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Sculpting Putty Differences

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I actually cheap out and generally use Testors Contour Putty for gap filling. It smooths nicely with a wet fingertip. I use liquid greenstuff for small gaps, though.

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I wrote this up for another post, but figured it should be here too.  I hope it helps.

 

 

Green Stuff (Kneadatite Blue/Yellow):

 

- 2 part epoxy putty

- High memory

- Working time 1 to 2 hours

- Not tool-able

- Very fine grained

- Water proof

- Slightly flexable when cured

- $$$

 

Andy's Notes: My go to putty of choice for most fine detail work.  It's high memory does cause it to be difficult to use in hard edged applications.  This can be alleviated by adding a bit of Apoxie Sculpt or FIMO into the mix.

 

 

Brown Stuff (Keadatite Brown/White):

 

- 2 part epoxy putty

- Working time 1 to 2 hours

- Tool-able

- Very fine grained

- Water proof

- Hard when cured

- $$$$

 

Andy's Notes: I used to use this for hard edged applications where I wanted to sand or file the sculpt, like for weapon blades.  It is very expensive though.   I have switched to a mix of Apoxie Sculpt/Green Stuff for tool-able applications now.

 

 

Procreate:

 

- 2 part epoxy putty

- Medium memory

- Working time 1 to 2 hours

- Not tool-able

- Very fine grained

- Water proof

- Slightly flexable when cured

- $$$

 

Andy's Notes: I haven't used this one yet.  The stats above are what I have gleaned from those who have, like Patrick Keith.  Getting some of this is on my to do list once my current stock of GS runs low.

 

 

Apoxie Sculpt:

 

- 2 part epoxy putty

- Working time 2 to 4 hours

- Very soft when uncured; low memory

- Tool-able

- Fine grained

- Semi-water soluble when uncured (i.e., can be smoothed with water)

- Very hard/brittle when cured

- $$

 

Andy's Notes: I do not like using Apoxie Sculpt alone; it has very low memory and so takes detail well, but it also has almost no tool resistance.  Mixed with GS it cuts the memory of the GS and makes it tool-able; while the GS adds a bit of flexibility and some tool resistance.  That said, for my fine detail work, I still prefer GS because of the way the tools slide in the GS but pull in the Apoxie Sculpt.

 

 

Milliput:

 

- 2 part epoxy putty

- Working time 2 to 4 hours

- Tool-able

- Medium grained

- Semi-water soluble when uncured (i.e., can be smoothed with water)

- Very hard when cured

- $

 

Andy's Notes: I do not like Milliput; it is too grainy, and Apoxie Scult does all the same things, but better.

 

 

FIMO Classic:

 

- Polymer Clay

- Does not cure, needs to be heat hardened

- Does not easily stick to an armature (add a thin layer of GS to the armature first then stick the FIMO to the uncured GS; when the GS cures, the Fimo will be stuck to the armature and you can add more)

- Tool-able after baking

- Very fine grained

- Needs to be conditioned/worked to make it soft enough to manipulate

- Tool action and lubrication needs are different than the Epoxy putties

- $$

 

Andy's Notes: I don't have a lot of experience using polymer clays yet; just what I learned in a class I took from Gene. Fimo does relax GS and doubles the cure time when added to the GS in a 4:1 GS:FIMO ratio.

 

 

Super Sculpy:

 

- Polymer Clay

- Does not cure, needs to be heat hardened

- Does not easily stick to an armature (add a thin layer of GS to the armature first then stick the clay to the uncured GS; when the GS cures, the clay will be stuck to the armature and you can add more)

- Tool-able after baking

- Fine grained

- Needs to be conditioned/worked to make it soft enough to manipulate

- Tool action and lubrication needs are different than the Epoxy putties

- $$

 

Andy's Notes: I don't have a lot of experience using polymer clays yet; just what I learned in a class I took from Gene. Sculpy is not as liked by the pros as FIMO Classic is.

 

 

Bee's Putty:

 

- Polymer Clay

- Does not cure, needs to be heat hardened

- Sticks to an armature 

- Tool-able after baking

- Very fine grained

- Needs to be conditioned/worked to make it soft enough to manipulate

- Tool action and lubrication needs are different than the Epoxy putties

- $$$

 

Andy's Notes: I just bought some of this and will be experimenting soon.  This is a new product; word on the net though is that it sticks to vulcanized molds and will need additional handling to ensure proper casting.  Resin casting should be fine though.

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Excellent list, some very useful info in there!

 

 

Brown Stuff (Keadatite Brown/White):

 

- Discontinued by the manufacturer

 

Quick question on this if you (or anyone else!) knows the answer. Privateer Press still sells the Brown/Aluminium version of this putty - apparently they got a deal to keep it being made. I assume it's vulcanisable like the usual Brown/White, but don't know... any ideas?

 

 

 

 

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Excellent list, some very useful info in there!

 

 

Brown Stuff (Keadatite Brown/White):

 

- Discontinued by the manufacturer

 

Quick question on this if you (or anyone else!) knows the answer. Privateer Press still sells the Brown/Aluminium version of this putty - apparently they got a deal to keep it being made. I assume it's vulcanisable like the usual Brown/White, but don't know... any ideas?

 

I just did a check with the manufacturer (PSI) and they once more have it on their website.  They must have gotten enough demand to keep making it. I'll edit my list.

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Glad to hear brown stuff is still being made. Very useful for minis, and I had some uses for it outside of the hobby.

 

And thanks for the review Andy. I will probably try some on the list that I didn't have a desire to previously.

Edited by Humansquish
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Got myself some Super Sculpey Firm. It's not bad as a sculpting medium, the firmness and neutral gray color make it easy to sculpt fine details. Nice and cheap compared to epoxy putties (I can buy this by the POUND?!) But it's a polymer clay, not a epoxy putty, so it's not particularly elastic and I can't really recommend it for sculpting anything near miniature sizes, at least not straight by itself.

 

Consider it for busts, large, resin kit-sized miniatures, and anything roughly 1/12 scale or bigger, where the 2 hour working times of epoxy putties become problematic.

 

Update 8/22: Well... maybe it isn't so bad. The secret is it needs some sort of lubricant or oil. They sell a sculpey softener, I just use vaseline. Interesting that lubricating it actually makes it stick better to itself.

Edited by djizomdjinn

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With regard to some epoxy putties hardening/spoiling with age, I bought a 5 lb. kit of Magic Sculpt 10 years ago. The components come in two separate plastic tubs.

I used some just today and it works as easily as the day I bought it.

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Bee's Putty:

- Polymer Clay

- Does not cure, needs to be heat hardened

- Sticks to an armature 

- Tool-able after baking

- Very fine grained

- Needs to be conditioned/worked to make it soft enough to manipulate

- Tool action and lubrication needs are different than the Epoxy putties

- $$$

Andy's Notes: I just bought some of this and will be experimenting soon.  This is a new product; word on the net though is that it sticks to vulcanized molds and will need additional handling to ensure proper casting.  Resin casting should be fine though.

Sorry for bringing this one back from the dead but I am trying to get a simple question answered about this product and unfortunately my google-foo is weak.  When you say "it sticks to vulcanized molds and needs additional handling" what do you mean?  Does it stick to the mold after the vulcanization process?  What additional handling does it need in this case?  I have been at the internets for well over an hour trying to find out if it can be vulcanized.  Any help is appreciated. 

Snitchy sends.

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Bee's Putty:

- Polymer Clay

- Does not cure, needs to be heat hardened

- Sticks to an armature 

- Tool-able after baking

- Very fine grained

- Needs to be conditioned/worked to make it soft enough to manipulate

- Tool action and lubrication needs are different than the Epoxy putties

- $$$

Andy's Notes: I just bought some of this and will be experimenting soon.  This is a new product; word on the net though is that it sticks to vulcanized molds and will need additional handling to ensure proper casting.  Resin casting should be fine though.

Sorry for bringing this one back from the dead but I am trying to get a simple question answered about this product and unfortunately my google-foo is weak.  When you say "it sticks to vulcanized molds and needs additional handling" what do you mean?  Does it stick to the mold after the vulcanization process?  What additional handling does it need in this case?  I have been at the internets for well over an hour trying to find out if it can be vulcanized.  Any help is appreciated. 

Snitchy sends.

 

 

I don't know, but will ask a couple pros I know who do and get back to you.

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I talked to Patrick K. who uses it.  He says that it doesn't need anything different than any other polymer clays (like FIMO or Sculpy),  The sculpt should be sprayed with a few coats of Dulcote. They would likely break in the molding process, but that is true of any polymer clay.

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I talked to Patrick K. who uses it.  He says that it doesn't need anything different than any other polymer clays (like FIMO or Sculpy),  The sculpt should be sprayed with a few coats of Dulcote. They would likely break in the molding process, but that is true of any polymer clay.

Thank you so much.  I had already placed an order so I could test this stuff out but had an oh ____ moment when I realized that I had not checked on whether it could be vulcanized or not.  Thanks again. 

Snitchy sends.

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I've been having a great time sculpting with ProCreate and Fimo and GS and Fimo. I'm of the impression that if you want a very smooth look that pure GS might be the way to go though.

 

I popped in though to ask if anyone was familiar with a sculpting medium that cures with an almost enamel look. I've seen it used on a few blogs or WiP pictures but I'm not sure what exactly it is or what it's uses are. The two places I most recently saw it were using it for two seemingly different things.. one for large teeth and the other for a very large demon (one of the WiPs from the Fractured Dimensions newsletter/WiP blog).

 

EDIT: To clarify, when I say it looks like enamel.. it has a vaguely translucent property to it. I have a 3d background and we call that look subsurface scattering.. but it's the look teeth get at the edges where light barely passes through.

Edited by 4tonmantis
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I popped in though to ask if anyone was familiar with a sculpting medium that cures with an almost enamel look. I've seen it used on a few blogs or WiP pictures but I'm not sure what exactly it is or what it's uses are. The two places I most recently saw it were using it for two seemingly different things.. one for large teeth and the other for a very large demon (one of the WiPs from the Fractured Dimensions newsletter/WiP blog).

 

EDIT: To clarify, when I say it looks like enamel.. it has a vaguely translucent property to it. I have a 3d background and we call that look subsurface scattering.. but it's the look teeth get at the edges where light barely passes through.

If it was large pieces, and a tan / flesh color, I'd say it was probably Super Sculpey, which doesn't cure at all. It instead needs baking in order to reach a cured state.

 

Super Sculpey Firm, which is an opaque gray, I very occasionally see used in miniature work, like in this archer tutorial by Brother Vinni.

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