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HELP! I accidentally treated anti-shine additive like an over-coat!


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Now my dragon's wings and a couple other spots are basically whitewashed! Is there ANYTHING I can do that isn't repainting it to get rid of the coating? Otherwise, I just completely ruined hours of work!

 

Thanks much guys, and thanks even MORE if someone actually has a fix!!

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This is commonly referred to as "frosting" (might help if you're doing a forum search).  I've heard that if you put a gloss coat over the top, that often fixes it.  I'd recommend checking out other threads on the topic before taking my advice though.

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1. Don't panic.

 

2. Any gloss medium painted over should take the whiteness out of it, but if it's really white it may need a little scraping off first.

 

Details to follow.

Edited by Pingo
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Details: I just happen to be in the middle of an experiment about gloss and matte mediums and additives.

 

I have numerous paint strips tested first with assorted gloss coats, then matte coats, to try to determine what works well with what I have.

 

In the course of this I discovered that whatever Reaper's anti-shine additive is, it most certainly is not matte medium as I understand it. It dries to a chalky, white, almost crystalline fuzz, as I gather you have discovered to your sorrow.

 

So I just sacrificed a bit of a test strip, brushing some gloss medium over the Reaper anti-shine additive to see what would happen.

 

...

 

Oh, blast, it still has some whiteness. Where the additive was thin the gloss medium has invisibled it but where it was thick still has some whiteness.

 

You may have to scrape gently at the chalkiest bits before adding some gloss medium.

Edited by Pingo
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It dries to a chalky, white, almost crystalline fuzz, as I gather you have discovered to your sorrow.

 

Yup! I have, indeed! It's frosted like a Pop Tart! If it were Nyan Dragon, that might be ok, but I have specific, non frosted plans for this one. (CRAP! No! I am not, under any circumstances, going to make a Nyan Dragon! Dammit! Noooooooooo! Shut up brain, or I'll stab you with a Q-Tip!)

 

Details: I just happen to be in the middle of an experiment about gloss and matte mediums and additives.

...

 

Oh, blast, it still has some whiteness. Where the additive was thin the gloss medium has invisibled it but where it was thick still has some whiteness.

 

You may have to scrape gently at the chalkiest bits before adding some gloss medium.

Ohhh bless you!!!

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Might a soft brush, like a toothbrush or a stiff plastic small-parts-cleaning brush erode the fuzz sufficiently?

 

Also, Reaper's matte additive is NOT matte medium. It's just enough liquid to keep the matting fines suspended, and almost nothing else. It's purely and only an additive. Whereas I think Matte medium is an acrylic medium that dries matte?

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I put the gloss medium on without thinning it much. It is possible that a thinned-down coat would do a better job of penetrating the whiteness, since this is clearly a matter of changing the refractive index of the matting agents.

 

I'm away from the studio now, so can't check this immediately.

 

The behavior of the anti-shine additive was surprising when I painted the test strips, and I can only imagine what it felt like to see it on your own mini. I'm sorry.

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Eureka!

 

Since I had the test strips already, and since the anti-shine additive was clearly a no-go, I figured I'd try to see if I could remove the additive without marring the paint.

 

It is, in fact, quite fragile and powdery on the surface.

 

A gentle circular motion with a dry, soft toothbrush takes it off pretty fast. A clean dry fingernail can do it too but is more tedious.

 

Be advised this was over a gloss isolation coat. It is possible that the brush may slightly mar the surface underneath if the paint has no other protective layer. That's why I recommend a dry, soft toothbrush and a light hand.

 

Don't breathe the dust.

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Addendum: A dry paper towel worked very well, too, and probably would be even gentler to the surface than a soft toothbrush.

 

Keeping things dry seems to be a key. Wet seems to make the white stuff temporarily invisible and push it around.

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