeer bikers. A pigeon EMT with his stolen helicopter,  a team of 4'10" Ninja Rhinos. a time-traveling wolf in platemail and a deloreon. A Tiger master assassin "I speak 5 asian languages" I don't think I ever identified which 5.  When we started the insanity tables were next to character creation. We thought they were mandatory. 

 

13th Age?  still in infancy but I love this game, it will probably get bulldozed by 5th D&D.  In a few years I will probably end up playing a hybrid of the two. It launched near the right time but has developed so slowly, it is likely to still feel unfinished while D&D rolls out a product every month. 

Edited by Evilhalfling
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I had some great times playing TMNT.

 

As far as dead games my favorite was Mordheim.  Miniature skirmish with campaign rules?  Loss of limb and eye?  Cool cardboard terrain?  Sign me up.  Actually was talking about trying to get that started up at the FLGS with Chaoswolf.

 

My favorite non-successful games were SLURP (Somewhat Logical Uncomplicated Role Play) and it's precursor the Fiendishly Uncomplicated Combat System, my high school groups home brew systems.  The first version grew out of WHFRP but by the 5th version it could handle just about anything and had become one of the most balanced systems I have played.

Edited by Dilvish the Deliverer
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Twilight:2000

Inquisitor

Mordheim

 

Agree with all of these. Also Gamma World was an awesome concept, but it got revised to death.

Nightlife was pretty cool, too. At least I thought so.

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BESM. For when you absolutely have to punch a planet to death while playing knock off's from your favourite (or least favourite if you enjoyed parody) anime

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Ooh! Ooh! Ooh! I almost forgot about HoL! Borderlands before Borderlands came out - of course, it was pretty much unplayable as written. I mean, you need the supplement (which I don't have) to make your own characters... still, a fantastic, hilarious read.

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Inquisitor from an imaginary GW that doesn't shoot itself in the foot.  I love the art, fluff, and concept of Inquisitor.  The actual rule-set and decision to go with a totally different scale than their other games made me grind my teeth.  This could have been a great game if they had used the exact same fluff and concept and applied something like the Necromunda rules to it.  Or just paid the guys that do In the Emperor's Name to write their rules for them. 

 

Anyway, what's yours?

 

 

I spotted some guys on the internet that used GW 40K plastics conversions to play Inquisitor. They made up special characters and could use bigger maps/tables.

 

 

For a Historical Skirmish Game:

Pig Wars:

Dark Ages Warfare. When men were men and pigs were money.

__

 

1:1200 VSF Naval, Air, and Ground:

Dystopian Wars

(In my neck of the woods it is all but over with.)

__

 

28mm Fantasy Skirmish:

Warlord from Reaper Minis

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TSR's 2nd edition of Battlesytems. The followup skirmish book wasn't as good.

 

Although I have to admit I wince when looking at the painted minis in the photos throughout the book.

They weren't particularly well painted, even for that time.

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TSR's 2nd edition of Battlesytems. The followup skirmish book wasn't as good.

 

Although I have to admit I wince when looking at the painted minis in the photos throughout the book.

They weren't particularly well painted, even for that time.

 

I love the painting instructions.  Hoo boy.   Reaper's LTPK - even the very first one - was a huge leap forward.  Even the citadel paint books, even the later outrageously pricey ones, aren't so great.  I think the later ones might even be worse than the originals.  Awful glad I thumbed through the later one (it had LotR figures in it, so was newish) and saved myself the wasted cash. 

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TSR's 2nd edition of Battlesytems. The followup skirmish book wasn't as good.

Although I have to admit I wince when looking at the painted minis in the photos throughout the book.

They weren't particularly well painted, even for that time.

 

I love the painting instructions. Hoo boy. Reaper's LTPK - even the very first one - was a huge leap forward. Even the citadel paint books, even the later outrageously pricey ones, aren't so great. I think the later ones might even be worse than the originals. Awful glad I thumbed through the later one (it had LotR figures in it, so was newish) and saved myself the wasted cash.

I'm surprised; my FLGS had them in shrink wrap specifically to prevent people from doing just that. :devil: My understanding is they came from the distributor that way...
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I tried to play Twilight:2000 but between the 1st and 2nd Editions there was a massive rules change that made the editions incompatible.  I wasn't able to either get enough 1st ed or enough 2nd ed materials to cobble a full game from, so I was left with a very interesting but entirely incomprehensible game. 

 

Shame, too, because it looked like fun. 

 

I played in a brief (~6 month) campaign of that in high school.  I wasn't running it so I have no idea if we were using the rules as written but it was a blast.  My character ended up going out in a literal blaze of glory...he was incinerated when his flamethrower tank got punctured and exploded.  On the plus side he took out about half the enemy force because he was standing next to a stack of tank ammo.  On the down side he also took out about half our guys as well. 

 

 

Inquisitor from an imaginary GW that doesn't shoot itself in the foot.  I love the art, fluff, and concept of Inquisitor.  The actual rule-set and decision to go with a totally different scale than their other games made me grind my teeth.  This could have been a great game if they had used the exact same fluff and concept and applied something like the Necromunda rules to it.  Or just paid the guys that do In the Emperor's Name to write their rules for them. 

 

Anyway, what's yours?

 

 

I spotted some guys on the internet that used GW 40K plastics conversions to play Inquisitor. They made up special characters and could use bigger maps/tables.

 

If that isn't the In the Name of the Emperor guys I'ld be interested in a link.   I'm interested in ITEN as well, but I already know where they are. ^_^

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Pinnacle's Deadlands classic so much awesome that Savage World Reloaded can't even come close to.

Hear, hear!

 

Although, to be fair, I had to play it at a convention to figure out the rules at all...

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